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Manuscripts, correspondence, photographs, printed material, graphics, and bound manuscripts by, to, or about Wyndham Lewis, covering all aspects of his career and life. Includes one of two known proof copies of his novel The Roaring Queen, which was withdrawn before publication; unpublished novels, short stories, essays, and notebooks; and manuscripts and notes for Lewis's published books The Apes of God, Self Condemned, The Human Age (including Childermass, Malign Fiesta, Monstre Gai, and a synopsis of the projected fourth volume which Lewis never wrote), Mrs. Duke's Millions, The Red Priest, Rotting Hill, Rude Assignment, and The Writer and the Absolute. Also included are diaries of Lewis's wife, G. Anne Hoskyns Lewis, from 1953-1967, and Civil War reminiscences of his father, Charles Edward Lewis.

Letters include correspondence with Ezra Pound, and transcriptions of letters between Lewis and his mother while he was at the front during World War I; letters from members of his father Charles Edward Lewis's family, dating back to the 1870's, which describe life in upstate New York and Ontario; and many letters between Wyndham Lewis and other writers and publishers. Correspondents include Richard Aldington, Michael Ayrton, Lewis's lover Iris Barry, Clive Bell, Roy Campbell, Lord Kenneth Clark, T.S. Eliot, Roger Fry, Stuart Gilbert, Geoffrey Grigson, Ernest Hemingway, R.D. Jameson, Augustus John, Hugh Kenner, Charles Edward Lewis, Wyndham Lewis's mother Anne Stuart Lewis, his wife G. Anne Hoskyns Lewis, Archibald MacLeish, Marshall McLuhan, Naomi Mitchison, T. Sturge Moore (photocopies), Frederick Morgan, Dorothy Pound, Ezra Pound, C.H. Prentice, I.A. Richards, Sir John Rothenstein; Edith, Osbert, and Sacheverell Sitwell; Stephen Spender, Julian Symons, Tambimuttu, Allen Tate, H.G. Wells, and W.B. Yeats. The collection also includes two letters from Lewis to James Joyce.


[St. Louis] [Appears to be prepared for a talk at the "Wednesday Club" on February 18, 1944]


[Windsor] Written for a lecture delivered at the summer school of Assumption College. Annotated heavily in written draft; only slightly in typed draft.


[Toronto?] Written in French, this radio address emphasizes the unity of western culture as an encouragement to French Canadians to join in the war effort.


[n.p.] A slightly revised version of this article was publiched in "The New Republic," July 8, 1940. One TM[copy] has corrections by Lewis.


[London] Heavily corrected and amended.


[n.p.] [With annotations and corrections]


[n.p.] [With dustjacket proof sheet]


[Ottawa] [First notes for his "political book".]


[London] [4 leaves listings of correction to manuscript; and 1 leaf regarding publisher disagreement]


[n.p.] [With additions and corrections in hand]


[n.p.] [A parody of Lewis' visit to Geoffrey Stone's Connecticut farm at this period. Two chapters both marked "Extra chapter, not used"]


[n.p.] [Concerning expansion and re-issue of book]


[n.p.] [Handwritten notes on both sides of an envelope]


[Toronto?] Synopsis of "Self-Condemned".


[Toronto] Follow-up material and a prospectus for a pamphlet tentatively titled "How Will Democracy Evolve? With corrections.


[n.p.] [From J. Carter's books. Copied into a notebook by Anne Lewis.]


[n.p.] [Could be from "America, I Presume"]


[London] [Small note pad with 5 leaves used; remainder of pad is blank. Many miscellaneous leaves of various sized with both notes and sketches. Printed 4 page article by Lieut.-Col. E. F. Strange, "The Design of English Chairs"; and two clippings, one a review of Godfrey Winn's, "Squirrels' Cage" (The Star, June 10, 1923) and the other on climbing Mount Kanchenjunga.


London; Drafts and clean typescript of introductory material apparently written to preface the reprint edition. Varying texts in Lewis' and Anne Lewis.


[London]


[London] "Extract from Encyclical Addressed to Daniel Boleyn by Mr. Zagreus". With minor corrections in Lewis' hand. Published in "Criterion", II, No. 7, April, 1924.


[London?.] Notes, synopsis, philosophical thesis, and partial draft of a proposed novel. Has some relation to "Revenge for Love" and "Snooty Baronet."


[n.p.] Discussion of Van Gogh's painting "L'Arlesienne". Published in "Wyndham Lewis on Art," p. 459.


[n.p.] Quotations from various sources concerning "The Art of Being Ruled".


[n.p.] American press notices for "Art of Being Ruled"


[London] Holograph version heavily emended. Published in "The Listener", October 10, 1946, p. 484.


[n.p.]


[Toronto?] Notation by Lewis indicates this article was written for possible submission to "Time & Tide." Published in "Wyndham Lewis in Canada", 1971.


[n.p.] Lecture probably delivered at Bryanston Music School, Blandford, Dorset on August 1, 1948. Deals with the social background of art, the question of a "collective" art, and the decline of oil "easel-painting.".


[n.p.]


Quimperle; A description of a stay in Brittany with commentary of local customs and residents. Heavily corrected; with a map sketched on first leaf.


[n.p.] Mentions the Bolshevik revolution and the Spanish Civil War.


[n.p.] Includes draft bersion and holograph portion of completed and published text. Published in "The English Review, 2 (June, 1909), p. 471-484. Reprinted in "The Wild Body."


[New York] Chronological account of activities and publications, apparently written as press release material for a proposed lecture tour.


[London] For publicity purposes


[New York?, Toronto?] 3 draft versionss containing basic biographical information, possibly for a press release.


[n.p.] Regarding his father, Carles Edward Lewis.


[n.p.]


[London] [Notes and heavily corrected manuscript fragments.]


[n.p.] [Draft of pages 286-287. Concerns T. S. Eliot and his relation to Ezra Pound.]


[n.p.] [See pp. 274-281 of 1967a "Blasting and Bombardiering. See Part V, ch. 5 of "Blasting and Bombardiering".]


[n.p.] [Alternate title: "Say It With Leaves". Corrected typescript of essay; holograph material essentially notations on Lytton Strachey.]


[n.p.] [Photocopy done for patron which was returned.]


[n.p.] [Poem.]


[New York?] [Chronological listing with publication dates and precis of contents of books Lewis wrote.]


[London] Holograph drafts of this article appeared in "The Listener", September 8, 1949, p. 407. Lewis wrote to T.S. Eliot a year later about expanding it to book form.


[London] Holograph drafts of this article appeared in "The Listener", September 8, 1949, p. 407. Lewis wrote to T.S. Eliot a year later about expanding it to book form.


[n.p.] Printed in "The Calendar of Modern Letters", January, 1926, p. 360-362. Xerox copy.


[Lydd?] Reference to this is made in the chapter of "Blasting and Bombardiering" of the same name. Two copies of the typed manuscript, one containing corrections made by G. Anne (Hoskyns) Lewis' hand.


[Toronto] Typescript copy of introductory and closing commentary referring to accompanying broadcast Lewis made on CBC on December 12, 1940. On CBC Continuity letterhead.


[n.p.] First published in "The Listener", Aug.29, 1946, later in "Wyndam Lewis on Art", p. 425-429.


[n.p.] Narrative concerns Cantelman during World War I; public and private attitudes toward the war. The final leaves of the draft involve Cantelman's reading of the "Code." Portions of the manuscript are published as Chapter IV, "The War-Crowds, 1914", of Part II of "Blasting and Bombardiering".


[n.p.] Variant text of Cantelman. Typescript with changes and revisions in the hand of G. Anne Lewis.


[n.p.] Heavily amended draft, dated and signed by Lewis. This story first published in "The Little Review", vol. IV, no. 6 (October, 1917), p. 8-14. Issued in a privately printed edition with "The Ideal Giant" and "The Code of a Herdsnab" in 1917.


[n.p.] Last paragraph states: "Cantleman's Spring-Mate and "War Baby" which fillows it were in included in the original edition of "Blasting and Bombadiering".


[London] Two draft versions and a copy of the final text, as printed in "The Listener", January 13, 1949, p. 65.


[London] Folder of notes, clippings and printed material related to the Chantrey bequest and envelope material came in, marked as such.


[London] Notes and portions of manuscript, heavily corrected and annotated. Material dates from the period of the first issue of the book in 1928 and from ca. 1955 when a reprint edition was prepared.


[London] Notes and portions of manuscript, heavily corrected and annotated. Material dates from the period of the first issue of the book in 1928 and from ca. 1955 when a reprint edition was prepared.


[London] The text of this appears on the dust jacket of the 1955 reprint. In the hand of Anne Lewis


[London] The text of this appears on the dust jacket of the 1955 reprint.


[London] Minor corrections in the hand of Anne Wyndham Lewis. Short story.


[London] Published in "The Listener", April 6, 1950.


[n.p.] Satire of Ford Madox Ford. First published in "Unlucky for Pringle"/


[Windsor] Group I notes for a series of lectures delivered in Lewis' Philosophy of Literature course, taught in 1943-1944 at Assumption College, Worcester, Mass.


[Windsor] Group II notes for a series of lectures delivered in Lewis' Philosophy of Literature course, taught in 1943-1944 at Assumption College, Worcester, Mass.


[Windsor] Group II notes for a series of lectures delivered in Lewis' Philosophy of Literature course, taught in 1943-1944 at Assumption College, Worcester, Mass.


[London] Typescript short story version. Has some thematic relation to "Self Condemned" and "The Red Priest".


[London] Play format. Holograph and final typescript version of a dramatized version of the same entitled "The Right Way".


[London] Play format. Holograph and final typescript version of a dramatized version of the same entitled "The Right Way"


[London] Text of radio address, delivered on the BBC "Third Programme", March 16, 1947. A variant of this text forms a portion of the Foreword to "The Books -- A Pattern of Thinking", in "Rude Assignment". With annotations in Lewis's hand.


[London] Lewis wrote this dedication in a book sent to Symons on Oct.28, 1932. [Written on the back of a "gummed luggage labels" envelope.]


[London] Includes notes: portions of the manuscript are in the hand of Anne Lewis.


[London] Few hand written leaves.


[n.p.] First leaf under heading "Specimen MARGINALIA"' secpmd jeaded "ROOM 59".


[n.p.] With holograph not by Lewis. Notes on "Arghol" and "The Cubist Museum."


[London] The complet text published in "The Sewanee Review", 54, no.4, Autumn, 1956, p. 555-575. Includes 5 leaves of article as printed.


[London] Written on the back of an envelope addressed to Lewis at Adam & Eve Mews.


[London] Small booklet used mainly for engagements; only May 17 through July 28 used.


[New York] Only pages January 1 through April 9 in booklet; the rest have been torn out.


[London] In article form, the substance of this appeared as Chapter 6 "Intuition versus Intellect ..." in "Rude Assignment". Typescript with holograph corrections in Lewis' hand.


[New York? Toronto?] Memoir dealing with Lewis' father, Charles Edward Lewis. Published in "Agenda", VII-VIII, nos.3-1, Autumn/Winter, p. 216-221.


[London] Notes and instructions for lawyers; textual citations. Concerns the lawsuits intituted by Godfrey Winn and Alec Waugh and Lewis, as well as a summary by Lewis of it manuscript preparation.


[London] Two draft versions; one in Lewis' hand, with insertions in the hands of Anne Lewis and Agnes Bedford; the second in Anne Wyndham Lewis' hand. Published in "Encounter", 2, no.1, January, 1954, p. 23-33, and in "Unlucky for Pringle", 1973.


[London] Short story, with insertions and corrections in the hand of Anne Lewis.


[n.p.] Fragment from "The Do-Nothing Mode"


London; Biography and memories of Wadsworth, a fellow "vorticist".


[London] Two hand written manuscripts, one by Lewis, the second in the hand of Anne Lewis. Written for "Educational Review".


[London] First published in "Blast", 1, 1914.


[n.p.] Appears to be a later rewriting of a piece first published in "Blast 1". There is a part ofr the blind Lewis.


[Loondon?] Holograph text of "Envoi" first published in 1933 in volume of verse entitled "Engine Fight-Talk ..."; reissued in 1960 with title-page of "One-Way Song".


[Toronto?] Unpublished?


[n.p.]


[n.p.] Foreward to an art exhibition catalogue, annotations in Lewis' hand. Found with Arthur Press announcement for "Satire & Fiction," 1930.


London; Foreword to his exhibition catalogue.


[n.p.] Appears to be a draft for Lewis' article in "An Examinationn of Ezra Pound, edited by Peter Russell.


[London] With corrections in Lewis' hand. Published in "Ezra Pound: A Collection of Essays" edited by Peter Russell, London, Peter Nevill, 1950, p. 257-266.


[London] Varying texts 9apparently uncompleted) in two formats; dramatic and narrative. Title supplied in the hand of Anne Lewis


[London] Lewis' first book on Morocco, which is continued with the unpublished "Kasbhs and Souks". Published in serial form in "Everyman". The notes inluded are in the hand of Cyril J. Fox, wirtten October, 1981.


[n.p.] This appeared as Part V, Chapter VI (p. 282-289) of the 1967 revised version of "Blasting and Bombardiering".


[London?] Cutting and pasting of 3 leaves in the hand of Anne Lewis.


[Windsor?] Possibly part of "The Frontiers of Art ...", a lecture Lewis delivered at the Detroit Institute of Arts on November 30, 1943.


[Windsor] Lecture Lewis delivered at the Detroit Institute of Arts on November 30, 1943. With an introductory biographical sketch written by Lewis.


[London] Foreward to Michael Ayrton's "Golden Section" published in 1957. Holograph manuscript in the hand of Anne Lewis.


[Bedford?] Small notebook of this juvenile novel written and illustrated by Lewis.


[London] Preface written for the Grafton Group second exhibition, January, 1914. It is an attack on Rober Fry who Lewis had broken from. Included is the 4 page catalogue which has some of Lewis' notes.


[n.p.] This poem was first published in "The Tramp: An Open Air Magazine", December 1910, p. 246. One holograph, signed by Lewis, may have been the printer's copy.


[London] A review by Lewis' (unpublished?) of four works: E. S. Harland's "Primitive Society" and "Primitive Law", L. H. Dudley Buxton's "Primitve Labour", and E. O. James' "Primitve Ritual and Belief".


[London]


[Various places] Manuscripts and letters which could not be identified. Many are accompanied by notes of Lewis scholar "guesses" as to the identity.


[n.p.] List of paintings Lewis let Duncan have on July 4, 1942.


London; "Guns" was Lewis' first one-man show; held at the Goupil Gallery, January 1919. Includes copy of the catalogue.


[n.p.] This is the title of a drawing or painting dated 1938.


[Windsor] Lecture notes


[Toronto] Synopsis and notes are for a proposed novel deling with Canadian history and the larger theme of "civilization" and its effects/definition. Published in the "Wyndham Lewis in Canada" number of "Canadian Literature".


[London?] A heavily corrected draft of an account of Lewis' visit to Berlin. Varies greatly from the opening descriptive section "Berlin" of "Hitler".


[London] Notes and drafts of proposed novel. Portions of the text have been published in the Wyndham Lewis Special number of "Agenda", v.7, nos.3-4, Autumn, 1969.


[London]


[London] Sections I-III. One holograph by Lewis; second in the hand of Anne Lewis.


[London] Sections IV-V. One holograph by Lewis; second in the hand of Anne Lewis.


[London] Sections VI-XI. One holograph by Lewis; second in the hand of Anne Lewis.


[London] Sections XII-XIII. One holograph by Lewis; second in the hand of Anne Lewis.


[London] SectionsXIV-XIX. One holograph by Lewis; second in the hand of Anne Lewis.


[London] Part I. One holograph by Lewis; second in the hand of Anne Lewis.


[London] Part II. One holograph by Lewis; second in the hand of Anne Lewis.


[London] Part III. One holograph by Lewis; second in the hand of Anne Lewis.


[London] Part IV. One holograph by Lewis; second in the hand of Anne Lewis.


[London] Opening chapter copied for a patron and returned.


[London] Chapter 9..


[London] Sections I-III. One holograph by Lewis; second in the hand of Anne Lewis.


[London] Section I


[London] Section II


[London] Section III


[London] Section IV


[London] Sections IV-VI


[London] Sections VII-IX


[London] Sections X-XIV


[London] Sections XV-XXII


[London] Partial galley proofs.


[London] Xerox copy of opening chapter for researcher which was returned.


[London] Dialogue


[London] Dialogue, as requested by Mr. Bridson.


[London] Miscellaneous sheets


[London] Miscellaneous text, notes and unidentified sheets. Some AM in the hand of AnneLewis.


[London] Miscellaneous text, notes and unidentified sheets.Some AM in the hand of Anne Lewis.


[London] Miscellaneous text, notes and unidentified sheets. Some AM in the hand of Anne Lewis.


[London] Miscellaneous text, notes and unidentified sheets. Some AM in the hand of AnneLewis.


[London] Miscellaneous text, notes and unidentified sheets. Some AM in the hand of Anne Lewis.


[London] Miscellaneous materials labelled as notes and rejected materials.


[London] Miscellaneous materials about "The Human Age"


[Toronto?] Observations for a lecture on America and England; from a transplanted Englishman's viewpoint.


[n.p.] Heavily amended holograph drafts and typescript versions of the first of the "Imaginary Letters" as published in "The Little Review", vol. IV, no.1, May 1917, p. 19-23.


[n.p.] Drafts with portions of printed text, of the second "Imaginary Letter" as published in vol. IV, no.2, June, 1917 issue of "The Little Review", p. 22-26.


[London] Heavily amended draft as published as letter no. IV in "The Little Review, vol. IV, no.11, March 1918, p. 23-30. "The Code of a Herdsman", published in July 1917 as part of the "Imaginary Letters", is considered to form part of the "Cantleman Saga".


[London?] Heavily amended draft of the fourth "Imaginary Letter", published in "The Little Review, Vol. IV, no. 11, March 1918, p. 23-30, as letter no V.


[London?] Published in "The Little Review", vol. 4, no. 12, April 1918, p. 50-54 as letters VI 7 VII. The typescript of Letter V has Manuscript revisions and additions in the hand of Anne Lewis.


[Windsor] May be part of Assumption College lecture on art.


[London] The "Exhibition of Paintings, Drawings, and Watercolours by Wyndham Lewis" was held at the Redfern Gallery, London, 1949.


London; Lewis served as chairman for the meeting of the Poetry Society at which Peter Russell read. Includes commentary on Pound's imprisonment and his early advocacy of both Joyce and Lewis.


[Toronto] Lettered: "After-the-war Series".


[London] Contains notes and outlines of chapters for a future book, probably the unfinished "Joint".


[n.p.] From the unfinished novel "Joint".


[London] Notes and drafts of a proposed novel; selections from the manuscript were published in the Wyndham Lewis Special Number of "Agenda", vol. 7, nos. 3-4, Autumn 1969.


[London] Notes and drafts of a proposed novel; selections from the manuscript were published in the Wyndham Lewis Special Number of "Agenda", vol. 7, nos. 3-4, Autumn 1969.


[London] Notes and drafts of a proposed novel; selections from the manuscript were published in the Wyndham Lewis Special Number of "Agenda", vol. 7, nos. 3-4, Autumn 1969.


[London] Notes and drafts of a proposed novel; selections from the manuscript were published in the Wyndham Lewis Special Number of "Agenda", vol. 7, nos. 3-4, Autumn 1969.


[London] Parts of "Joint" used as a teaching tool.


[n.p.] Lewis writes on this piece that it is a vignette "of an event, truthfully recounted."


[London] Manuscript and typescript versions of a novella, with corrections in the hand of Anne Lewis.


[London?] Was to be Lewis' second book on Morocco, "Filibusters in Barbary" being the first. This was never published although part may have appeared as "What Are the Berbers?" in "The Bookman", LXXXV, p. 183-186.Some notes were added by Cyril J. Fox, October, 1981.


[Toronto] This adddress was originally delivered at a bond rally in Toronto. From a notation on the first holograph leaf, Lewis had plans to issue the talk in pamphlet form.


[n.p.] Drafts of a story, re-worked several times. Published in 1967 as a chapter in "Blasting and Bombardiering". Typescript drafts bear corrections in Lewis' hand.


[Various places] Unidentified notes and fragments for lectures given at various places


[Windsor] Text of a lecture delivered at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.


[London] Apparently written for broadcast.


[n.p.] Given in 1940 or 1941.


[Windsor?] Notes for a lecture most probably delivered at Assumption College.


[Windsor?] Delivered as a lecture at Assumption College?


[Windsor?] Part of the Assumption College lectures on art Lewis delivered in 1944?


[Windsor] Notes for two lectures delivered at Assumption College in January and February 1944.


[London] Notes concerning the sale.


[Toronto] A list of four names and addresses of those Lewis sent letters.


[London?Toronto?] A lecture or radio address.


[n.p.] Published in "Wyndham Lewis the Artist" and "Wyndham Lewis on Art", p. 32-34.


[London] Material identified in Lewis' hand on face of envelope.


[Windsor] Listing of when to do things and people with addresses and phone numbers.


[n.p.] Three columns of women's names.


[London] List is for the information of Lewis' mother with value in pounds. This was drawn up by Lewis "before going to the front". Lists owners of his works including John Quinn, Capt. Guy Baker, as well as those being held by Ezra Pound.


[London?] May have been prepared for Charles Handley-Read for "The Art of Wyndham Lewis".


[Toronto?] The list includes a book on aesthetics, a novel titled "The Refugee", a reprint of Charles Edward Lewis' "With the First Dragoons in Virginia" and part of Lewis' "American Autobiography", and a book on politics to contain a re-assessment of Hitler.


[n.p.] Three leaves with just names listed in three columns.


[n.p.] Appears to be a transcript of Lewis' literary criticism written down by others when he was blind.On verso is an AL[draft] of Anne Lewis to Marshal McLuhan, n.d., asking McLuhan to take responsibility of Lewis' copyright in the event of her death.


[Various Places] Transcripts typed around 1960 for the book, "Letters of Wyndham Lewis", edited by W. K. Rose (London, 1963). Among transcripts are some for which Cornell has no originals. 4 letters by T.S. Eliot, 1 letter by Charles Edward Lewis, 2 letters by G. Anne (Hoskyns) Lewis.


[Various Places] Transcripts typed around 1960 for the book, "Letters of Wyndham Lewis", edited by W. K. Rose (London, 1963). Among transcripts are some for which Cornell has no originals.Fragments of letters by Wyndham Lewis.


[Various Places] Transcripts typed around 1960 for the book, "Letters of Wyndham Lewis", edited by W. K. Rose (London, 1963). Among transcripts are some for which Cornell has no originals. Undated of letters by Wyndham Lewis.


[Various Places] Transcripts typed around 1960 for the book, "Letters of Wyndham Lewis", edited by W. K. Rose (London, 1963). Among transcripts are some for which Cornell has no originals. Dated letters by Wyndham Lewis.


[London] Typescript copy, with occasional handwritten revisions, for the book edited by W. K. Rose. A few of the pages are missing.


[London] 2 draft versions, one in Lewis' hand, the second in G. Anne Lewis' hand; along with a typed version of this short story.


[St. Louis] Includes a listing of prominent English sitters and a commentary on the portrait of Dr. Joseph Erlanger.


[London] Notebook, title page indicating above title with "An educational pamphlet" of mathematical problems and sets involving "9, the pivot of the rcurring decimal." Crossed out is the title "Casting Out the Nines".


[London] Fragment entitled "Addition and Subtraction".


[London]Draft in the hand of G. Anne Lewis and typescript carbon of article published in the Special Autumn Number, August 6, 1954, of "The Times Literary Supplement."


[Windsor?] Text of an address delivered before the Arts Club of Chicago, February 29, 1944.


[n.p.] Contains addresses of persons in New York and Toronto, and other things. May have been used after 1939.


[n.p.] Concerns possible re-issue of "Men Without Art", with a new introduction as the only major change.


[London] Published in "Time and Tide", vol. 35, no.39, September 25, 1954; a review of Lionel Stevenson's "The Ordeal of George Meredith."


[London] Published as "A Note on Michael Ayrton" in "Nin", II, 3, August, 1950, p. 184-185.


[London] May be another draft of folder 10.


[n.p.] First person short story; heavily corrected and amended.


[London] The notes published in the second number of "Blast" are described as "The journal of a militant artist."


[Various places] Some notes in another's hand.


[Toronto] Notes and draft of a lecture delivered at Marygrove College, Detroit , on February 8, 1943. Included are 4 leaves torn for "Wyndham Lewis the Artist" for quotation.


[London] Portions of this commentary were printed in "Time Magazine", May 30, 1949, in an article discussing the retrospective show of Lewis' paintings at the Redfern.


[n.p.] Second leaf is a carbon copy of the first.


[London?] Text of an unpublished novel, with some holograph corrections and additions in Lewis' and G. Anne Lewis' hand. Lewis had sumitted the "miserable potboiler" to J. B. Pinker. Pages 1-100; lacks 98-99.


[London?] Text of an unpublished novel, with some holograph corrections and additions in Lewis' and G. Anne Lewis' hand. Lewis had sumitted the "miserable potboiler" to J. B. Pinker. Pages 101-200.


[London?] Text of an unpublished novel, with some holograph corrections and additions in Lewis' and G. Anne Lewis' hand. Lewis had sumitted the "miserable potboiler" to J. B. Pinker. Pages 201-300.


[London?] Text of an unpublished novel, with some holograph corrections and additions in Lewis' and G. Anne Lewis' hand. Lewis had sumitted the "miserable potboiler" to J. B. Pinker. Pages 301-400.


[London?] Text of an unpublished novel, with some holograph corrections and additions in Lewis' and G. Anne Lewis' hand. Lewis had sumitted the "miserable potboiler" to J. B. Pinker. Pages 401-518.


[Windsor] Notes for a lecture delivered at Assumption College. 17 leaves in hand of Lewis; 2 leaves typed.


[Toronto?] The TM and TM[copy] contain corrections in Lewis' hand. Published in the "Wyndham Lewis in Canada" number of "Canadian Literature".


[London] Printed questionnaire with comments by Lewis on his view of poetry, methods of composition, politics, etc.


[London?] Odd notations and names; connected with art exhibitions for the most part.


[London] Review written for the "Times Literary Supplement" of Harry Slochower's "No Voice is Ever Lost."


[London] Notes are from 1933 and 1934.


[New York] Envelope is maked VERY IMPORTANT, Keep; in Lewis' hand.


[London?] Spiral notebook with quotations which relate to Romanticism vs. Classicism discussions in "Man Without Art". In English, French and German.


[n.p.] Bound notebook with 36 pages used; many other pages blank. Writing mostly done by G. Anne Lewis with miscellaneous notes by Lewis. An unidentified piece of his writing is pasted inside the front cover. Also contains brief passages of letters of C. R. Nevinson; and whole letters to Lewis and G. Anne from Charles Edward Lewis.


[London] Listing of conferences and occurrences concerned with the 1932 re-issue by Harmsworth of "The Enemy of the Stars".


[n.p.] Little phrases written by Lewis on scraps of paper.


[n.p.]


[London] In the hand of Agnes Bedford.


[St. Louis] Concerns the sittings during Lewis' stay in St. Louis.


[n.p.]


[n.p.] Extracted from Lewis' personal copy of the Leavis work.


[Windsor] A detailed account of the requirements and execution of this commission can be found in Walter Michel's "Wyndham Lewis Paintings and Drawings", p. 345.


[London] Contains notes and addresses.


[n.p.]


[n.p.] Poem written on back of letter in German from Richard Meyer to "Fritzchen", dated 24.11.05; Hamburg.


[n.p.] Unidentified fragments in which Lewis claims that the American achievements in the visual arts do not match those in literature, with the exception of Whistler.


[n.p.] Draft of "American Melting Pot"?


[London?] Uncomplete? draft of poem/song.


[London?] About civilization and culture in cities.


[n.p.] An article on men, machines and art. Similar in subject matter to TM "Shropshire Lads and Robots", 1933.


[n.p.]


[Windsor?] A Lecture delivered by Lewis at the City Art Museum of St. Louis, February 18, 1944.


[London?]Portions of a variant text of this essay was published in 1927 as "The Wild Body." This incomplete version is basically as published in the May 5, 1910 issue of "The New Age."


[n.p.] Introduction as "Super-nature Versus Super-real", to "Wyndham Lewis the Artist".


[London?] Portions of an essay dealing with post-war social change in Great Britain and the extablishment of the red brick universities.


[Toronto?] Variant texts of an analysis of Lewis' political and social views in the 1930's, and subsequent changes in his opinions. The first leaf of one typescript bears alternate titles in Lewis' hand.


[London] Holograph draft in G. Anne Lewis' hand, and typescript copy of reviews published in "The Hudson Review", vol. 8, no. 4, December 1956.


[London] Portions of the manuscript are in the hand of G. Anne Lewis.


[Windsor] Notes for a group of ten lectures delivered in the summer session, 1943 of Assumption College, Windsor, Ontario, Canada.


[n.p.] A third of the page is typed, the rest is written in the hand of G. Anne Lewis.


[London] Published in "Encounter", vol. 6, no. 2, February 1956.


[London] Published in "Encounter", vol. 6, no. 2, February 1956.


[n.p.] A group of ealy, unpublished poems by Wyndham Lewis. The material is accompanied by an envelope in which the typed copies were originally enclosed. A note by Lewis, dated October 1942 on the envelope, from Toronto, states: "... It is certainly not my intention to have these not very interesting early efforts published..."


[London?] Also under hearding "American Poems".


[London] A review of the book by Erwin G. Christensen.


[n.p.] Concerns art's relation to the object it represents. See also the typescript, filed with his AM & TM "The Grafton Group", 1914. On verso is and advertisement for "The Tyro" magazine to be published April 1921.


[n.p.] Found in the papers of Mrs. Lewis.


[n.p.] Seems to be a character study and dialogue development.


[Windsor?] Identified in Lewis' hand as "Chatham Lecture", delivered at Chatham, Ontario, Canada.


[n.p.] With proposals for plates and other illustrations.


[n.p.]


[n.p.] Unidentified fragments, with a note in the hand of Mrs. Lewis: "Part II. Blasting & Bombardiering."


[Toronto] A Bound notebook with an introductory essay for a proposed book to deal with the nature of "public" spirit vs. the individual defined as "lone wolf" - includes a justification of certain pre-war attitudes.


[London?]


[n.p.]


[Toronto] Radio address based on the general argument of Lewis' "Anglosaxony". Identified on the first leaf in Lewis' hand.


[London] Published in "Shenandoah", vol. 4, nos. 2-3, Summer/Autumn 1953.


[Windsor] Opening leaves of an account of his life during the 1930's in England 9with commentary on illness and hospitalization ) and the economic pressures which forced him to come to the United States.


[Ottawa?] Written on the back of an evelope addressed to Lewis in Ottawa.


[Windsor?] This lecture was given 2 January 1943 and reprinted in "Wyndham Lewis on Art", 366-80.


[Windsor?] Notes and outline for a lecture given January 2, 1943, at Assumption College, Windsor, Canada. Published in "Wyndham Lewis on Art" p. 366.


[London] Response to Melville's unfavourable survey of Lewis' career, "Portrait of the Artist, no.7: Wyndham Lewis", which appeared in "Art, News & Review", I, 7 (7 May 1949), 1, 3.


[n.p.] Exhibition review.


[n.p.] Unidentified fragment not found in "Wyndham Lewis the Artist" or "Wyndham Lewis on Art", about expressionism, cubism, and futurism.


[n.p.] A review for the "New Statesman", April 7, 1951, of "The Letters of Exra Pound", ed. by D. D. Paige (London, Faber & Faber, 1951)


[n.p.] For a book of the smae name which was to be published Autumn 1941 by George Viscount Carlow's Corvinus Press.


[n.p.] Notes and draft of a lecture delivered at the Foxcroft School, Middleburg, Virginia.


[London] Published as "The Courtland Memorial Exhibition". In "Wyndham Lewis on Art", p. 431-432. Originally appeared in "The Listener", XXXIX, June 10, 1948, p. 944.


[London?] Typescript made in the 1950's, of an unpublished short story.


[n.p.] Apparently a late TM, with annotations in Mrs. Lewis' hand. A shortened version of this is published in "Wyndham Lewis on Art", p. 56-57.


[n.p.] A lecture on T. S. Eliot's "cultured person".


[n.p.] Galley proof with corrections in Lewis' hand. Published in "The Listener', January, 19, 1950.


[London] Contains a review of Augustus John's work.


[London] Contains a review of Koofi Antubam's and Denis Williams's work.


[London] A review of Jacob Epstein's work.


[London] Exhibition by Robert Colquhoun is the main topic of this group of reviews.


[London] Discusses many artists including Julian Trevelyan, William Scott, Ceri Richars and Henry Moore.


London; Discusses many artists including Merlyn Evans, Richard Eurich and David Bomberg.


London; Discusses many artists including Francis Bacon, Giorgio de Chirico, and Andre Bicat.


London; Discusses many artists including David Bomberg, Michael Ayrton and others.


London; Discusses many artists including M. Reynold Arnould, John Craxton and Mark Gertler.


London; Discusses many artists including J. Leslie Wright and Adrian Ryan.


London; Discusses many artists including Ethel Walker, Francis Bacon, and Augustus John.


London; Discusses many artists including Eric Peskett, Desmond Morris, and Henry Fuseli.


London; Discusses many artists including Will Rothenstein, Arthur Tooth and Stanley Spencer


[London] With holograph corrections. A caustic attack on the R. A. Published in "Contancet", May/June 1950, pp. 22-25.


[London] Synopsis, partial drafts and transcriptions


[London] Printers copy of section I


[London] Printers copy of section II.


London; Manuscript in Lewis' hand and G. Anne Lewis' hand.


London; Manuscript in Lewis' hand and G. Anne Lewis' hand.


London; Manuscript in Lewis' hand and G. Anne Lewis' hand.


London; Manuscript in Lewis' hand and G. Anne Lewis' hand.


London; Manuscript in Lewis' hand and G. Anne Lewis' hand.


London; Manuscript in Lewis' and G. Anne Lewis" hand. Notes and rejected material.


London; Manuscript in Lewis' and G. Anne Lewis" hand. Notes and rejected material.


[n.p.] An expanded version of this TM appears as "A Cancelled Forward" to the Black Sparrow edition of "Rotting Hill", 1986, pp. 343-349.


[London] Drafts with corrections, notes and introductory material. Published by Methuen in 1951; in 1952 by Regnery.


[London] Drafts with corrections, notes and introductory material. Published by Methuen in 1951; in 1952 by Regnery.


[London] Drafts with corrections, notes and introductory material. Published by Methuen in 1951; in 1952 by Regnery.


[London] Drafts with corrections, notes and introductory material. Published by Methuen in 1951; in 1952 by Regnery.


[London] Drafts with corrections, notes and introductory material. Published by Methuen in 1951; in 1952 by Regnery.


[London] Empty envelope on which Lewis has written, "Stuff to be kept for "Rot Book". Presumably used for notes to "Rotting Hill."


[London] Drafts with corrections, notes and introductory material. Published by Methuen in 1951; in 1952 by Regnery.


[London] Drafts with corrections, notes and introductory material. Published by Methuen in 1951; in 1952 by Regnery.


[London] Drafts with corrections, notes and introductory material. Published by Methuen in 1951; in 1952 by Regnery.


[London] Drafts with corrections, notes and introductory material. Published by Methuen in 1951; in 1952 by Regnery.


[London] Drafts, fragments, clippings and proofs.


[London] Galley proofs A


[London] Galley proofs B


[London] Galley proofs C


[London] Galley proofs D


[London] With hand written corrections. Introduction and Chapters [I] - IX


[London] With hand written corrections. Chapters X - XIX


[London] With hand written corrections. Chapters XX - XXIX


[London] With hand written corrections. Chapters XXX - XXXVII & Envoi


[London] Fragment from "Rude Assignment"


[London] Versions of the foreword to "Satire and Fiction"


[London] Portions of the published text, with holograph and typescript amendments and changes. Possibly revised by Lewis for a later re-issue?


[London] Notes and versions of a lecture delivered at Harvard University.


[London] Bound scrapbook with 15 pages used. Many of the notations and clippings deal with "exotic" locale, slang expressions, etc.


[n.p.] Bound scrapbook with 6 leaves used and a number of loose clippings. Clippings are mostly portraits and photographs of notable political figures and writers. The pictures appear to date from the 1930's and 1940's; a number were clipped for "Time" magazine.


[London] Bound scrapbook with clippings and notations in the hand of G. Anne Lewis. Some clippings pasted in and others are loose.


[London] Bound scrapbook with notations and newspaper clippings; chiefly concerned with books and literary matters; using only 7 leaves.


[n.p.] Addresses both in Canada and Europe. Many of Lewis' relatives.


[London] Text of article, published in "The Listener, vol. 45, no. 1158, May 10, 1951, announcing his blindness and the discontinuation of his articles on contemporary art.


[London] Article published in the "Evening Standard" of 28 April 1922 as "The Long and the Short of It" concering fashions in skirt lengths. With holograph corrections.


[New York] Drafts and notes of a lecture delivered on February 14, 1940 at Columbia University. Included is a printed flyer advertising the lecture.


[London] First leaf bears title "The Machine Poets"; a note in Lewis' hand states that this text was written for "Everyman." Text actually published in two installments in "New Britain", nos. 33 & 34 of 3 & 10 January 1934.


[n.p.] Notes, synopsis and opening chapter of this proposed novel with deals with a successful British painter who leaves London, his wife, his establishment-approved painting style for Rome. A "beautiful post-debutante", he "begins painting the most peculiar picture."


[London] Carbon of the article printed in "Time and Tide", 15, no.46, Nov.17, 1934. A study, primarily of Edith Sitwell, emphasizing the role of the three Sitwells as publicists and poseurs.


[London] Typescript of "Snooty Baronet" submitted by Lewis to Coburn Gilman, who attempted unsuccessfully to find an American publisher for the novel. Heavily annotated by Lewis.


[London] Typescript of "Snooty Baronet" submitted by Lewis to Coburn Gilman, who attempted unsuccessfully to find an American publisher for the novel. Heavily annotated by Lewis.


[London] Typescript of "Snooty Baronet" submitted by Lewis to Coburn Gilman, who attempted unsuccessfully to find an American publisher for the novel. Heavily annotated by Lewis.


[London] Typescript of "Snooty Baronet" submitted by Lewis to Coburn Gilman, who attempted unsuccessfully to find an American publisher for the novel. Heavily annotated by Lewis.


[London] Typescript of "Snooty Baronet" submitted by Lewis to Coburn Gilman, who attempted unsuccessfully to find an American publisher for the novel. Heavily annotated by Lewis.


[London] Typescript of "Snooty Baronet" submitted by Lewis to Coburn Gilman, who attempted unsuccessfully to find an American publisher for the novel. Heavily annotated by Lewis.


[London] Typescript of "Snooty Baronet" submitted by Lewis to Coburn Gilman, who attempted unsuccessfully to find an American publisher for the novel. Heavily annotated by Lewis.


[London] Typescript of "Snooty Baronet" submitted by Lewis to Coburn Gilman, who attempted unsuccessfully to find an American publisher for the novel. Heavily annotated by Lewis.


[London] Typescript of "Snooty Baronet" submitted by Lewis to Coburn Gilman, who attempted unsuccessfully to find an American publisher for the novel. Heavily annotated by Lewis.


[London] Typescript of "Snooty Baronet" submitted by Lewis to Coburn Gilman, who attempted unsuccessfully to find an American publisher for the novel. Heavily annotated by Lewis.


[Toronto,London] Manuscript material in the hands of Wyndham and G. Anne Lewis. It appears portions of the novel were begun in Canada; the bulk of the work was completed in London in the 1950's. Both AM & TM are heavily amended.Accompanying material includes extensive groups of material dealing with individual characterizations in the text, newspaper clippings and lists of American/Canadian slang and idioms.


[Toronto,London] Manuscript material in the hands of Wyndham and G.

Anne Lewis. It appears portions of the novel were begun in Canada; the bulk of the work was completed in London in the 1950's. Both AM & TM are heavily amended.Accompanying material includes extensive groups of material dealing with individual characterizations in the text, newspaper clippings and lists of American/Canadian slang and idioms.


[Toronto,London] Originally titled "You Are Not By Any Chance a Fool My Son? Manuscript material in the hands of Wyndham and G. Anne Lewis. It appears portions of the novel were begun in Canada; the bulk of the work was completed in London in the 1950's. Both AM & TM are heavily amended.Accompanying material includes extensive groups of material dealing with individual characterizations in the text, newspaper clippings and lists of American/Canadian slang and idioms.


[Toronto,London] Originally titled "You Are Not By Any Chance a Fool My Son? Manuscript material in the hands of Wyndham and G. Anne Lewis. It appears portions of the novel were begun in Canada; the bulk of the work was completed in London in the 1950's. Both AM & TM are heavily amended.Accompanying material includes extensive groups of material dealing with individual characterizations in the text, newspaper clippings and lists of American/Canadian slang and idioms.


[Toronto,London] Originally titled "You Are Not By Any Chance a Fool My Son? Manuscript material in the hands of Wyndham and G. Anne Lewis. It appears portions of the novel were begun in Canada; the bulk of the work was completed in London in the 1950's. Both AM & TM are heavily amended.Accompanying material includes extensive groups of material dealing with individual characterizations in the text, newspaper clippings and lists of American/Canadian slang and idioms.


[Toronto,London] Originally titled "You Are Not By Any Chance a Fool My Son? Manuscript material in the hands of Wyndham and G. Anne Lewis. It appears portions of the novel were begun in Canada; the bulk of the work was completed in London in the 1950's. Both AM & TM are heavily amended.Accompanying material includes extensive groups of material dealing with individual characterizations in the text, newspaper clippings and lists of American/Canadian slang and idioms.


[Toronto,London] Variant conclusion; unpublished. Originally titled "You Are Not By Any Chance a Fool My Son? Manuscript material in the hands of Wyndham and G. Anne Lewis. It appears portions of the novel were begun in Canada; the bulk of the work was completed in London in the 1950's. Both AM & TM are heavily amended.Accompanying material includes extensive groups of material dealing with individual characterizations in the text, newspaper clippings and lists of American/Canadian slang and idioms.


[Toronto,London] Originally titled "You Are Not By Any Chance a Fool My Son? Manuscript material in the hands of Wyndham and G. Anne Lewis. It appears portions of the novel were begun in Canada; the bulk of the work was completed in London in the 1950's. Both AM & TM are heavily amended.Accompanying material includes extensive groups of material dealing with individual characterizations in the text, newspaper clippings and lists of American/Canadian slang and idioms.


[Toronto,London] Originally titled "You Are Not By Any Chance a Fool My Son? Manuscript material in the hands of Wyndham and G. Anne Lewis. It appears portions of the novel were begun in Canada; the bulk of the work was completed in London in the 1950's. Both AM & TM are heavily amended.Accompanying material includes extensive groups of material dealing with individual characterizations in the text, newspaper clippings and lists of American/Canadian slang and idioms.


[Toronto,London] Originally titled "You Are Not By Any Chance a Fool My Son? Manuscript material in the hands of Wyndham and G. Anne Lewis. It appears portions of the novel were begun in Canada; the bulk of the work was completed in London in the 1950's. Both AM & TM are heavily amended.Accompanying material includes extensive groups of material dealing with individual characterizations in the text, newspaper clippings and lists of American/Canadian slang and idioms.


[Toronto,London] Originally titled "You Are Not By Any Chance a Fool My Son? Manuscript material in the hands of Wyndham and G. Anne Lewis. It appears portions of the novel were begun in Canada; the bulk of the work was completed in London in the 1950's. Both AM & TM are heavily amended.Accompanying material includes extensive groups of material dealing with individual characterizations in the text, newspaper clippings and lists of American/Canadian slang and idioms.


[Toronto,London] Originally titled "You Are Not By Any Chance a Fool My Son? Manuscript material in the hands of Wyndham and G. Anne Lewis. It appears portions of the novel were begun in Canada; the bulk of the work was completed in London in the 1950's. Both AM & TM are heavily amended.Accompanying material includes extensive groups of material dealing with individual characterizations in the text, newspaper clippings and lists of American/Canadian slang and idioms.


[n.p.] Sonnet published in "Rude Assignment".


[n.p.] Different from "A Spanish Household".


[n.p.] Manuscript includes two holograph leaves and text (with corrections in Lewis' hand) transcribed in typescript, with cargon copy. First published in "The Tramp: An Open Air Magazine", June/July 1910.


[Toronto] Lewis had been commissioned by McLean, a Canadian industrialist, to paint his portrait.


[Toronto] Includes 2 newspaper clippings.


[London] Parts I-IV on the introductions to "Wyndham Lewis the Artist". For conclusions (Pts. V &VI) see TM "Painting as a Sport".


[n.p.] Xerox copy "Synopsis" of "Trial of Man"[?]


[London] A synopsis of a novel to be called "Chateau Box" 9or "Hotel Chateau Rex"); "the war as seen from a colony. Relatedd to "Self Condemned", Lewis states that "the hero of the book is the "Hotel" and the themes described are general.There are no references to any pivotal characters or to a protagonist, as Rene Harding. With minor corrections in Lewis' hand.


[n.p.] Synopsis of a short story or novel set in an imaginary city-state in Renaissance Italy. In the hand of Agnes Bedford.


[London?, Toronto?, Windsor?] An outline of a novel set in the Italian Renaissance, centering on the development of warfare technology, though otherwise a fairly conventional "historical novel."


[London] Five of the eight stories listed appeared in "Unlucky for Pringle."


[n.p.] Probably a talk given by Lewis on B.B.C. radio. The draft has corrections in Lewis' hand.


[n.p.] Appears to be an outline from the book to aid in the adaption of the storyline to another format.


[London] Additional dialogue composed for the B.B.C. adaptation of "Tarr" made in 1956. The draft manuscript is in the hand of Agnes Bedford.


[n.p.] Possibly a radio play, characters speaking have been identifies as Bertha and Kreisler.


[London] Lewis was asked to contribute to the newspaper, "Die Tat", published at Zurich, on the political and social future for post-war Europe. Lewis predicts, barring an atomic disaster, the creation of an international state. Text in German and English.


[London?]Typescript has corrections in Mrs. Lewis' hand.


[n.p.] Apparently a new introduction, never completed, for the 1957 Beacon Press paperback edition. The AM is in the hand of Agnes Bedford, and was found with letters of John Reid to G. Anne Lewis.


[London] Published in "Wyndham Lewis on Art", p. 381-392.


[London] Copy in the hand of G. Anne Lewis. Notes refer to "The Apes of God", "Joint", and "The Childermass".


[London] Not in Lewis' hand. Some extracts from English and American Reviews for "Time and Western Man"


[London]Pages 1-150. Compsed of holograph, partial typescript and portions of printed proof. Typescript and proofs heavily corrected and amended in Lewis' hand.


[London]Pages 151-300. Compsed of holograph, partial typescript and portions of printed proof. Typescript and proofs heavily corrected and amended in Lewis' hand.


[London]Pages 301-457. Compsed of holograph, partial typescript and portions of printed proof. Typescript and proofs heavily corrected and amended in Lewis' hand.


[n.p.] Holograph manuscript has a few paragraphs in Lewis' hand, others are in the hand of G. Anne Lewis.


[London] Includes synopses, charts, notes and fragments. Manuscript material for an unpublished novel dealing with the life of an English artist/aesthetician.


[London] Manuscript material for an unpublished novel dealing with the life of an English artist/aesthetician.


[London] Manuscript material for an unpublished novel dealing with the life of an English artist/aesthetician.


[London] Includes synopses, charts, notes and fragments. Manuscript material for an unpublished novel dealing with the life of an English artist/aesthetician.


[London] Includes synopses, charts, notes and fragments. Manuscript material for an unpublished novel dealing with the life of an English artist/aesthetician.


[London] Includes synopses, charts, notes and fragments. Manuscript material for an unpublished novel dealing with the life of an English artist/aesthetician.


[London] Includes synopses, charts, notes and fragments. Manuscript material for an unpublished novel dealing with the life of an English artist/aesthetician.


[London] Xerox of copyflo done for Dr. W. Michel, publisher, and returned to RMC.


[London] Draft in Lewis' hand with transcription in G. Anne Lewis' hand plus typescript version.


[London] Two fragments, both dealing with themes of sadism/homosexuality. One fragment concerns a public school headmaster who submits to a flogging; the other "the usual little Yankee pederast-pot."


[London] Foreword to the catalogue of the "Exhibition of Paintings and Drawings by Wyndham Lewis" held at the Leicester Galleries, April 1921.


[London] Galley proofs of a collection of short stories


[n.p.] Fragments and notes not identified.


[London] Identified on first page as written for Doubleday & Co., New York. Includes account of contemporary habits as well as retrospective study of career.


[London] Page 6 with carbon copy.


[London] Appears in substanially altered form in "Round the Galleries" in "Wyndham Lewis on Art", p. 418-421.


[Toronto] Commentary by Lewis on "The Vulgar Streak", relating it among other things to Stendhal's "Le Rouge et le Noir". May be a draft to accompany the British edition while Lewis was seeking an American publisher for the novel.


Toronto; Includes a listing and partial transcription of reviews of "The Vulgar Streak" which appeared in English periodicals.


[n.p.] With holograph corrections. Published in "Arts and Letters", n.s. 2, no.1.


[n.p.] Short story, with minor corrections in the hand of G. Anne Lewis.


[London] Reviews of exhibtion of Gerard David and others at the Lecister Galleries. A portion of this draft appears in "Round the Galleries in "Whydham Lewis the Artist".


[London] Identifies on first leaf in Lewis' hand as a radio address delivered in June 1938. Concerned with contemporary British distaste for satire.


[New York?] Title supplied in Lewis' hand. A press release, written by Lewis himself, describing his career ... "one of the most remarkable as also one of the most controversial figures in the world of art and letters..."


[London] Appeared as a serial story in no. 1 of "The Tyro", 1921.


[London] Shorty story, partially in the hand of G. Anne Lewis. Material also includes a variant opening chapter entitled "Minor Lions" and a four-leaf "Book Ending."


[London] Draft, partially in holograph and partially in typescript, and annotated typescript copy. With notes fragments, and clippings.


[London] Draft, partially in holograph and partially in typescript, and annotated typescript copy. With notes fragments, and clippings.


[London] Draft, partially in holograph and partially in typescript, and annotated typescript copy. With notes fragments, and clippings.


[London] Draft, partially in holograph and partially in typescript, and annotated typescript copy. With notes fragments, and clippings.


[London] Draft, partially in holograph and partially in typescript, and annotated typescript copy. With notes fragments, and clippings.


[London] Draft, partially in holograph and partially in typescript, and annotated typescript copy. With notes fragments, and clippings.


[London?] A listing, made by Lewis, of published and unpublished writings. Dates from the same period in which he compiled the listing of Paintings and drawings before going to the front in World War I.


[London] Listing made by G. Anne Lewis probably for an exhibition on Lewis by the National Book League.


[London] Written to accompany the exhibition of paintings by Lewis and other vorticist artists held at the Tate Gallery in 1956.


[London] Review of exhibition "Art in Industry" at Burlington House. Appeared in "Commercial Art & Industry," XVIII, 105, 6 March 1935, p. 83-86.


[St. Louis] Possibly drawn up by Felix Giovanelli and Marshall McLuhan as a press release to aid Lewis in obtaining portrait commissions and lecturing positions.


[London] Newspaper clippings of two letters by Lewis about the rejected portrait of T. S. Eliot. They were reprinted in "Wyndham Lewis the Artist From "Blast" to Burlington House."


[London] Includes printed texts from no. 2 of "The Tyro," with changes and additions in Lewis' hand, which sserved as the basis for portions of it.


[n.p.] Typescript version with minor corrections in the hand of G. Anne Lewis.


[London] Draft partially transcribed in the hand of G. Anne Lewis. With commentary on contemporary art and music.


[Various places] This material includes fragments of publlished and unpublished material, notes made on reading, material related to the preparation of works for publication, word lists, and many other notes.


[n.p.] Poem, with autograph correction.


[London] Published in "Shenandoah", 7, no.1, autumn 1955.


[n.p.] A poem.


[n.p.] Autobiographical essay explaining the background of the writing of "Dark Emperor".


[n.p.] A poem; begins with a quote and its translation.


[n.p.] A poem; begins with a quote and its translation.


[n.p.] A poem.


[Norfolk] "My parents were poor, but I was a bright boy..." Included is an ALS from Beevers to Donald Eddy, Cornell University Library, dated April 29, 1975, stating the contents were "notes" on Lewis.


[New Haven?] Annotated galley proofs of review published in the "Saturday Review of Literature."


[West Sussex, England] List of Wyndham Lewis paintings and bibliography.


[West Sussex, England] A manuscript for an exhibition catalogue.


[West Sussex, England] A manuscript for an exhibition catalogue.


Bolton; Found in papers of G. Anne Lewis.


[n.p.] With numerous handwritten revisions. Contains 11 preliminary leaves, & 322 numbered pages, except p. 155 is missing. Published by Cassell, London, in 1972.


[n.p.] Copied from the original lent by Edward H. Rogers.


[n.p.] Questions concerning biographical data during Lewis' residence in the Unitedd States and Canada. Marginal notes in G. Anne Lewis' hand.


[n.p.] Sent to G. Anne Lewis to advise her of Cassidy's plan regarding Lewis research.


[n.p.] Cassidy's plan for writing Lewis biography.


[n.p.] Cassidy's essay on the correspondence with two page introduction and footnotes to explain the details in the letters.


[n.p.]


London; Script for radio broadcast.


[London] Commentary by Eliot on sitting as a portrait subject for Lewis. Partially printed in "Time Magazine", May 30, 1949. Included the article as printed.


[London] Article on Lewis' "Monstre Gai" with a few holograph corrections.


[London?]Galley proofs of the article which is a review of two books by Alfred N. Whiteheard. Unpublished? Not in Gallup.


[London?] Published in the September 1918 issue of the "Little Review", v.5; and in the 1919 Hogarth Press 1st edition of the "Poems". With minor notations in Eliot's hand.


[Norwich?] Poem, orignally enclosed in a letter addressed to Lewis. On a single leaf with the TMS "Paris, 1953".


[n.p.] Abridged version of folder 28, "No Quarter". Gift of Bernard Lafourcade. The manuscript contains the story of Mrs. Marjorie Hemming and her acquaintance with Wyndham Lewis.


[n.p.] Accompanied by letter explaining that the manuscript was willed to Cornell by Mrs. Marjorie Hemming. The manuscript contains the story of her acquaintance with Wyndham Lewis.


[London?] With reminiscences and critism.


London; Asking each group member to contribute to the rental fee.


[London?] Includes biographical and bibliographical material dating to 1935, as well as a listing of paintings and drawings by Lewis.


[n.p.] Appears to be a radio broadcast script.


[London] With autograph corrections.


[Fordingbridge] Subtitled: "Or the Autobiography". Originally enclosed in a letter to Lewis, 5 October 1942.


[Paris?] Fragment of text; carbon has been "signed" not in Joyce's hand.


Vancouver, B.C.; A disquistion on literature originally sent to Wyndham Lewis.


Montreal; A poem; also includes TM "The Arian Heresy", March 7, 1957, Montreal. Author is questionable.


[n.p.] Copies of reviews from "The Library Journal", "The Houston Post", the "Pasadena Star News" and the "Vermont Sunday News", among others.


London; A list saying whom sent and text of message.


[London] First published in "The Nation", December 18, 1943. Second leaf bears a notation in Lewis' hand, on verso. Mimeographed.


[n.p.] Unsure about author; found in the papers of Mrs. Lewis.


[n.p.] Appears to be a catalogue.


[n.p.] Mrs. Lewis typed this transcription of K. Lechmere's introduction to Wyndham Lewis; Mrs. Lewis' source is not clear.


[n.p.]


[Canada]


[Canada] Daily notes of weather and activities.


[n.p.] Includes instructions for making a knitted jacket and a brief expense account.


[n.p.] Poem


[n.p.] From "Reveries of an Old Smoker"


[n.p.] From "Reveries of an Old Smoker"; essay on the Bonaparte family


[Nunda, New York] Copy of mimeographed story from the "Nunda News"


[n.p.] Poetic dialogue, written for the "Tasmania" when it crossed the date line on a voyage to Australia.


[n.p.] From "Reveries of an Old Smoker"


[n.p.] From "Reveries of an Old Smoker. Title on first leaf appears as "Voyage Over"


[n.p.] With corrections in holograph.


[New York] A note in Lewis' hand states that this review was "rejected by the editor of the Trotskyite review of New York."


[London?] Small notebook with 12 leaves of writing. Mostly household expenses and one journal type entry for June 8.


[London?] Small notebooks with 19 leaves used. Mostly notes but one long journal type entry for Sept. 19.


[London] Very small diary; randomly used, nothing written after March 10.


[London] Small diary, randomly used. Front cover says: The Catholic Diary 1959.


[London] Very small diary, largely unused after April.


[London] Contains address and expense notations.


[London] Very small diary with few notations and a few addresses at the end.


[London] Very small diary; very little use except for figure notations.


[London] Very small diary, not used after August 24.


[London] Very small diary; little used.


[London] Very small diary; few entries.


[London] Notes about her relationship with Bridson as well as notes taken during a B.B.C. broadcast.


[n.p.]


[London] One handwritten copy and one typed copy, same story, different versions.


[Torquay] World wide addresses; friends and publishers, etc.


[Torquauy] Smaller book with addresses of friends, etc.


[n.p.] Lists of 1: Articles and Lectures; and 2: Correspondents.


Torquay; With 4 typed leaves of same text.


[n.p.]


[n.p.]


[n.p.] Rules of grammar possibly used by Mrs. Lewis when typing manuscript.


[n.p.] Two leaves each from a different unknown source.


[n.p.] Accounts of various scenes with Dr. Fant, M.D. during the period when Lewis' tumor was detected.


[n.p.] With listing of paintings and expense notations.


[n.p.] Research of Lewis' life and family including tracing of the family tree to the early 1900's. Transcriptions of Lewis' letters to his mother during WWI and her responses.


[n.p.]


[n.p.] Listing of correspondents.


[n.p.] Various attempts to list the contents of Wyndham Lewis' library as well as original books and manuscripts owned by Mrs. Lewis.


[n.p.] Fragment of memoir which discusses her attempts to recover a trunk of documents left at the Pall Mall Safe Deposit during WWII.


[n.p.] Discusses a weekend spent with Mary Borden before WWII during which Ford and Hunt were there.


[n.p.] Appears to be a chronology of Lewis' work; mainly portraits.


[n.p.] Criticism and corrections of Geoffrey Wagner, "Wyndham Lewis: a Portrait of the Artist as the Enemy". Plus an AL[draft, fragment] from Mrs. Lewis to the publisher[?]


[n.p.] Royalties earned by reprint editions of "The Lion and the Fox" and "Rotting Hill"


[n.p.] Letters sent to publishers for permission to print Lewis material.


[n.p.] Some of these writing address specific statements and articles. The main subject being Nazism.


[n.p.]


London; Third article in a series. Other contributors were: R. A. Scott-James, E. W. F. Tomlin, and Geoffrey Grigson.


[Ingston upon Thames] Reminiscences of Lewis and his circle by Kenneth Marshall, who was associated with Zwemmer, and Lewis' publishing activities with the Arthur Press in the late 1920's and early 1930's.


Toronto; Reviews of the broadcasts by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation on August 21, 1955 as a segment of the series, "Critically Speaking."


[n.p.]Lawyer's list of possibly libellous sectionsof Wyndham Lewis' book "Rude Assignment". Included is an identification note by Cyril Fox.


[n.p.] Included is a 5 leaf AM of Wyndham Lewis' works. Unknown hand.


[London?] Pages 44-64 of the published work, "Beyond This Limit", issued by Jonathan Cape in 1935. Illustrated by Wyndham Lewis.


Rome; Corrections in the hand of Agnes Bedford.


[n.p.]Sketched in ink and coloured pencil.


[n.p.] Critical piece comparing the styles of T.S. Eliot, James Joyce, D. H. Lawrence, Wyndham Lewis and Virginia Woolf.


[Rapallo?] First published in "New Directions in Prose & Poetry", 6, 1941.


[Montreal?] Poem prompted by Pound's reading of "Self Condemned".


[Montreal] Originally enclosed in letter to Wyndham and G. Anne Lewis, 6 June 1956; signed "O.S. Tucker".


[n.p.] Inscribed "for Wyndham, Froanna and Agnes With Love Omar"


Montreal; Originally enclosed in letter to Lewis, December 23, 1956; signed "O.S. Tucker".


[n.p.] Also attributed to Dorothy Pound.


Montreal; Originally enclosed in letter to Lewis; signed "O.S. Tucker".


[Boston] Originally enclosed in letter to G. Anne Lewis, August 13, 1958; dedicated to her.


[n.p.] Poem found with letters to G. Anne Lewis.


Llanybri, Wales; Poem; originally enclosed with letter to Wyndham Lewis, 30 July 1948 which explains the poem.


[n.p.] Poem with holograph corrections.


Llanybri, Wales; Poem


[n.p.] List of graphic works by Lewis shown in a variety of exhibits around 1948 to 1954. Rogers copy xeroxed for Cornell. See 55.35.


[n.p.] Appears to be the list of papers from Mrs. Lewis' estate acquired by Cornell around 1980.


London; Possibly a draft of an introduction for the book Russell edited: "An Examination of Ezra Pound", NY, London, 1950.


[n.p.] Poem


[London] Second of a series. Other contributors were Richard March, E. W. F. Tomlin, and Geoffrey Grigson.


[n.p.] Holographic corrected version of this manuscript appears in Edith Sitwell's autogriography, "Taken Care of", as Chapter 11, "The Missing Collar". Included is a letter from Child and Child solicitors advising against publication.


[n.p.] Poem.


[Lindsell] A detailed account of the cooperative attempt to maintain a village school for children in the primary grades, despite the opposition of local Education Committee and the national government. An inspiration for "Parents and Horses" in "Rotting Hill".


[London] Poem


[London]Text of B.B.C. Third Programme address braodcast January 9, 1949. Lines from "One-Way Song" are quoted in text; with autograph corrections.


[London] With handwritten revisions. Published with furth revisions in the "Anthology", here titled: "Wyndham Lewis".


Loondon; First of a series. Other contributors were Geoffrey Grigson, Richard March and R. A. Scott-James.


[n.p.] Advertisement for Lewis pamphlets.


[London] Listing of galleries and paintings where Lewis had exhibitions. Same as 55.22.


London; This contribution was broadcast on April 30, 1935 as "The Freedom That Destroys Itself", and was printed as "V" in; the 1936 edition of "Freedom", published by Allen & Unwin. Lewis' copy signed by Philip S. Unwin.


London; Lewis' copy; signed by Allen a & Unwin.


London; Order for 30 copies of Enemy no.3, send to Kenneth Marshall of Zwemmer & Co. with typed copy and envelope.


London; Contract to publish the reprint.


London; Receipt to settle claims of Miss Mackusick arising out of his surrender of tenancy at Ashley Mansions.


New York; "As per attached Royalty Statement" (Not attached)


Torquay; Payment and receipt on statement plus hand notations of amounts.


Torquay; Payment and receipt on statement.


Torquay;


Southend-on-Sea; Lease for 26 Hillside Gardens, Highgate, London. Not signed.


[London] Publisher's advance information about Bridson's book on Wyndham Lewis political ideas.


[London] Market testing and research report for a production of "The Revenge for Love".


London; Performance scheduled for the third programme on week starting 17th June 1951.


[London] Giving listener's reactions to the programme.


[London] Listener's reactions to the programme.


London; Statement for payment of reproducing 3 Lewis drawings.


London; Payment for use of 2 illustrations by Lewis: "Blast" magazine cover and T.S. Eliot portrait.


London; Payment for use Wyndham Lewis material (not specified)


London; Statement and receipt for 19 pounds, 19 guineas


London; Assessment for painting and drawings at G. Anne Lewis' apartment for probate purposes. Signed Oliver F. Brown, Direcctor.


[London] Royalty statement for "Blasting and Bombardiering"


Toronto; Signed: H. W. Morrison


London; Between Wyndham Lewis and Cassell for "a novel to be written by the author". Unsigned.


London; Between Wyndham Lewis and Cassell for "a novel to be written by the author"; Signed Desmond Flower.


London; Between Wyndham Lewis and Cassell for "Satire and Fiction". Signed Newman Flower.


London; Six royalty statements for Wyndham Lewis books from April 30, 1934 to October 31, 1936; 4 for "Snooty Baronet" and 2 for "Men Without Art".


Ealing; Lewis' report for Forum IV, upper.


Ealing; Lewis' report for Forum IV, upper.


London; Signed by Chatto & Windus


London; Royalty statements for the Lewis books Chatto & Windus published from May 12, 1926 to Dec. 31, 1958.


London; Account from April 1, 1953 to March 31, 1954.


London; Account from April 1, 1956 to March 31, 1957.


London;


London; Statements from April 1, 1933 to March 31, 1934.


London; Listing Lewis' purchases.


London; Lewis' copy, signed by Chatto & Windus.


London; Lewis' copy, signed by Chatto & Windus.


London; Lewis' copy, signed by Chatto & Windus.


London; Lewis' copy, signed by Chatto & Windus.


London; Lewis' copy, signed by Chatto & Windus.


London; Lewis' copy, signed by Chatto & Windus.


London; Lewis' copy, signed by Chatto & Windus.


London; Agreement not fully completed; no title, no signatures. This was for "The Childermass".


London; Concerned "Paleface" and "The Diabolical Principle"; signed by Chatto & Windus.


London; Bill for assessing possible libel in an article in the "Times Literary Supplement".


Londonl Not signed.


New York; Giving U.S. rights to Covici.


Oakville, Ontario; Deed to Anne (Stuart) Lewis land in Oakville, Ontario.


London;


London; Bill for announcement about Lewis.


[Canada] Dr. strengthens glasses.


London; Contract to publish book.


London;


London; From January 1, 1938 to June 30, 1938.


London; Receipt to G. Anne Lewis for purchase of four Wyndham Lewis art works.


Garden City, NY; Lewis' copy; signed by Doubleday & Co.


London; Renewal of subscription invoice and signed receipt thereof.


London; Three varients of the agreement; one signed.


London; Work not named; signed by Editions Poetry London.


[n.p.] Pages 3 through 6, mentioning Lewis book "The Revenge for Love".


[n.p.] No. 415; talks about Lewis' "The Revenge for Love".


London; Lewis' copy; signed by Eveleigh, Nash & Grayson.


London; Lewis' copy; signed by Eveleigh, Nash & Grayson.


London; Lewis' copy; signed by Eyre & Spottiswoode


London; Lewis' royalties from "Blasing and Bombardiering".


London; Lewis' copy; signed by Faber & Faber.


Portland, ME; Receipt for Charles E. Lewis for payment of dues for the Bosworth Post.


Portland, ME; Receipt for Charles E. Lewis for payment of dues for the Bosworth Post.


London; With second statement for Oct. 15, 1932.


London; Royalties for "The Apes of God" and "Filibusters of Barbary" from June 30, 1932 to December 31, 1933.


London; Statements for "The Apes of God" and "Filibusters of Barbary", Dec. 23 and 31, 1933.


[Various places] Miscellaneous document from Lewis' WWI service, including ration cards, movement orders, and hospitalization papers.


London; Concerning Lewis' "Doom of Youth" and alledged libellous charges of homosexuality.


London; Concerning Lewis' "Doom of Youth" and alledged libellous charges of homosexuality.


London; Concerning Lewis' "Doom of Youth" and alledged libellous charges of homosexuality.


London; Kate Elizabeth Lechmere is sueing Lewis for 97 pounds sterling.


London; Thomas Girdwood MacFie sueing D. B. Wyndham Lewis[sic] claiming damages based upon "Filibusters in Barbary".


London; Issued by Chatto & Windus to Wyndham Lewis for breaching his contract of "TheChildermass" and certain other of Lewis' works.


London;


[n.p.] Anne Stuart Lewis [mother of Wyndham] seeking information on Henry Benson Stuart, died Jan.31, 1897.


London; Agreement to publish Lewis' work. Lewis' copy, signed by Groschen.


London; Lewis' copy of agreement, signed by Hale.


London; Agreement to publish Lewis' "next novel". Lewis' copy, signed by Hale.


London; Agreement signed by Harcourt and Lewis.


London; Agreement signed by Harcourt and Lewis.


New York; Agreement for the American edition; signed by Harper.


London; Payment which gives serial rights to "Europe and Her American Baby" to Harper.


New York; Records for Lewis' books "The Art of Being Rules" and "The Lion and the Fox".


New York; Agreement signed by both parties; however, Lewis' signature is cut out.


London; Title originally was "Story of a Career", published as "Rude Assignment". Lewis' copy, signed by Hutchinson.


London; Agreement signed in 1947 not fulfilled by 1952 so contract was cancelled.


London; Original agreement, signed by Hutchinson.


London; Concerning "Rude Assignment" and "Victory of Albert Temple". Reflects return payment for advance of "Victory..."


[n.p.] Pedigree for Leewis' dog, also known as Jo-Jo.


London; Agreement signed by Cape.


London; Novel not named, signed by Cape.


London;


London;


London; Miscellaneous papers from King's Theatre; wage receipts, payments and contract.


London; Agreement to publish with revisions, initialed.


London; Bank document giving power of exhequer to Lewis and Lechmere upon the incorporation of the Cubist Art Center.


London; Included with balance sheet is TLS to Lewis, dated 14th February, 1956 dealing with sale of art works; another balance sheet, undated and a list of Lewis' art works with prices.


London; Listing of advances paid Lewis, paintings sold, and letters to Lewis.


Haunell; Lewis' mother's will, leaving all to him except for a small bequeath to one other.


Montreal; Pass book with various other letters, receipts and permission documents.


Buffalo, NY; Signed by Anne but rest of note in the hand of Charles E. Lewis. Probably dated by him in Buffalo and forwarded for signing to England.


London; Receipt for the sum of $500.00.


St. John, N.B.; A withdrawal on Nov. 1, 1887.


London; Photostats, declaring Percy Wyndham Lewis' date of birth, November 18, 1882.


Buffalo, NY;


Portland, ME; Payment to Bosworth Post, no. 2.


Portland, ME; Payment to Bosworth Post, no. 2.


Torquay; Check for 30 pounds to Inland Revenue.


[n.p.] Annual bidgets and expenses.


Torquay; Payment of 49 pounds, 16 pence


Cardiff; Worksheet for Anne Lewis with computations for the year.


Sussex; Correspondence dealing with her pension.


[London, Torquay] Letters and forms and documents covering her income taxes for these years.


London;


London; Copies of royalty checks both recto and verso showing her signature.


Windsor, Ontario; [Under name of Gladys Lewis; with photgraph]


London; [Under name of Glady Lewis, with photograph; stamps until page 11]


Torquay; [Under name of Gladys Lewis]


London; Torquay; TDM[Reciepts from various businesses (secretarial service, doctor, subscription]


[London] Associated Book Publishers royalty statements for Anne Lewis for Lewis' books.


Torquay; Martin Secker & Warburg Royalty Statements for Anne Lewis for Lewis' "Rthe Roaring Queen"


[n.p.] Methuen Royalty Statement for Anne Lewis for Lewis' Books


London; [Subscription Book for Anne Lewis]


London; Completed form A


Montreal; [William was Wyndham's uncle]


New York; [Russell & Volkening appointed literary agent of Wyndham Lewis]


New York; Request to get certified copy of Charles Edward Lewis' death certificate.





[London] Two requests for books for Lewis, one by M. Mauriac, the second by J. de Gaultier.


London; Lloyds Bank Limited cheque for 45 pounds, signed by Lewis.


{London] Cashed cheques and stubs from Martins Bank; after 1951 filled out by Anne Lewis and only signed by Lewis.


[London] Signed G. R. Mitchison.


[n.p.] Seems to involve the case mentioned in folder 8, and labeled with the quoted title.


[London] Deed between Lewis and The Mayor, Aldermen and Burgesses of the Borough of Southampton.


[n.p.] Lists sources of income from April to December of 1950.


London & Windsor, Ontario; Both income and expenses.


[n.p.] Lock of light brown hair in envelope marked "Percy's hair" in Anne [Stuart] Lewis' hand.


Zurich & Stockholm; Trip by Lewis to see specialists about his sight condition.


[London] Notes on sales, income and expenses in Lewis' hand.


[London] With annotations in Lewis' hand. Discussioon of the sale of his mother's laundry business.


London; List of cheques received in 1948.


Various places; Corresondence regarding Lewis' medical history.


London; Lewis' dental x-ray with dentist's analysis by W. H. Coldwell.


London; Invoices and prescriptions mainly for his eyes as well as medicines.


[Various places] Bills, financial notices and receipts for hotels, medicines paintings and royalties.


London; Sales to Grayson & Grayson of "The Apes of God"


[n.p.]


[n.p.]List of 4 nursing homes with telephone numbers.


London; Charges for libel brought against Lewis for "Filibusters in Barbary" material.


London; With photograph; stamped to page 14.


New York; With photograph; stamped to page 6.


London; With photograph; stamped to page 8. Some travel expenses glued into back of book.


London; Receipt for $500.


[London] Receipts from lawyers, publishers and others.


[New York] Knopf signed away the rights back to Lewis as they did not publish the American edition. Signed by both Knopf and Lewis.


[London]Payment of dividends to go to Kate Lechmere for six months.


[London] With many hand written notes.


[London]


[London] With hand written corrections and additions.


London] Estimates for trip from London to Montreal to New York


Sag Harbor, NY; Typescript has a dated holograph heading by Lewis; witnessed and signed.


St. Louis; Not witnessed.





Campobello; Expiration of fire insurance for $4000.


[London] Statement for works and amounts bought by Marchant along with payments.


[London] Drafts of the agreement for film rights.


[London] Similar to the above in folder 13.


London; Agreement to write book on the condition of art today.


London; Letter from publisher citing possible libelous actions with information in "Rotting Hill"


London; More citations from publisher citing possible libelous actions with information in "Rotting Hill"


London; Methuen published many of Lewis' books: Human Age II, Revenge for Love, Rotting Hill, Self Condemned, Tarr, The Writer and the Absolute about others.


London; Methuen published many of Lewis' books: Human Age II, Revenge for Love, Rotting Hill, Self Condemned, Tarr, The Writer and the Absolute about others.


London; Addressed to Anne Lewis accompanied by a check for the usage.


London; Addressed to Anne Lewis accompanied by a check for the sales.


London; Agreement for publishing the book, signed by Morrow representatives and Lewis.


New York; Sent to Mrs. Lewis for 1975 royalties on Lewis' book.


London; Draft of Memorandum of Agreement.


London; Memorandum of Agreemen to publish "America and Cosmic Man"


Haymarket; Invoices and correspondence regarding payments for safe deposit and baggage rent.


London; Invoice with list of 4 different times of use for a car hire in July, 1950.


London; Note in hand reads "Lecture in French".


London; One invoice listing many work of art by Lewis, sold, with prices; 2 leaves of correspondence regarding other Lewis art.


[n.p.] For purchase of a copy of "The Lion & the Fox"; on small slip of paper.


[Berlin] Agreement to publish Lewis' "Hitler"


Windsor; Landlord wanted to increase Lewis' rent.


London; Royalty for Lewis from July 1, 1947 to date.


London; Invoices for insurance. Also Travellers' Insurance Association baggage insurance certificate, dated Jun.7, 1950.


[n.p.] Lewis' report for Michaelmas term, 1898; with envelope with Lewis' hand written notes "Reports..."


Toronto; $3.00 statement made out to Lewis of the Tudor Hotel.


Toronto; Agreement to publish, signed by Lewis.


London; Agreement to decorate the walls


[London] Agreement to loan as she is unable to purchase; unsigned.


[London] Permission to repoduce 2 listed art works.


London; Receipt for Lewis of purchase of Pound portrait.


London; Agreement for Lewis to rent Studio A in Kensington Gardens Studios.


London; Invoice with receipt attached for 6 pounds, 6 shillings for X-ray.


London; Dun letter regarding Roger Fry, addressed to Lewis.


Leipzig; Contract for German edition of "Tarr"


London; Moving of books, table, sewing machine and 4 bookcases from 251 Vauxhall Bridge Road to Nottinghill Gate address. With insurance form if required.


London; Purchase of the Arthur Press of the Paleface manuscript. Signed by Zwemmer.


[n.p.] "What with my flu & this I have been immobilized,"


[London] "Dear Sir. I find it is quite impossible for me to come to Cambridge at present."


[n.p.] "Please send the satement modifying proof costs..." With list of figures in Lewis' hand on verso.


[n.p.] " ... A Mademoiselle Madeleine Shaeffer, 17. Boul. Pasteur, Paris, writes me..." Concerns possible translation of "Apes of God".


[n.p.] Sir. First, I must apologize for having failed to understand how vast an organization..." Concerns art show review by Lewis.


[n.p.] "Dear Sir. Your letter has been forwarded to me by Chatto & Windus." Concerns possible translation of "Tarr."


London; My dear Aldington. Your Tobago letter hid itself a few hours after I received it


[n.p.] "Dear Sirs. The Office of the Registrar, at Toronto University has referred me to you" Probably written during World War II, concerning Thomas Earp whereabouts.


[London] Dear Brooks. I cannot say that I think you have condusted yourself in an especially "friendly" way....


[London] Dear Miss Dismorr. Forgive me for answering you at the last moment like this.


[London] My dear Jessie. I hope present difficulties will smooth themselves out


[London] Dear Jessie. Many thanks for letter. You must explain more fully


[London] Dear Jessie. Tomorrow (Weds.) 430 will suit me all right.


London; Dear Jessie. I was sorry to hear that you are once more ill.


[London] Dear Jessie. Do not let your hectic fancy weave things into the following plain communication.


[London] Dear Jess. I was very sorry to hear that once more your organism has become septically active.


[London] Dear Jess. I have stupidly mixed up my engagements this week,


[London] Dear Jess. Thank you for invit. Alas just reached me


[London] Deare Jessie. I'm glad the hear you're enjoying the summer weather,


[London] My dear Jessie. Excuse delay in answering your 22nd December letter.


[London] Dear Jessie. Make it Thursday sometime.


[London] Dear Jessie. Really forgive me for putting off our meeting tonight,


[France?] Dear Miss Dismorr. I shall be back in London in a week, and hope to see you then.


[n.p.] Dear Eliot. The other day I received a letter from Augustus John


[London] Dear Eliot. I am just back from Paris, and have found your article.


[n.p.] "... I feel; had you contemplated a lengthy relationship with me as author,..." Concerns "Snooty Baronet"


[London] My dear Stuart Gilbert. Thank you for a most delightful evening:


[n.p.] Dear Grant. Have you heard yet from your friend in the War Office?


[n.p.] ...should of course be delighted for this to be handled by you.


Paris; Dear Hamilton. I have come over here for a couple of days to transact a little piece of business.


[n.p.] Dear Mrs. Harris. I am [?] with confusion in hearing that Hueffer has thought [?] to send you on my letter.


[n.p.] Dear Hart-Davis. I tried a number of times to reach you by telephone - [Verso has TM[note] regarding Harry Slochower}.


[n.p.] Dear Honeyman How is Mrs. H.'s flu? Your colleague


Market Drayton; Dear S[?]-B[?]. I am delighted to hear that my life has been ruined.


[n.p.] Dear Sir, When I last came to your office I had a conversation with your secretary. [Concerning the non-appearance of drawings (in "The Sketch"?) Lewis had given him.]


[n.p.] Indignantly? protest at propsed exhibit as representing my contribution to contemporary art.


[n.p.] Dear John. I send you this at the same time as a letter for yourself.


[n.p.] Dear Kahane. Many thanks for your letter: it is very good of you to have found me a translator for "Snooty Baronet"


[London] Dear Dr. Kenner I have just sent you a night letter, to say how much I like your book


[n.p.] Dear Sir. It was by a chance today that I discovered that two paintings of mine


[n.p.] Cher Maman. Appallingly busy this evening. Tomorrow we have another infernal exam:


[London] Dear Marshall I am very sorry to hear about your leaving Z.


[London] Dear Marshall. Roy C. said will you give me the article if you've got it -


[n.p.] I fear to have misled you to the extent of supposing that there exists here such a thing as an attachment


[n.p.] ... P. S. At the same time as this I am mailing a few photos of pictures, which I give into your keeping.


[n.p.] Dear Moore. I had forgotten that [such a thing as the English Review excited, and have been living the life a young student


[n.p.] Last night I am sorry to say I had to ask Mr. Rogers to stop the people over our head from tramping about


[London] Dear Russ. Your telegram just arrived. I'm sorry I misread your letter.


[n.p.] Dear Mr. Sedgwick. I received with considerable astonishment your letter,


[n.p.] Earlier dates I gave in my letter


[n.p.] Dear Mr. Strabe: thank you for your letter and hope that fefore long the "Revenge for Love" matter will be settled.


[n.p.] Dear Mr. Tomlin. For some time I have been too ashamed to answer your letter.


[London] Dear Mrs. Turner. Many thanks for your letter, which has absolutely cleared Bordenesque horizon.


[London] Dear Sirs, With reference to the above action, you will appreciate that at the time the advances were made I deposited with your clents certain MSS [Concerning law suit with Chatto & Windus]


[n.p.] Dear Dorcher. I am just back from a long business trip and have a great many difficult and troublesome things to attend to.


[n.p.] Dear Alan: here is the preface to Ayrton's book.


[London] Dear Alan. I find it almost impossible to get you on the phone.


[[n.p.] The pictures by me you propose I have just [?] to exhibit at London Group


Ravenstone; dear Grannie/ I send my love to Mother and you and I will be glad when you come home.


County School, Bedford; My dear mother. I hope you are quite well. I am having a very good time indeed.


Castle Hill School; My dear Mother. I arrived here safely, at 8 o'clock on Wednesday evening. [Copy of verso page of letter included]


Rugby School; My dear Mother. Please excuse pencil. I have no ink, except a little at the bottom of my ink well.


Rugby School; My dear Mother. I am awfully sorry I did not write before. My hands have been full.


[n.p.] Chere Maman. I have got 1 [pound]. I really forget if I got other pound on 23rd or no.


[n.p.] Chere Maman. I forgot to post this letter yesterday; I have only got a few minutes to post closing time, so I will outline.


[n.p.] Chere Maman. Having given 25 francs the the concierge, (to whom, also, by the way, I must give a tip to soon)


[n.p.] Chere Maman. I arrived without mishap the other day, & without mal de mer, also, - by divine indulgence.


[Madrid] Chere Maman. I got the cheque all right the other day, and meant to send a card to acknowledge it,


[Paris] My dear Mama! I've received safely your 4 [pounds] with great satisfaction; I've paid my rent,


[Paris] Chere Maman. I received safely and gladly this morning your 2 [pounds]: but as you crossed the postal order I lost 4 [francs] on it


[Paris] Chere Maman. I asked you to send 25 francs or 50 as you liked: you haven't sent them,


[Paris] Chere Maman. I've got here safely enough in my usual state; I got the 2:20 from London,


[London] Chere Maman. I've succeeded in accommodating myself at Hamilton's, 16 Fitzroy Street


[Paris] Chere Maman. Got your letter. I'm just going to [?] Aunte Lori to get the 20 f.


[Dieppe] My frends are in no way engrossing but I am extremely occupied with several considerations.


Dieppe; My miserable friends, having worried me into writing you a etter saying that I would return immediately to London,


[London] Chere Maman. The proprietor is a chapel-going amiable little person, & since Mr. Herbert hes [sic] given me a reference


[Paris] Chere Maman. I got your letter - with money enclosed - this morning, and suppose from that you hadn't yet got my letter.


Paris; Chere Maman. I've just got your letter, and I really don't know what to say.


[Paris] Chere Maman. I'm staying here another week, as I couldn't with the money you sent me get away,


London; Chere Maman. I have resolved, by hook or by crook, to go to Hamburg tomorrow (Wednesday) at 8 o'clock


[Paris] Chere Maman: You mustn't think I'm intoxicated, but I really forget how old I am, - I couldn't remember yesterday,


Haarlem; Chere Maman. Next Wednesday or Thursday my month's up here, and home I come.


[Paris] My dear old lady, I'm very very sorry to hear that you're not better;


[Paris] Chere Maman. I have safely received both the 1.10 [pounds] & 1.0:0: [pounds] I didn't write when I said I would


[Paris] Chere Maman. Of all the infamous things ever brought to my knowledge,


Nordvyk am Zee; Chere Maman. So we installed Villa Cato, with a studio for me, large bedroom & little eating saloon [sic]


[Paris] Chere Maman. Got your letter and 10 f: I hope you will send puctually by monday morning:


Nordvyk am Zee; Chere Maman. Forgive me for not writing during the week,


[Paris] Chere Maman. I got the money the other day, saturday, in good time, for which relief, much thanks:


Nordvyk am Zee; Ma chere petite Mere. I got the money the other day all right. You remember that I owe the Klener 40 francs:


[Munich] Chere Maman. Me voici, and not a particularly happy 'me'. -


[Paris] Chere Maman. Excuse me for writing shoppily, but I only have a few minutes to do it in.


[Munich] Chere Maman. I got your letter and first 20f. today. Don't forget to seal the letters with wax.


[Munich] Chere Maman. I have at last found a stuio: it is 20 marcs a month,


[Munich] Ecoutez: j'ai oblie de te dire, d'envoyer le jacket


Munich; Le Carnival dure jusqu'au


[Munich] Chere Maman. I have several difficult letters to write; as well begin with one as with another.


Paris; Recu ta lettre ce matin -l'ai brulee. Je n'ai trave qu'un appoitment qui


Dieppe; Chere Maman. I got the monies safely and soundly at the poste Restante, and think it will be better if you send there


[Paris] Chere Maman. En voici impoten - Ida, for some mystical reason, has to go to Germany


[Paris] Chere Maman. The end of last week I got 20 f,


[Paris] ... The weather is excessively disgusting here: it is very cold, and damp;


[Paris] Chere Maman. I've been intending to write to you for many a day:


[Paris] Chere Maman. I forget if I announced the arrival of the 20f a day or so ago: -


[Paris] Chere Maman. Mrs. John died about 4 or 5 days ago, and on Saturday I was at her funerel [sic];


[Paris] Chere Maman. I got the 20f this morning, or yesterday morning, rather: & the other 20f a few days ago.


[Paris] Chere Maman. I need you to give as definite an answer as you can


[Paris] Chere Maman. I got the 20 shill: yesterday. I will write at once to the director


[Paris?] Chere Maman. I dodn't think after all that I shall go to Dieppe;


Moved to box 62, folder 37.5


[Paris] ... I think taht the governor of Jamaica will get into trouble, don't you?


Paris; Chere Maman. I've got your official letter here this morning: I hope I shall get another tomorrow at the Restante.


St. Honorine des Perthes; Chere Maman. I can't do a stroke, no, not a stroke! of work here.


Chelsea; Dear Moore. I gaveyou time to get back to your mountain fastness, and then, sure that my target was more or less stationary, [Original Manuscript in the University of London Library.]


London; Dear Moore. I've been putting off writing for some time because I felt I had so much to say [Original Manuscript in the University of London Library.]


[London] Dear Sir. I found your card yesterday, and was sorry not to have seen you.


[n.p.] Dear John. I have received your letter. Whether I am worth consulting with


[n.p.] Dear John. I reply at once to your letter, and want to have done with this chapter in my life


[London] Dear Lady Muriel. I see in the paper today that the [?] & pictures are being shown again


[London] Dear Lady Muriel Paget. It occured to me after I had left you that I should have advised


Brecknoch Studios; Dear Miss Shepler. I am afraid I must have seemed very strange to you


Soho; Dear Miss Shepler. Letter just reached me from Grafton.


[London] ...just struck me that I am speaking with an immodesty almost gascon;


London; Dear Moore. I don't know how telepathetic you are: [Original Manuscript in the University of London Library.]


London; Dear Moore. Those dirty beasts of readers have got the library in each state [Original Manuscript in the University of London Library.]


London; Dear Moore. In the Century Dic: panjandrum [Also rarely Panjanderum a word used by Samuel Foote [Original Manuscript in the University of London Library.]


London; Dear Moore. A convelescent landlady has just sent me a batch of letters [Original Manuscript in the University of London Library.]


London; Dear Moore. I intended writing you some weeks ago, [Original Manuscript in the University of London Library.]


Ealing; Chere Madam. Ce n'est pas banal, me low-dutch Sappho, en effet. [Original Manuscript in the University of London Library.]


[London] Dear Fry. When I wrote to you the other day [on same sheet of paper is draft of Bell letter]


Islington; Dear Fry. Your answer yesterday I confess puzzled me.


[London] Dear Fry. Your answer yesterday implied that my things at the Grafton were not in common [On verso of Valuation Office of the Inland Revenue form announcing an upcoming inspection of Brecknock Studios; torn into two pieces.]


Islington; Dear Miss Shepler. I have been absent from my studio presence days


Islington; Dear Bell. May I place before you, as one considerably interested in the Fitzroy Square business [Concerns "The Ideal Home Exhibition"]


[London] Understanding that you are interested in the Omega Workshops, [In folder 79 is the same letter in facsimile, the original at the University of London Library where it is attributed as being sent to Thomas Sturges Moore]?


[London] Dear Mr. Konody. I have just seen Gore, & he bears out every word, naturally


[London] Dear Bell. You will by this time no doubt have received the round letter


[London] Dear Mrs. Harris. I was sorry you did not come to the Cabaret Club last night,


London; Dear Etchells. I am sending you some Perspectives of "Art School" & "Art Center."


[Festniog, Wales] Je to previns: ca se


London; Dear Pound. Many thanks for your excellent piece on Binyon


[London] Dear Mrs. Hastings, I have never been so commiserated with. If you go on in this way


[n.p.] Dear Acherley. I hope you will like these specimens of Wadsworth work.


[London] Dear Miss Lechmere, I have your letter of this date, contents of which I confirm.


[London] Dear Miss Dismorr. I should be delighted to have tea with you on Tuesday next.


Cafe Royal; Dear Alec. I have been making efforts for last week or two to get


[London] Dear Alec. I am in bed for a few days. As soon as I am up again -


[London] Dear Jessie. I am sorry not to have answered before. I intended sending you a wire.


[London] Dear Alec. I have intended telephoning to you since the beginning of the week,


[London] Dear Pound. Sorry abut Coburn swith. Isn't he going to do it?


[London]Dear Jessie. I was very sorry to hear that you had been ill again. What a nuisance


[London] Dear Miss Lechmere. I have received your writ, and with it your address, which I have been seeking for some weeks.


[London] Dear John. Your letter received this morning. After your cleaver display


[London] My dear Alick. I have been away for a few days, & very glad on my return to get your card


[London] Dear Alec. I have an interview with John Lane tomorrow at 12.30.


[London] Dearest Aleck. I cannot describe my resentment with a woman who made me drunk last Saturday afternoon,


[London] Dear Jessie. Can you come in Saturday instead of tomorrow,


London; Dear Pound. I have seen Miss Weaver. She appears to think that the book is too long to serialize,


Lydd; Chere Maman. All appears to be going well. The Battery hours on Saturday,


Dover; Chere Maman.I expected to be paid a few shillings today, which would have carried me


Dover; Chere Maman. I have had my leave cancelled, because I am going with a


Sussex; Chere Maman. I have sent (indeed sent by Barclay) 50 pounds to [Fawselbedduned?]


[London] Dear Miss Turner. In your last letter you seemed to feel that my communication was of an unusual character.


Dorset; Chere Maman.We are still here.= They are forming another siege Battery next week.


[London] Dear Baker. In your letter the other day you referred to a painting "for which you had not yet paid".


[London] Dear Moore, I am trying another publisher = I like him too; I like all the publishers I have had dealings with so far.


Dover; Chere Maman.I have no fuller address for the moment.


Dover; Chere Maman.I have no fuller address for the moment.


Dover; Chere Maman. Thank you for the telegraph order. [With 2 pages list of "Drawings at Pound" as letter includes notation of a will with bequest of these "if anything should happen to me."]


Dorset; Dear Pound. I have got shifted in here, and lost my leave. Heavens knows when I shall get any leave now.


Weymuth; Chere Maman.I got back here safely & in time. I find my absence did not put me back much with lectures


Weumuth; Dear Pound. Excuse delay in answering your letter. = I have made various efforts to get out.


Weymuth; Chere Maman. Letter received this morning. Regars money, I am afraid I havn't got the sum you mention in the Bank.


Horsham; Dear Mama. I hope you are over your bout of cold by this time. Let me know.


Horsham; Chere Maman. We leave here as I told you, I think, on Saturday morning. There is nothing new.


Lydd, Dear Pound. Many thanks for cheque. Am sending with this an isoleted ackowledgement.


Lydd; Dear Pound. Thank you for cheque of Quinns, for 25 pounds, received today,


Weymuth; Chere Maman. We are leaving here on Wednesday next for Horsham.


Lydd; Dear Pound. My stay at Horsham was short. I had a day in town & visited you.


Lydd; Dear Mrs. Hueffer. I left the dispatching of my telegram till the end of the day,


France; Chere Maman. This is my new address, for a week or two.


[France] Dear Miss S. Please give my new address to Mr. Pierce. 330 Siege Battery. R. G. A.


Lydd; Dear Mr. Quinn, I am sorry that I had to trouble you the other day via Ezra Pound.[2 copies of same typed letter, one labelled Lewis's copy]


Cosham; My dear Moore, I have intended on several occasions lately to pay you a visit [Original manuscript at the University of London Library.]


[France] Chere Maman. I am now in the firing line with a new Battery. We were sent up without guns,


[France] Chere Maman. Many thanks for book: (received yesterday). Such trouble about getting anymore.


Michelham; My dear Alick. Many thanks for your aimiable and [?] letter.


[France] My dear Pound. I am back now with my old Battery. I have come to a tedious spot.


[France] Dear Pound. Thank you for letter received today.= First of all, Hartley is unlikely to find me


[France] Dear Pound. We have been suddenly plucked up from our position in the North, and have since then journeyed many a mile.


France; Dear Miss S. A brief note. = You sent me most of the 2nd letter, but you lost one of the pages.


France; My dear Alec. Thank you for your last letter. I shall shortly be expecting another one.


France; Dear Pound. I again dined the other night with Orpen. R. A. (Major) the other night


[London] Dear Alec. I will send you a P.C. Your chelsea address


[London]; My dear Alec. Forgive me omissions, and slovenly [?] in a correspondent.


France; My dear Pound. Enough as you say, of coxcombs. But where you say that many of those paintings


[London] Dear Moore, I return you the MSS. of your story, which I liked immensely. [Original manuscript at the University of London Library.]


London; Dear Moore, Thank you for your lettere: I am glad to hear that my book wears well with you: [Original manuscript at the University of London Library.]


[London] All intelligent is attacked by flu. I am at the Endslright Palace hospital. [Written on back of envelope]


London; My dear Quinn, I expect you will have got my letteres and the photographs of pictures by this time.


[London?] Dear A[?]. If you are free tomorrow afternoon (about 4.30) would you care to come up here & see us?


[Suffolk] Have sent 2 [nighties?] take out the [?] absurdities [Written on form for telegraphs]


[London] Dear Jessie. [?] is the [?] to you, can you come Saturday instead of Friday?


London; Dear Jessie. I am sorry the day before yesterday's visit was so scattered & uncomfortable.


London; Dear Jessie. I am sorry to have missed you on Saturday. Monday I shall not be here at tea time.


[London] Dear Jessie. Rodker is coming to see me tomorrow evening, & afterward he suggested visit to Bloomsbury.


London; Dear Jessie. I am sending [??] to receive you at 4.30 tomorrow in a friendly way.


[London] My dear Nash. My delay in answering your first letter was owing principally, if not entirely,


London; My dear Quinn, You must excuse me for the long delay in answering your letter.


London; My dear Nash, I have just got your last valuable letter. I am so glad, you are working hard!


London; Dear Rothenstein. I have delayed answeringyour letter until I should be able to lay my hands on a copy of the Ideal Giant,


London; Dear Rothenstein. Thank you for your letter; and I was glad that my tract pleased you.


[n.p.] Dear Jessie. Would you consider unfriendly if I substituted some of this day for tomorrow?


[London] Dear Bob. I was very glad to receive your letter, and especially as it showed that our friendship had not been impaired


London; Dear Rothenstein. Herewith is a ticket for the small show of drawings that I told you I was having.


London; Dear Rothenstein. I have not replied earlier to your letter, because I wanted to see two or three of the painters


London; Dear Rothenstein. I am sorry to say that I shall not be able to come to the meeting


London; Dear Jessie. I am very busy. I could not communicate with you today, or would have done so.


London; Dear Rothenstein. I will come round some evening after dinner: probably Saturday next,


London; Please prepare chap eight.


London; Dear Quinn, The reason that I have delayed this letter so long has been because, principally,


Moved to Box 63, folder .05


London; My dear Eye/ rish. I am going to try & get down tomorrow (latish, I expect.)


Nantes,France; Poste Restante Vannes Bretagne pour cinq


Vannes,France; Dear I[?]. Am here till Sunday next. After that my address c/o Cooks'.


Saumur, France; Darling I. I have not written you before, because up to the present I have been engaged in an incessant Trek.


Paris; Back tomorrow don't worry will arrange immediately much love


Paris; Dear IB I have been here for a day or so now: waiting for money from Bank.


London; Dear IB. I intended coming dinner this evening. But as I had to see Adams & Bob,


London; Dear IB. I am going to try & get down tomorrow somewhere about one or two.


London; My dear Jessie. Excuse my delay in answering your letter. The fact is I have had a little trouble with my eye,


London; Dear Nancy. I am very sorry to have to write you a letter that may cause you annoyance or disappointment.


[n.p.] Enclosed 10/- (ten shillings). If you write (in acknowledge receipt you may) plain seal envelope.


[London] Dear IB. I enclose [Beau} cheque for $3.10.0, all I can spare.


London; ... Lawrence has brought out another dirty book, procurable at enormous expense, [Typed facsimile of original in the British Museum made by Professor Antony Alpers]


London; My dear Jessie. Excuse delay in replying. The last month for me has been an orgy of business worry.


[London] Dear Alec. I came to see you during week end (Easter): & found you away.


[London] Dear Rothenstein. I am sitting for myself at present - in fact it is a permanent job:


London; Dear Jessie. Here is Eliots address: 9. Clarence Gate Gardens. N.W.1.


[ London] Dear Jessie. Today (SAT) I am going away for probably 4 or 5 days.


Paris; Dear IB. I am returning tomorrow. But in case I should be delayed, I send you this cheque (for THREE POUNDS)


[ London] Dear IB. I will meet you any time you like to appoint after dinner next week


London; Dear IB. I will provisionally keep Wednesday evening (7=9) clear.


[n.p.] Dear IB. Your letter has been forwarded to me. I do not propose to write letters to you:


[n.p.] Dear IB. Enclosed 2 [pounds]. all I can manage at the moment. In a few days I shall have a temporary address,


[London] Dear IB. This morning (8.30) I again paid call, but found you out


Brussels; Dear Iris. Your letter was forwarded to me at the above address.


Brussels; Dear Barry. Two more letters received today. - Listen: honestly, I have no money at this moment:


[London?] Dear IB. I will send you 1.[pound] tomorrow. I will try & send you 2 [pounds] next week.


[ London] Dear IB. If you still work in Bond St. it is clear that a visit to the Plane Tree for lunch was deliberate, [With typed transcription]


[ London] Dear IB. Here is 1. [pound] (one pound.) I will send you another 1.[pound] before Saturday


[London] Dear IB. I had no money last week to spare till Saturday, though I had expected it earlier.


London; Dear IB. I have not been very well. (cold etc) : Also I have been phenomenally hard up.


London; Sorry. Tomorrow morning thing [?] & communicating with you.


London; If free meet 9:15 Notting Hill Tube.


[London?] Dear IB. I am sorry about cheque & subsequent delay. [On "The Tyro" letterhead.]


London; Dear Joyce, Pound tells me that it is your kind intention to have me sent a copy of Ulysses. [Microfilm copy, from which this was transcribed, in Lockwood Memorial Library in Buffalo, N.Y.]


London; Dear Rothenstein. I am sorry not to have answered your letter before. I have beenin Paris over the weekend,


[London] Dear Rothenstein. Here is the drawing you said you would like to have and asked me not to sell.


[London] Dear Rothenstein. I [?] cheque am back by [?]


London; Dear Rowland. I tried to get through to you the other day, but failed. I supposed you wished to speak to me


London; Dear Violet, K. M.'s note arrived. I don't see how, short of possessing such powers of divination [Transcribed from typescript copy of original at the British Museum by Professor Antony Alpers.]


London; Dear Schiff, I was very sorry to hear from Violet that you and she had also been attacked. [Typed copy of original holograph copy at the British Museum by Professor Antony Alpers.]


London; [Envelope only with no letter.]


London; Dear Sir/ I have been waiting, before writing you, to see my soliciter, but so far have not been able to. [**Folder number 34 never "was", number was skipped due to mistake when numbering.]


London; Dear Alec. Can you dine FRIDAY next, meeting me here at 7.30?


London; Dear Jessie. Miss S. is taking this for sure: just a note to wish you a happy New YEAR,


London; Dear Eliot. As since the arrival of your letter I have not had time to answer it fully,


London; Dear Eliot. Thank you for the letter. I am glad to hear that you are not going to write too regularly [On verso is start of another letter to Eliot.]


London; Dear Jessie. On Friday I have sitter till 4.30 & another one at 8.


London; Dear Joyce, Mrs. S. gave me your message, and I shall be delighted to see you Friday next at five.


London; Dear Sitwell. I enjoyed Facade, & think it was an improvement on the first performance.


London; Dear Eliot. Your promised me: (1) To pay me a cheque as soon as I handed you the Mss.


[London] Dear Dick. (1) If you are worried, I have had far more cause for worry than you.


[London] Dear Fanny. In the restaurant last might I met Dick, who when I referred to the matter of the monthly cheque


[London] Dear Fanny. Without wasting time in disputes [???] known the circumstances appeared to you


[London] Dear Fanny. There is no good indulging in humbug: and no letter I could write you under the circumstances


[London] My dear Dick. First your Letter: Your "open diplomacy" (though if open it ceases thank god to be "diplomacy" - which is a game for fools


[London] Dear Dick. With regard to the mild and reasonable nature of my reply to you yesterday, it has occurred to me


London; [Facing of envelope only, the rest torn off.]


[London] Dear Jessie. Miss S. tells me that your sister is better now - I am glad to hear.


[London] Dear Jessie. Your letter to hand - I will telephone tomorrow afternoon; [On blank envelope.]


London; Dear Eliot. As you suggested next week for this exceptional advance payment,


[n.p.] Dear Schiff : I realize that a game is being played, of course : but if you don't mind I will not join in.


[London] Dear Eliot. As regards The Perfect Action: first of all the length: we computed you may remember that it came to seventeen thousand.


London; Dear Miss Fassett. Perhaps you have misunderstood Mr. Eliot; [Regarding "Criterion" publishing Lewis works.]


London; Dear Mrs. Shakespear. I have just been down to Bedfords to identify drawing and sign it,


London; Dear Miss Fassett. Thank you for your letter. - Have you the necessary information


London; Dear Mrs. Shakespear.Thank you very much for the cheque (received via Bedford) for 25[pounds]


London; Dear Mr. Waugh. Here is the complete Mss. of the book "The Man of the World":


[London] Dear Eliot. Please take this letter as a food proof of my desire to stop you.


[London] Dear Mr. Whibley. Eliot told me some time ago that he had shown you a Mss of mine,


London; Dear Mrs. Shakespear. I have a scheme which may or may not appeal to you.


London; Dear Mrs. Shakespear. (Excuse this paper - no better paper in house.) Thank you


London;


[London] Dear E.P. I do not want a "Lewis number" or anything of that sort [With 1 photograph of first page of letter. One page used Pound's earlier letter to Lewis.]


[London] Dear Miss Dismorr. Would you like to add to your collection of drawings by you know who, who is poor.


[London] Dear Jessie I was sorry to hear of your loss. Can I be of any assistance to you?


London; Dear Eliot. What does this signify - two guineas in payment for reviews [3 different notes on one leaf, including Sept.15 & 30 & Oct.3]


London; Dear Eliot. On referring to your figures again, I find that 3.17.).[pounds] is given as money owed by me and not to me.


[n.p.] My dear Jessie. Let me assure you from the depth of my heart that I would much rather not go


London; Dear Mrs. Shakespear. You will have been wondering why the drawings have not arrived.


[n.p.] Dear Jessie. As you seem to experience some difficulty in understanding what I mean,


London; Dear Moore. Almost immediately after receiving your letter I went to France


[London] Dear Eliot. When we met today I was extremely tired, having worked till very late


[London] Dear Eliot. I expect I shall hear from you tomorrow: but I am writing in case I should not,


[London] Dear Eliot. I expect I shall hear from you tomorrow: but I am writing in case I should not, [On same leaf is another TL[copy] to Eliot of March 23, 1926.]


London; Dear Eliot. What does this signify - two guineas in payment for reviews [3 different notes on one leaf, including Sept.15 & 30 & Oct.3]


London; My dear Eliot. No doubt your secretary will have given you my message, [4 different notes on one leaf, including March 7, 8, 16, and 21]


London; Dear Moore A book of mine, just published (The Art of Being Ruled) was sent off yesterday to your address


London; Dear Eliot I held the enclosed letter up a day to see if the fresh week would bring forth an answer from you.


London; Dear Mr. Saxton. Here are a few notes for publicity purposes, giving a few details of my career up to date. [With Lewis' TM "Biographical Details" which is also in Box 3, Folder 17.]


London; Dear Moore. Thank you for your letter which has just reached me.


London; Dear Eliot I have just received the New Criterion, and was extremely glad to learn that you are recommending my book


London; Dear Eliot. I am glad to hear you will be able to do something for me. [With 4 TL[copy] to Eliot plus 1 [TL[fragment, copy]; Oct.8, Dec.11, 15, 26 and 1 undated fragment.]


[n.p.] Dear Lady Waterhouse. I wish to try and convey to you my thanks for your magnificent and [?] present.


London; My dear Rothenstein. Very many thanks for your letter, with which I was very much pleased and flattered.


London; Dear Moore. I was very glad to hear that your first impression of "Time & Western Man" was favourable.


London; Dear Moore. On Saturday unfortunately I cannot come to dinner because I am broadcasting -


London; Dear Moore. Thank you very much for your kind letter, and I am glad that a first glance


[London] Dear Waterhouse. I have now received the bill from the printer, and it is much heavier than I had expected :


London; Dear Moore. Thank you for your letter, and I am indeed glad to hear that some mental qualification went with


London; Dear Moore. Thank you for your letter, and excuse the fact that this answer is so long overdue.


London; Dear Rothenstein. Thank you for your card and I will ring you up in the following week instead.


London; Dear Sir, In Mr. Arnold Bennett's very interesting notice last week of a publication of mine, he adopted an attitude


London; My dear Moore. I am sending you at the same time as this one of the advanced copyies given me of "Time & Western Man."


London; My dear Moore. Thank you very much for your letter. Its terms were


[London] Dear Alick. Two minds with but one thought! As your letter arrived I was writing you.


London; My dear Rothenstein. Very many thanks for your kind letter, which I have just received on my return from Paris.


London; My dear Rothenstein. Very many thanks for your kind letter, to which I am only now replying,


[n.p.] Dear Sir I must apologize for the long delay in answering you but the facts re. "The Arthur Press" are as follows. [No address on envelope but "NOT SENT" written.]


[London] Dear Mr. Garnett. The edition of the New York Herald-Tribune Magazine Section wants "a gossipy article of 2.000 words"


[London] Dear Prentice, I have reread your letter of June 21st though I have still had no chance of looking agin at the agreement. [Not in Lewis' hand, may be A.J.A. Symons']


[n.p.] Dear Sir. Two days ago I sent you a telegram to which I have received no reply.


[n.p.] My dear Mr. Wyndham. If [?] told you that I was asked by the London group to contribute to their [Belo?] Exhibition


[n.p.] Dear Wyndham. In the event of your wishing to dispose of my pictures I imagine you would put them up for sale


[n.p.] Dear Mr. Brooks It was rather late when I left you yesterday and I had not time to write as arranged.


[n.p.] Dear Prentice. I was too depressed last night to write you as the sort of thing I have to write [Re "Childermass" and Chatto & Windus]


[n.p.] Dear Prentice. Thank you very much for your letter and it at least is something that you are so patient with my clumsy


[London] Dear Moore. I arrived yesterday on the "France" from New York -


[London?] Dear Prentice. Thank you foryour letter and for what you have effected re the advances.


[London] Dear Mr. Wells. I am a [?] late with a book (which is supposed to appear this autumn)


[London] Dear Yeats. Yesterday I showed my publisher her (Chatto) your letter and he thought it would be


Munich; Dear Yeats. YOur letter has just reached me; I have been moving about a great deal during August.


Munich; My dear Moore. Your letter has reached me (via France & Spain). What you say about my book


[London] Dear Yeats. Thank you very much for permission to use the letter. The extract would as you say convey something different


London; Dear Mr. Marshall. Many thanks for your note which followed me to Germany and has just come.


London; Dear Mr. Marshall. I am glad you can come and suggest Wednesday (7th Nov) evening next.


London; My dear Moore. I have now got straight here in a sort of studio (at 53. Ossington Street)


London; Dear Jessie.Did I say to write to 33? This house, 53, if same street, is not quite in order yet


London; Dear Jessie. Very many thanks for the cheque for 30[pounds] which arrived in the course of the day -


London; Dear Mr. Marshall. Thank you very much for your letter and you seem to have done much reclame in the last week..


London; I did not get your card in time to telephone I am sorry to say. -Tomorrow Thursday I am going out


London; Dear Moore. I found the "B[?] of the Air" after you had left & have sent it off.


London; Can you come after dinner about nine instead if that inconvenient make it aperitif six thirty.


London; Dear Jessie. What has occurred - you are not ill I hope? I waited for you till 7 this evening.


London; I was sorry to hear of cold, I hope you are better. Unless I hear to conte. I shall expect you next Thursday about 5.


[n.p.] My dear Aldington. I am glad you thought the article would be useful. If I can do anything else; please let me know.


[London] I had done up packet of 12 (herewith) & was under the impression I had left them with housekeeper:


[London] Dear Prentice. Many thanks for your letter. I am glad to hear that the "Preface" is safe.


[London] Dear Moffat Your letter slightly distressed me. You said you know that you would tell me before [Slightly different versions.]


London; Dear Jessie. I hope the printing will be ready by Saturday but I don't want to hand it over till quite finished.


London; Dear Jessie. After all the picture will not be ready tomorrow I am sorry to say.


[London] Dear Dorcher. I am very worried about the bank. [?] knows I have just paid fifty to the printer


London; Dear Jessie. On Monday I rose late, having gone to bed in the early hours:


London; Dear Mr. Marshall. Very many thanks for your letter. The reason for the delay with "Enemy no. 3" has been


London; My dear Symons. Some days ago I found a copy of the "Ideal Giant": but it is I am afraid the only one I have


London; I am in bed with flu. Excuse me for not


London; Dear Dismorr Here is the 30 [pounds] in bank notes, receipt of which please acknowledge.


London; Dear Mr. Marshall. Here are the 25 copies of the circular. - I wonder if you have access to a directory of bookshops


London; Dear Mr. Marshall. Excuse the delay in answering your letter - I have been waiting to find if Saturday was clear


London; Dear Mr. Marshall. How about this and that? Can you meet me next week -


London; Dear Mr. Marshall. Let us meet & have a drink after your work


London; Dear Mr. Marshall. Very many thanks for so kindly sending me "Paper Houses": I would


London; Dear Mr. Marshall. Very many thanks for your letter. If you are free will you come to the ["Badiga"]


London; Dear Moffat. This was about the time you spoke of opening your place - I have seen nothing about it


[n.p.] Dear Sir. The manager of [Wm.] Miller & [Gelter?] was so good as to say, one [much?] ago, that he would take


London; Dear Moffat. I have received your letter of a day or two ago. As to the card for your opening,


London; Dear Moore. At present I am in the middle of packing, I am moving my small library from one room to another


[n.p.] Deaer Sirs. Constables have placed me in a very awkward position in the matter of the fresh agreement [Waterhouse was the solicitor of Constable.]


[n.p.] Dear Prentice. Thank you for your letter regarding the "Apes of God".


Paddington; My dear Marshall Herewith the 2 circulars - 1 of "Apes of God", & 1 with cuttings from Paleface.


[London] Dear Marshall Herewith other 50 circulars.


London; Dear Mr. Jackson I have printed too few circulars I fear & [until?] I get some more


[London] Dear Lady Glenapp. I am told that ou have been interested in the news that I am starting a Press,


London; Dear Prentice Very many thanks & I should be delighted to have dinner Thursday next


[London] Dear Lady Glenapp.Thank you very much for your letter. It's very good of you to say that you will see


London; Dear Jessie. I saw that you had subscribed for "Apes". Instead of my coming to Hampstead,


[London] Dear Marshall. I am glad to hear that you are getting a number of inquiries. "Enemy, No. 4" will not be ready


[London] Dear Newman Flower. Thank you for your letter. I shall be at the gallery about 3.30 tomorrow afternoon


London; Dear Mr. Murray. Thank you for your letter - I have recovered the "Architectureal" Review from a person to whom


[London] Dear O.S. Can you give me a cheque for 10 pounds in exchange for this dated the tenth (next week)?


[London] Dear Porteus. Your letter received: but I should like to say something. -


[n.p.] My dear Aldington. First, let me thank you for the excellent publicity you have given the "Apes of God"


[London] Dear Lady Glenapp.I did not telephone on Tuesday as I had said I would


[n.p.] Dear Lady G. I have been expecting to hear from you daily. May I [confess?] to the very (slightest) pique


London; My dear Moore. Since we last met I have been all over the world - I am engaged on a trip


London; Dear Prentice. I enclose the letter you sent me - I do not know Mr. Thomas, and surely the "Daily Mail"


London; Dear Prentice. It was a very great pleasure seeing you last night and hearing what impression the "Apes" had


[n.p.] Dear Lady Glenapp. I am glad to hear that you experience "certain feelings of delicacy" where the feelings of artists


London; Dear Barry. Thank you for your letter. So far the novel you speak of has not turned up.


London; Dear Barry. I have received your further letter. The endearments that you think fit to employ I confess disgust me,


London; Dear Lady Glenapp. Thank you for your letter - yes, I noticed the "Spanish Lady" was missing,


London; Dear Marshall. Many thanks for your note. I hope to see you very soon now. You can tell me then what your friend


London; My dear Moore. When I received your book, to which you referred as a "mi?"?], I was prostrate


[n.p.] Dear Prentice. Thank you very much for your letter. I am glad you think the final draught of "The Diabolical Principle" is good.


[n.p.] Dear Prentice. Thank you for your letter. Regarding "the Apes". If I speak without finishing at all you will I am sure [Marked "Not sent"]


[n.p.] Dear Lady Glenapp. Thank you for your letter. I am glad to hear that you will be in my neighbourhood


[n.p.] Dear Prentice. Is your firm prepared to make an offer for "The Apes" -


London; My dear John. Many thanks for your letter and I am glad that "Satire & Fiction" pleased you.


[London] Dear Leslie. Thank you very much for your letter. What you say about "The Apes of God" gives me very


[London] I am back from Berlin. Any time tomorrow or succeeding days all right for me. [Looks to be for a telegram]


London; Am working upon dress today. Can you sit for head tomorrow morning twelve, daylight essential. [For a telegram]


London; Dear Prentice. Many thanks for your letter. I am glad to hear that the "Preface" is safe. It is an essential part of the book, [Another copy of this is in folder 30.]


[n.p.] Dear Lord Glenapp. The portrait of your wife is now finished, and the result is I think very satisfactory.


London; Dear Lady Glenapp. The portrait is now finished, and, when you see it I think you will agree,


[n.p.]; Dear Lady Glenapp. The portrait is now finished, and, when you see it I think you will agree,


London; Dear Moore. Thank you very much for your letter: I too have had a bad spell of influenza.


[n.p.]; Dear Lady Glenapp. Thank you for your letter. It is a pity you are so busy but I quite understand,


London; My dear Moore. Thank you for your card of last week. Let me know when you are better.


London; Dear Moore. Next Wednesday would suit me very well - shall I expect you about 5?


Berlin; Dear Lady Glenapp. I am sorry I was not there when you wanted the portrait last week


[London] Lord Glenapp. I am back from Berlin any time tomorrow or succeeding days all right for me.


[London] Lord Glenapp. I am back from Berlin any time tomorrow or succeeding days all right for me.


London; Dear Lord G. This note merely to say I shall be away tomorrow (Sunday), but back on Monday.


[n.p.] Dear Lady Cholmondeley. I have just been to a doctor and he has advised me to go to bed -


[n.p.] Thank you very much for your letter. - It is gastric flu'.


[London] Dear Nancy. Here is a rough agreement regarding "The Roaring Queen," outlined in this way


[n.p.] Dear Prentice. At last I am settled for a week or so after having moved incessantly about for some time.


[n.p.] ... and might have more success than I have had. I remember that when I was over there the people you mentioned


London; Dear Prentice. There was a matter I intended to montion today, but forgot: namely the little book


[n.p.] Dear Marshall. This note is only to say that I have 100 word review of the British Lional


[n.p.] Dear Mr. Desmond Flower. Here is the agreement: if that is agreeable to you, I suggest that Clause I


[London] My bank rather disagreeable & getting a new one. Tell Zwemmer to hold that cheque


[London] Dear Sirs. Here is the "Introduction" to the "Doom of Youth" -


Washington, D.C.; My dear Gilman. I have to stop here over week-end for 2 or 3 functions -


Cambridge, MA; Dear Gilman. On Saturday I am being given a farewell dinner here & on Sunday shall be in N.Y.


[n.p.] Dear Sirs. I have your 'statement of claim' regarding the action of Chatto & Windus. I should be glad at once


[n.p.] Dear Barnes. I send this to you, not to Bath, because of course it is with you & have always


[n.p.] Dear Barnes. The fantastic interpretations put upon my references to him in the "Doom of Youth",


[London] Dear Mr. Barnes. Thank you for your letter received this minute. - of course I will supply Messrs Chatto


[n.p.] In reply to a letter from Mr. Prentice threatening to circularize any publications in London,


[n.p.] Dear Neuman Flower. I have what is from my standpoint an extremely serious matter to open up with you


[London] My dear Henderson. After p. 11 there is no display type, or anything complicated or requiring


[n.p.] Dear Prentice.You say you do not wish to "squabble", but you introduce into your letter statements


[n.p.] Dear Prentice. Your letter of the 6th inst. is only in keeping with your treacherous attitude


[n.p.] Dear Prentice. I may be very stupid but I do not quite understand yet what you want.


[n.p.] Dear Prentice. I am writing you this letter lest at some future time, you should say you did not know


[n.p.] Dear Prentice. When you wrote to me on June 2, I was puzzled at first for I knew that nothing


[London] Dear Desmond Flower. Very many thanks for your letter. I shall appear with complete mss. within a few days.


London; Dear Gilman. I don't even know what the date is! - since seeing you I have been shut up in a spell of work


[n.p.] Dear Ezra. Your letter to hand. Very well. But give me some details. What books will you discuss?


[London] Dear Desmond Flower. I have miscalculated again, and still have a few pages to do.


[n.p.] Dear Sirs. Here is the corrected proof of the "Doom of Youth". It has been delayed because


[n.p.] Dear Prentice. I am sending back the proofs of the "Doom of Youth" herewith. I am sorry they have


[London] My dear Gilman. I am writing this in very great haste to get the "Majestic" mail, so that you should get my letter


[n.p.] Dear Desmond Flower. Upon returning home tonight I have received rather bad news & it is more than ever


London; My dear Campbell. I enjoyed my visit to Martiques very much. But it was too much overshadowed by SNOOTY.


London; Dear Prentice. I am just back from France and have your two notes. In your absence your firm wrote me,


[London] Dear Mr. Flower. Here are (1) the alterations in text of "Snooty Baronet" & (2) a rough blurb or material for a blurb,


[London] Dear Gilman. Thank you for cable & I was delighted to hear you liked "Snooty". (Thank you also for


[n.p.] My dear H. Thank you for your letter. It is regards the major issue - an important one to me,


[London] Dear Henderson. Here is the letter I said I would write and you answer - I will pen the answer


[London] Dear Henderson. I have received today proofs of "The En. of the Stars" up to p. 17 (as numbered by printer)


[London] My dear old Hen!* All I want you to do is to have typed out what you wrote me re. proof-corrections


London; My dear Henderson. I telephoned printers this morning (Harrow Road) and they told me that you had stopped


[London] My dear Henderson. After p. 11 there is no display type or any departure from (1) the


[London] My dear Mrs. H. I have now completed the En. of the Stars, & am sending the remainder


[London] My dear Harmsworth. Thank you for your letter - but there seems to be about the question of proofs


[London] Dear Desmond Flower. Your message just arrived - that did not matter at all,


London; Dear Prentice. You say you do not wish to "squabble", but you introduce into your lette [Draft in folder 17]


[London] My dear Gilman. I sent you a cable some days ago & today (Saturday) received one from you,


[London] My dear Desmond Flower. Thank you for your letter. Could you & your wife come & drink a cocktail


[London] Dear Prentice. Thank you for your letter & the enclosure. I feel that under the circumstances it would be


London; I am in receipt of your letter, sent on to me by Chatto and Windus. My answer to your demand for an apology


London; Dear Prentice. When you wrote me on June 21st I was puzzled at first, for I knew that nothing [Another copy in folder 21]


[London] Dear Prentice. When you wrote to me on June 2nd I was puzzled at first for I know [Lengthened version of folder 48 and 21. With signed handwritten note (to secretary?)]


[London] Dear Prentice. In your first letter (June 21) you said "The easiest way out of the


[London] I was glad to hear from my lawyer that your firm


[London] This morning you forwarded me a letter from Martiman which stated


London; Dear Prentice. On Saturday afternoon - that is to say after my soliciter's office


[London] Dear Mr. Barnes. I saw J. B. Priestley today and he told me that his agent,


London; Dear Mr. Barnes. On Saturday afternoon I was informed by J. B. Priestley that his agent [Variant of folder 54]


London; Dear Mr. Barnes. I was mildly astonished to hear that no affidavit had so far


London; Dear Mr. Barnes. The enclosed may be useful to you - not of course to pass on


London; My dear Gilman. Thank you very much for your last letter and your continued interest


[n.p.] Dear Neuman Flower. I was sorry to hear that you had a feverish cold,


[London] My dear Gilman. Thank you very much for your letter and for the cuttings


London; My dear Moore. Thank you for your letter & I was very glad to hear that "Snooty"


London; My dear Rothenstein. Very many thanks for your letter and I am indeed glad


[n.p.] Dear Barnes. Thank you for your letter in reply to mine and excuse me


[London] Dear Sirs. In the [course of?] correspondence will your client, Mr. Prentice, of Chatto [On verso of Walker, Martineau & Co. letter to Lewis, Nov.28, 1932.]


[London] Dear D. F. I have got here all right but have forgotten the MSS! so I have to go back


London; Dear Gilman. I am sorry to say that for 2 months off & on I have ill -


London; Dear Mr. Graham Smith. Very many thanks for your 2 letters - I had not yet answered No.1. because


London; Dear Mr. Graham Smith. Very many thanks for your 2 letters - I had not yet answered No.1. because [Handwritten version of folder 67.]


London; My dear Schiff. Thank you very much indeed for the cheque for twenty-five pounds - it is at this moment


[n.p.] Sir,--Having been given the opportunity of reading Mr. Sean O'Casey's stor, "I Wanna Woman," I can only


London; My dear Mr. Graham Smith. Very many thanks for your notes, and excuse my delay in replying. I have not been


[London] Dear Desmond Flower. If arranging anything with John Rothenstein & wife, do not omit to make your wife


[n.p.] My dear Docker. How are you? August nearly over, & from a back room in Bayswater I have watched


[n.p.] Dear Grigson. I send you a copy of a letter I am sending (in reply to one of his) to Mr. Gillian Roberts -


London; My dear Grigson. I have been ill - Naomi Mitchison told you I expect - & so been moving about a good deal


[London] Dear Grigson. Wednesday of next week (1.30 "Horse Shoe") will be fine.


[London] Dear Gilman. Many thanks foryour letter & the two copies of "American Review". - I got well again a long time ago


London; My dear Grigson. I have just read your review in today's Morning Post - the first to appear as far as I know


London; Dear Grigson. Many thanks for the ["Serutimes?]. I shall study them attentively and embody the result


London; Dear Moore. I was sorry that we could do no more than exchange few whispered words the other day


[London] Dear Mr. Clapham. As I have heard nothing I assume you have not so far succeeded in letting the room.


[London] Dear Mr. Evans. I am once more laid on my back by a chill which has taken the form of a mild cystitus.


[London] Dear Desmond Flower. I have been intending to come round for some days past.


[London] Dear Grigson. Thank you very much - I will be delighted to come to dinner on Wednesday next 7.30.


[London] Dear Grigson. I should like to have a little chat tomorrow (Saturday). Would it be possible for you to come here


[n.p.] My dear Grayson. I have to go away (only for a day or so) tomorrow, and so cannot come to the conference.


London; My dear Gilbert. Did I give you my address? At all events, here it is, and I hope if you ever come to London


London; Dear Grigson. I have been in foreign parts over the New Year. This just to get in touch again


London; Dear Grigson.A hitch occurred in my moving-in - a question of heating, its rather a damp place.


London; My dear Stuart Gilbert - Very many thanks for speaking to Wegener about "Snooty Baronet" -


London; My dear Moore. Thank you very much for your last letter - I have been away in foreign parts over the New Year,


London; Dear Grigson. I have only just got your note - I shall be at my studio from 9.15 onwards on Wednesday next.


London; Dear Grigson.Will 9.30 suit you? My secret address is 21. Chilworth Street. Please avoid mentioning it to anyone


[n.p.] Dear Grayson. I have heard nothing from you or your firm - until today - since the occasion when, at your urgent request,


London; My dear Grigson. Here is the proof of the poem you gave me - thank you very much for letting me see it.


London; Dear Docker. Here I am once more in the nursing home - it is an emergency, as on Sunday I began having


[London] My dear Flower. Symons I daresay has told you : I fell ill 2 1/2 weeks ago, was taken off at midnight to a nursing home,


London; My dear Grigson. Thank you very much indeed for your exceedingly kind letter, which gave the greatest pleasure.


London; My dear Grigson. Your letter has cheered up my invalid state a great deal - it was awfully good of you to write it


London; Dear Gilbert. For over six weeks I have been in this nursing home. I have had an operation - now am convalescent


[London] Dear Desmond Flower. I must apologize very much for not having sent you proofs. The fact is, the post-operational


London; My dear Grigson. At last I am able to announce my departure from this house of detention - I leave this week-end.


[London] My dear Aldington. I feel I ought not to impose in your extreme generosity : and yet, the cheque for fifteen pounds


[London] Dear Stuart Gilbert. Thank you very much for handing "Snooty Baronet" to Wagener - I hope he will like it,


[London] Dear Grigson. Two minds with but one inpulse! - an authentic case of telepathy. For, a few minutes after telephoning


[London] My dear Flower. The proofs will be all in your hands this week. I will explain the delay to you later.


London; Dear Docker. It was very good indeed of you send me the ten-pound cheque. As to what you say, obviously I


London; Dear Campbell. I bought your book the other day - I have been reading it and to be in touch with you again,


London; Dear Grigson. Is this too late? I will ring you up in a day or two as I should like to see you if you are here.


[London] Dear Desmond Flower. I'm sorry thee title can't be changed to "Literary Barrons" too, but if things have gone


[London] Dear Desmond Flower. (1) I enclose a set of "bookplates", fifteen pieces in all, of which eight are original [Plus list of original drawings; plus list of other designs.]


London; Dear Grigson. Excuse me for not writing earlier - I have been moving out of one house into another


London; Dear Grigson. I have four or five things at Swemmer's I should like you to see (one would photograph better,


London; Dear Grigson. What arrangement did we make? I have been beside myself for the last few days. Can you meet me


[London] Dear Flower. Very many thanks for your letter & for the drawings. - I should be uncommonly obliged


London; Dear Grigson. Would it be convenient to hand me back the drawings tomorrow - meeting perhaps at [Greme?] Street


[London] Dear Desmond Flower. A reminder - Please try and get hold of Hubsch before he dances away again.


London; Dear Grigson. Have you any particular evenings that are of over these others : could you come round some


London; My dear Russ. I cannot do anything more in this letter except say how enormously I appreciated your great kindness


Dear Mr. Roberts. Thank you for your letter. It is an unaccustomed honor for me to be included in "an anthology"


London; My deaar Docker. Thank you for your letter. I will, if I do not encroach too much upon your time, make a few remarks


London; My dear Jessie.Thank you for your letter. I should be delighted to meet your young friend, Roger [Rosykter?]


[London] My dear Jessie. Come, if you can, at 4.30 instead of 5 tomorrow. If it is impossible to get hold of R. R.


[London] Dear Flower. As regards Zwemmer's poster : I feel that the act of good will on the part of a bookseller


London; Dear Grigson. Thank you for your splendid review of "Men Without Art". - Did you see old Edith on Sunday


London; Dear Flower.Thank you for the cards. Here is a short list to send to. I was extremely glad to hear that the books


London; Dear Flower.I had not time to answer your note last night re the novel. The fact is that my position is one of


Sir. The reiterated statement, in a book-review (namely that of Oct 19th, by Mr. Stephen Spender) that the literary criticism


London; Dear Flower. I learn that a complete portrait gallery of "authors, past and present," is to form part of the Sunday Times


London; My dear Rotherstein. I ws delighted to hear from the young man in charge of the arrangements that you were


London; Dear Grigson. Can you come to a very small cocktail meeting here, on Wednesday of next week [Invitation to meeting included.]


London; Dear Graham Smith. Your letter re. the debts that have accumulated during my two year illness has reached me.


London; Dear Miss Saunders. Thank you for your letter - to which I have just cabled a reply.


London; Want Sitwell book for few hours shall be in all day till six chilworth or could meet halfway


London; My dear Grigson. It was very annoying that the "Post" would not let you reveiw the Sitwell book.


London; Dear Hastings. I have not so far heard from my fellow-guest of the delightful lunch we had


London; My dear Grigson. Did you see a review in the "Times Litt. Sup." about Murry & myself?


[London] Dear Flower. I enclose a carbon copy of my last letter, lest it should have gone astray,


[London] My dear Grigson. What day did we say for a cup of tea? I have forgotten but think it was next week.


[London] Sir. People who live in glass-houses invariably throw stones, that is a law of nature:


London; My dear Grigson. Congratulations on the "New Verse" handling of the Sitwell girl!


London; My dear Docker. It is many a long day since we met. I missed you by a 1/4 hour


[n.p.] Dear Russ. Health is returning; and today I gave the signal for action to my agent, [Bronk's?].


London; Dear Desmond Flower. To return to the subject of the novel. As you know, somewhere


[London] My dear Stuart Gilbert. If I do not write this mere not, I feel I shall never get a letter written to you at all,


[London] My dear Stuart Gilbert. I wish I could manage to get over this weekend but it is impossible.


London; Dear Docker. As you foresaw, Mauve cannot bear the thought of being painted.


London; My dear Aldington. A brief not only today, to say I have received your letter and am delighted


[n.p.] My dear Russ. Thank you very much for your letter and for the extremely generous suggestions


[London] My dear Flower. Thank you for your letter and cheque. I had not forgotten the 50 [pounds]


London; My dear Flower. I saw Symons yesterday. This morning I hear from him to this effect -


London; My dear D. F. What a bloody thing it is that I have to be sitting down and writing you all this.


London; My dear Grigson. Since last seeing you I have been in great retirement, very hard at work.


[London] My dear A. J. My little book (which is called "False [Bitterness?] is almost finished. [On verso is the Draft of letter sent Nov.17, 1935 in folder 67.]


London; Dear Grigson. Could you manage to come here tomorrow (Friday)? I have had a touch of 'flu'


London; Dear Flower. Thank you for your letter. "Frankly you don't know" what is happening to my book :


London; My dear Grigson. If a certain Jones writes you, making you a certain proposition,


[London] Dear Flower. It was with considerable surprise that I received this morning a letter from A. J. A. Symons,


London; Dear Flower. As I said in my letter to you of May 6, I must ask you to attend to my letters


London; Dear A. J. It is of course extremely kind of you to come forward and offer to negotiate for Cassells


London; My dear Flower. For the last week or so I have been moving about, or I would have communicated with you


London; My dear Grigson. I should very much like to see you. But I am going away (for a few days only I think)


[n.p.] Dear Eliot. Please hang on to that cheque till I get out of this place and have time to turn around :


[London] Dear Docker. I am out! And I must write dispatch to thank you for the cheque


[London] Dear Grigson. I am glad to hear that that has passed off without disagreeable incidents.


[London] My dear Stuart Gilbert. I must apologize very much for so long delaying my answer to your letter.


London; Dear Mr. Flower. The week during which your letter arrived I was undergoing an operation.


London; Dear Sirs. You have I hope duly received my various communications - I shall have to ask you,


London; Dear Mr. Flower. I have been moving about and it took some days for your letter to reach me :


London; Dear Brown. A blood vessel will burst in my big toe it economic tension does not terminate.


[London] Dear Flower.Now that at last Cassells are you tell me, proceding with the publication of my book,


[London] Dear Wren Howard. Do I understand you to say that you accuse me of doing something I have not done,


[London] Dear Wren Howard. Your letter (of Nov. ---) has just arrived. I am if anything more astonished and puzzled


[London] Dear Wren Howard. If your first letter astonished me, you second letter astonished me even more.


London; Dear Sir. Very well: if you say to us "Either I will write to your guarantor and call in the guarantee,


[London] Dear Moore. My address is 29.A. Kensington Gardents Studies. Notting Hill Gate (High Street). W.11.


London; My dear Stuart Gilbert. First I will wish yourself & your wife a not too bloody New Year:


London; Dear Brown. Something should be done about this deadlock. Where there's a will there's a way.


[London] Dear Rothenstein. Of course I should be delighted to sit. But first of all I have to get my own pencil


London; Dear Rothenstein. Thank you for your letter. I should have explained a bit, I see. You are mistaken about B. & Phillips.


London; Dear Sir. In the course of this week I shall be attending to the matter about which you wrote


London; Dear Lovat Dickson. I write with reference to the copy of Mr. Rubinsteins letter of March 19th,


Number skipped in sequence.


[London] Dear Wren Howard. You will have understood that if I have not dealt with your letter sooner,


[n.p.] Dear Brooks. You have asked me to leave the Morrow business to you,


[London] Dear Brooks. My letter was of course a business letter to Heath & Co., [Written on verso of I. W. Ramsay to Lewis, Oct.6, 1937 regarding invitation for lecture to Imperial College Literary and Debating Society.]


[London] Dear Sir, I have to thank you for a fairly offensive letter dated Nov.4. Here is something you


[London] Dear Jerrold. It is most [?] that you do not intend to advertise my book


London; Dear Jerrold. I am sorry you should have seen no way but to depart from the path of strict veracity.


[London] Dear Jerrold. I am now free to attend to other matters than my Show.


[London] Dear Jerrold. What is this new tomfoolery? In reply to my telegraphed request for the figures of sales


[London] Dear Desmond F. We are now, as you will see, neighbors almost. Will you drop up on your way hom some day?


London; Dear Moore. In the midst of the [?] I lost you the other day


London; Dear Rothenstein. I am sorry we had no opportunity of talking properly,


London; Dear Rothenstein. Thank you for your letter. When I was in the Gallery today I was told


[London] Dear Rothenstein. The show has been open a week today: the situation up to date is that our


London; Dear Wyndham. I should like to see the photographs and could meet you same place on Tursday (1.15?) [Written on verso of AL[draft] to Edward Wadsworth, Dec.11, 1937]


London; Dear Grigson. My letters of acknowledgement have now all gone (to those who signed the "Times" letter [With TL[draft] letter to the Times Editor signed by 20 notables regarding Lewis, and the same letter in print.]


[n.p.] Dear Mrs. Gilbert. Thank you for letter and Gilbert for his and please forgive me for this long delay


[London] Sir. I have not in my life had very much to to with the Press.But in my recent experience,


[London] Cable received delighted Eliot portrait goin Durban stop Please cable payment


[London] Dear Naomi. The last few weeks has been [?able]. The criminal lunatics who having [?] the "false values"


London; Dear Sirs. The very odd communication which you have forwarded me is, I suppose, some kind of joke.


[London] Dear Sirs. My uncle, Mr. George Lewis, was, a long time ago, the president of the Bell, Lewis and Yates Coal


[London] Dear Dr. Brodfuhrer. I am in receipt of your letter of April 1 and also of a cheque


[London] Dear Moras. Thank you for your very friendly and informative letter.


[London] Sir. You haven't vouchsafed an answer to my letters.


[London] Dear Sir. I must apologize for not having answered your letter before.


[London] Sir. I must, with your leave, reply to the remarks of the Royal Academy spokesman,


London; Sir. Sir William Nicholson's solicitude regarding my O.M. does him great credit.


Dear Eliot. We met, you may remember, a long time ago. I am now sending you


[London] Dear Captain Talliffe. I was reminded yesterday you [o?] which, in the revolution


London; Sir. In my recent experience with the Press, in connection with my portrait


London; Dear Brown. I have only now found time to attend to the accounts of our


London; Dear Brown. Your letter amazes me. I was not aware, that it was incumbant on me


London; Dear Eliot. I have not heard from Spencer. As, I think you told me, he was only


London; My dear Rothenstein. Thank you for your letter. I was delighted to hear


Moved to folder 67.5 as date was corrected.


[London] Dear Hale. Your secretary read out on the telephone to me this afternoon a letter


London; My dear Rothenstein. So I have also to thank you for the sale of the Eliot


London; My dear Rothenstein. So I have also to thank you for the sale of the Eliot


London; My dear Rothenstein. It gave me very great pleasure to hear that you had likes


[London] Dear Dr. Brodführer. Thank you for your letter. I had not realised that


London; Dear Rothenstein. Enclosed article - I have a copy for "Mercury" so do not trouble


London; Dear Scott-James. I have your letter. - Your letter is, as you quite well know,


London; Dear Scott-James. I am sending you a copy, by registered post, of my reply


London; Dear Rothenstein. Thank you very much for your letter. As regards "Tarr", I wish that


London; Dear Rothenstein. Forgive my delay in answering your letter. I have been submerged


[Buffalo] Dear I. B. From Abbott you will have heard of my presence in states.


[Toronto] Glasses you prescribed mislaid in packing. Visited Toronto doctor.


[Buffalo] Dear Rothenstein. This place is round the corner: 4 minutes walk. I have my picture here


London; Dear Rothenstein. Your son John has the only copy of the article. When you get it, we can discuss details


[London] Dear Rothenstein


[London] Dear Rothenstein. I shall be here this week - I fit in not too much


London; Dear Rothenstein. For "Men & Memories" 1872-1909 & 1900-1922 the most sincere thanks.


London; Dear Mr. Davies. I am in receipt of your letter and account for printers corrections.


London; My dear Hale. The novel is going along grandly - and we want for it no gratiutous obstructions.


[London] Dear Rothenstein. I was in the Tate this afternoon & went to have another look at the "Carlyle"


[London] Dear Rothenstein. The Sun Engraving Co. have sent me advance sheets of the "P. Past" for next week.


London; Dear Rothenstein. Your letter about my book was very welcome and as is always the case it is from you


London; Dear Rothenstein. I am sorry to have to bother you again about the 100 [pounds] for the Ezra;


[London] Dear Naomi. What a filthy period we live in. My bank has stopped down on my credit


[London] Dear Sirs. I am in receipt of your letter, with enclosure, and I have never heard of "Mr. H. S. Ashton"


London; Dear Mr. Brown. Your information on Monday (contained in the letter you handed me) and the fact that I was unable


London; Dear Rothenstein. I want a holiday badly - to get out of this economic inferno for a short while


London; Dear Miss Pearn. I am writing directly to you as I understand that Mr. Higham is on holiday,


London; Dear Sir. I am in receipt of your letter. I noted that when this account was about to fall due


Toronto; Dear Honeyman. As I had to vacate London, I thought I might as well get over to New York


Buffalo; Dear Sir. I am the son of Charles E. Lewis (brother of George H. Lewis, of the Bell Lewis & Yeats Coalmining Co.


Toronto; Dear Mr. Taylor. Thank you for your cable. I will as you suggest contact Random House in N.Y.


Buffalo; Dear Honeyman. Your letter of Sept 13 has just reached me, forwarded from Toronto, for which very many thanks.


[Buffalo] My dear Honeyman. Thank you very much for getting the money cabled: and I am sorry that I had to bother you


[n.p.] Dear Sirs. I enclose herewith a money order, for sixteen dollars, being the head tax for two persons


[n.p.] Dear Sirs. I enclose herewith a money order, for sixteen dollars, being the head tax for two persons


Buffalo; Address Hotel Stuyvesant Buffalo NY. Hope we may meet Drop line above.


Buffalo; Dear Rothenstein. Thank you for your letter: & I am sorry to say we shall not meet here


[New York] Dear Mrs. Rothenstein. I should love to spend Christmas in Kentucky. But it is a long journey


Toronto; Toronto sorry missed you here hope we contact New York.


Buffalo; Remaining Buffalo Hotel Stuyvesant few days when do you arrive.


Buffalo; My dear Mr. Ransome. I have been moving about lately - mainly Canada : and your letter has just overtaken me [ On AL[draft] is another AL[draft] to Mr. Button.]


New York; Dear Mr. Button. New York is engulfing me for short while. As I may be moving from that hotel, [On same AL to a second AL[draft] to Miss Ethel Lewis]


New York; Dear Mr. Cummins. Our mutual friend Ezra enjoined me to get in touch with you, [On same AL to a second AL[draft] to W.L. McDermott. Plus a photo of the leaf.]


New York; Dear Rothenstein. New York is all electrified Christmas-trees but in spite of Father Christmas I have gone to work


New York; Dear Rothenstein. New York is all electrified Christmas-trees but in spite of Father Christmas I have gone to work [With two other AL[drafts] to Mr. Ransome and J.M. Dent & Son. Plus 2 photographs of the leaf.]


New York; Dear Mrs. Rothenstein.I should love to spend Christmas in Kentucky. But it is a long journey [Typed copy of draft in folder 79.]


[Toronto?] I have been asked to do some drawings or paintings, etc. I understand I have to be vouched for [not in Lewis' hand]


[London] My dear Eliot. Can I see you in your office (10-15 minutes) very soon?


[London] My dear Eliot. Can I see you in your office (10-15 minutes) very soon? [On verso of leaf is AL[draft] to Editor, "Contact"]


[London] Dear Kahma. I have written you a long letter - but I have lost it! Just at this moment I cannot write


London; Dear Mr. Kenner. I must apolgise for having delayed so long answering your letter. Health proccupations


[Toronto?] Proposed coming Ottawa tomorrow night. Hope to be able to see you


[Toronto?] Very much regret have again to postpone journey as a result of exposure during fire.


[Toronto?] My dear Stone. Very many congratulations upon Authoring (though why Mr. Eden should be selected


[Toronto?] Dear Stone. Thank you for the postcard which arrived yesterday. (By the way


[London] My dear Taylor. I have blamed myself for a long time now for not having at once returned you the book


[Toronto?] Dear Mr. MacDonald. Yesterday while I was packing my suitcase my wife fainted. Hence my telegram


[n.p.] My dear Wadsworth. I was delighted to hear that the pictures pleased you. As regards artists and what they feel


[n.p.] Dear Mr. Volkening. Is "How Green was my ValleY' or "The Corn is Green" anti- anything but a system that requires overhauling


[n.p.] ... Carnegie appointment? The latter is certainly my first choice. And once more I want to say how sincerely


[New York?] Dear Sir. It is now the manner, not the matter, of my article about which you affect to feel so strongly


[n.p.] You informed me was to be expected has recurred. The new diirector of Information is I am told one of the better


Toronto; ... difficult mss. to handle - not more so than a review-article. Again, this is to fully authorize you


New York; Dear Mr. Laughlin. Many thanks for your note and I shall look forward to seeing you


New York; Dear Rothenstein. I am back in New York. What was the name of the agent who attended to your lecture


New York; My dear Mr. Collins. I can see no valid reason whatever why you should continue to withold the chque


New York; Dear Rothenstein. Excuse please the delay in answering : I have been away in Washington..


New York; Dear Miss Moir. I have just had a telephone conversation with Mr. Slocum which I find very worrying,


New York; Dear Mr. Barr. Thank you for your letter, which I have just received. I was sorry to learn


[New York] Dear Hale. At last we are in touch - your letter of March 27 is just to hand. When I arrived here


[New York] Sir. The first instalment of angry letters gets us nowhere. In your April Fool number I announce the


[New York] Dear Sir. I am anxious to obtain information regarding the birth of a certain Charles Edward Lewis, [With reply from Registrar's Office on 2nd leaf.]


[New York] Dear Sir. Enclosed is application form, duly filled in (all but date of death, of which I am uncertain,


London; Dear Mr. Colston Leigh. It is along time since I wrote you. Did my letter by any chance not reach you?


[Sag Harbor,NY] Dear Mr. Amster. Difficulties have prevented me from getting this to you before. "The Childermas"


Sag Harbor, NY; Dear Soskin. I have just received your note, and the Morrow enclosures. Nothing of course can be done


[New York?] Dear Sir: I wish to establish my American citizenship. The following are the main points at issue:


[New York?] Dear Sirs. I am in receipt of your letter of date Sept 25, informing me that you require a renewal


Dear Sirs. In New York on Monday I discovered that it was necesssary to obtain a new passport,


[New York] Dear Sweeny. You asked me I believe to let you know how I got on with my work


[New York] Dear Barry. I have now been for nearly twelve months in New York & i's neighbourhood


New York; My dear Morley. When first I came to New York and we had lunch together, you said something


[New York] Dear Barry. You will have heard that Mr. Barr telephoned me today (when I came to the Museum


Toronto; Dear Mr. Button. Here is the "Who's Who" for Wyndham Lewis. It was completed by a young disciple of mine:


Toronto; Dear Mr. McLean. I am in touch for a while - for some days I shall be at the above address [On same leaf a second draft to Terrance W. L. MacDermott, same date, with photostat.]


[Toronto] My dear Coward. I have just arrived here in Canada - my "permet de sejour" for the U.S.A. having expired.


[Toronto] My dear Mr. Hoffman. I have reached my destination: Geoffrey Stone will have conveyed to you my thanks,


Toronto; Dear Slocum. I really don't know what to say about all this. It would be an extrememly serious matter


[Toronto] Dear MacDermott. Now back from Ottawa. I believe that I made certain arrangements there


[Toronto] Dear Wilberforce. Your letter dated 6/11/40 has just reached me. It is indeed bad luck that I missed


Toronto; Dear McCurry. Here is the first half of a talk or lecture. It is really an answer to "Why Art?" - the recurrent question.


Toronto; Dear Mr. Barr. I had to leave New York precipitately and since then have been travelling about.


Toronto; Dear Stone. For the first time since our arrival I now have a chance of establishing myself.


[Toronto] ... It is obvious that the [fees?] assigned for "resident artists" by the Carnegie would be adequate,


[Toronto] Dear Madam. It may be that Dr. Pierce is away, so I am addressing this letter to you. - I want to make quite


[Toronto] Dear Sir. The proposal in Mr. Foster's letter this morning that I should do a "facctual" article on "Canada's war effort"


[Toronto] Dear Sir.Enclosed is a pamphlet published this week by the Ryerson Press here in Toronto.


[Toronto] Dear Sir James Dunn. A letter from Mr. J. S. McLean has just reached me, in which he asks me to get


Ottowa; My dearest Putschlwutschl! Have been to wyzing hither & thither this morning. It is now 1/4 to 1 & before


[Toronto] Answer mailed to your just arrived. Thanks information suggest explore chances university appointment art


[Toronto] Dear Eliot. The bearer of this note, Douglas Le Pan, is a young man who left Harvard a month or so ago,


[Toronto] Dear Mr. Pierce. Let me say to start with how glad I am that "The Vulgar Streak" is liked by you.


[Toronto?] Dear Dr. Pierce. An hour or so ago I received the page-proofs, and am immediately returning them to you.


[Toronto] Dear Dr. Pierce. On Friday I [?sent sic] you by registered mail, the mss. you will be sending it to be set up today


[Toronto] Telegraphed you Wednesday What is happening. Did corrected proofs arrive last week or not.


[Toronto] Sorry must refuse allow deletion of word anglosaxony


[Toronto] Dear Barry. Thank you for your letter. It is irritating that I cannot get an answer out of Mr. Barr.


[Toronto] Dear Barry. Thank you for your letter. It would be of no profit to me, you will readily understand -


[Toronto] Dear Barry. Mr. Barr has suddenly answered my letter of a couple of months ago. I write to one member


[Toronto] Dear Barry. With unwonted, and a little alarming, swiftness Mr. Barr has answered my letter to you.


Toronto; Dear Volkening. I am in receipt of your letter and have not got the mss. through the customs.


Toronto; Dear Sir. I learn that men from your office have again visited Thomas Cooks. The reason that I have not


Toronto; Dear John. How are you getting on? For eighteen months I have been in the land of the Yankees.


Toronto; Dear John. How are you getting on? For eighteen months I have been in the land of the Yankees.


Toronto; Dear Zwemmer. How are you? I heard a short while ago from Mrs. Sainsbury (who is here) that her husband


Montreal; Dear Madam. Lest any other communications intended for me should find their way, for whatever reason,


[Montreal] My dear Dr. Pierce. First let me thank you for your elegram and for arranging to get off the proofs


Ottawa; Dear Poochums. I got off the proofs to Toronto - worked until close on midnight (copying out took longer)


[Montreal] My dear Dr. Pierce. First: "A League that Works"! It is rather like forcing Augustus John to wear a top-hat


[Montreal] Dear Mr. McLean. Your letter of June 3 has only just reached me. For the


[Montreal] Dear Dr. Pierce. Nothing has reached me so far (except your letter this morning) so now I shall not have


[Montreal] Dear Dr. Pierce. As the publication date for the pamphlet is now not far off, a few things have to be considered.


Toronto; Dear Mr. Brockington. Here is the pamphlet I promised you in the note I sent round while in Ottawa.


[Toronto] Dear Dr. Pierce. Instead of sending off "Anglosaxony" at once to England, I am correcting it into a full-length book.


[Toronto] Dear Mr. Wilberforce. A pamphlet is enclosed with this letter, which you may care to add to your arsenal


[Toronto] Dear Grierson. Enclosed is a pamphlet, just published here in Toronto - Democracy, I know, is not your pigeon


[Toronto] Dear MacLeish. Enclosed is a pamphlet, published here this week, for English publication


[Toronto] My dear Mr. Gladston Murray. Enclosed is the pamphlet I was telling you about, published this week in Toronto.


[Toronto] Dear Mr. Sandwell. Just a note to say I am putting into shape two articles which I think you will like,


Toronto; Dear Sir James Dunn. Thank you for your letter of June 23rd which has just been forwarded me. - I came down here


Toronto; Dear Mr. McLean. Early in September I shall be returning to England. - Certain arrangements have to be made,


[Toronto] Dear Mr. Wilberforce. It was extremely kind of you to write to Sir Gerald Campbell about me:


Toronto; Dear Sir. The proposal in Mr. Foster's letter this morning that I should do a "factual" article on "Canada's War Effort" [The draft of this letter is in folder 49, box 69.]


[Toronto] Dear Jackson. I want to thank you really very profoundly for your consistent kindness and cordiality to me


London; My dear Geo. A letter of compaint! - For Jeezus sake refrain from dumping on me the idiot cuttings E.P. forwards


[Toronto] Dear Mr. Brockington. For a few days I have been up in Montreal and found your letter on my return.


Toronto; Dear Moore. Here is an attempt to reach you with a note; but since I do not know if you still live at Will Walk,


[Toronto] My dear Dr. Pierce. Excuse me for not answering your letter yesterday, but I was rushing about all day,


[Toronto] Dear Mr. Foster. I thought it better to get you an article written, which I now enclose, rather than send you


[Toronto] Dear Mr. Foster. Thank you very much for your letter, and I was pleased and encouraged to hear that Sir Gerald


[Toronto] Dear Mr. McLean. Before he left I saw A. J. Jackson and he had a notion which I think might be


[Toronto] Dear Mr. Foster. Thank you for your letter. I will see if I can find out anything about "Canada's War Effort,"


[Toronto] Dear Mr. Foster. By the same post I am sending a letter to Sir Gerald Campbell. Since this will, I assume,


Toronto; Dear Hale. I forget what I said to you in my last letter. But as far as I can recall it was not much -


Toronto; Dear Sir James Dunn. I gave you a call at the end of last week but found you were no longer at Port Credit.


Toronto; Dear Mr. Brockington. I return to the charge! - but with a different objective this time.


Toronto; Dear Symons. After a long stay in the States I am here - in this blasted ice-box.


Toronto; Dear Dr. Pierce. Six or seven weeks ago, introduced by you, I communicated with Mr. Sandwell,


Toronto; Dear Dr. Pierce. As quite at the beginning of our acquaintance I informed you that my reception in Toronto,


[Toronto] Dear Miss Cristophorides. Your telegram has just arrived. The various arrangements I had to make


[Toronto] Dear Miss Cristophorides. Thank you for your letters which I have just received. I have got my working glasses,


[Toronto] Dear Miss Cristophorides. I have just dispatched a letter by hand to Mr. Hepburn (he did not call up


[Toronto] Dear Mr. Hepburn. Sir James Dunn suggested I advise you of my return, upon reaching Toronto.


Toronto; Dear Dr. May. I have been working over here in America since the start of the war:


[Toronto] Dear Stone. Please excuse my long delay in communicating - I am back as you see in this godforsaken city


[Toronto] Dear Naomi. To start with, I hope you are well, that you have been able to get some work done,


[Toronto] My dear Mr. Barr. If New York is brutal and Babylonian, in this place it is as if someone were sitting on your [cheek?]


[Toronto] Dear Mrs. Lamont. You will remember when I was in New York 18 months ago we discussed the prospects


[Toronto] Dear Sirs. A letter has just reached me from my London publisher Robert Hale, who is publishing in October


[Toronto] Dear Dr. Pierce. Today I saw a copy of "Saturday Night." As usual there is no sign in the Contents of my


[Toronto] Dear Stone. Whether I have been framed, or whether it is something else, I don't know.


[Toronto] Dear Dr. Pierce. TThere is a hiatus in my painting activity - I am waiting here in Toronto for a personnage


[Toronto] Dear Dr. Pierce. I am very pleased to hear that your cold did not develop into anything serious


Toronto; My dear Morley. For some time one of my eyes has been running down hill, until indeed I can scarcely see


[Toronto] Dear Dr. Pierce. I was sent back here post-haste from the Maritime Provinces (this is in confidence)


[Toronto] Dear Barr. Many thanks for your kind letter. A helping hand from you, in the matter of some small appointment


[Toronto] Dear Barry. My left eye was injured when I was round fifteen years old and has never been very good.


[Toronto] Dear Mrs. Lamont. Thank you very much for your very kind letter and I am ashamed to say I had confused


[Toronto] Dear Dr. Pierce. Here is the drawing - it is I think so successful that it is best not to bother about No. 1


[Toronto] My dear Miss Christophorides. A few hours ago somebody rang me up, who told me that she was the secretary


[Toronto] Dear Dr. Pierce. A half an hours ago the secretary of the Speaker (Miss Pritchett) rang me up.


[Toronto] Dear Dr. Pierce. It was very kind of you to accomodate me in the matter of the cheque for thirty dollars,


[Toronto] Dear Sweeney. The other day - it was as a matter of fact 5 or 6 weeks ago - I had an unpleasant surprise.


[Toronto] Dear Mr. Hitchcock. Enclosed is a copy of the "Vulgar Streak," and I shall inform Robert Hale that I have sent it


[Toronto] Dear Sir. I should to bextremely obliged if you would send me a cheque for my article. My arrangement


[Toronto] Dear Morley. The other day I had a very unpleasant surprise. For twenty years I had worn the same glasses,


Toronto; Dear Mrs. Lamont. Your letter and enclosure have just reached me and I cannot tell you how grateful I am


[Toronto] Dear McLeish. I have an ambition, and you might be able tohelp me realize it. I dearly long to be a "resident artist"


[Toronto] Dear Barry. Thank you for your letter and I was very sorry to hear about Abbott.


[Toronto] My dear Mr. Ransom. Since last corresponding with you I have been, first, living in Long Island


[Toronto] Dear Barry. Thank you very much for the cheque for fifty dollars; and it is very good news that this book


[Toronto] Dear Mr. Barr. I was very glad to hear, when you called me today, that you would like to acquire a few drawings


[Toronto; Dear Barr. In my letter a short while ago I told you I wanted to get a job of some kind.


Toronto; My dear Barry. I suppose, as I have not heard from you, that the publisher who was reading the mss. last week-end


[Toronto] My dear Canfield. Since seeing you last in New York, I have been - after my year in N.Y. & its neighborhood


[Toronto] Dear Carlow. I was glad to get your letter from Lisbon. It mus indeed have been a queer feeling to travel


Toronto; Dear Sir. I am in receipt of your letter of Oct. 30, demanding 40 [pounds?] for a bill for electricity


[Toronto] Dear Barry. My letters probably seem just a lot of words to you. Hard-up - hell, aren't we all hard-up?


Toronto; Dear Mr. Brockington. Some time ago I sent you a letter and enclosed two pages of a coloured supplement


Toronto; Dear MacLeish. I have just received your letter and am extremely grateful to you for having spoken to Mr. Paul Douglass,


[Toronto] Dear Mr. Alsop. Thank you so much for so very kindly giving me news of your (I assume) son's whereabouts


Toronto; Dear Hale. I should have written you before but have been much occupied and have waited for a relatively quiet spell.


[Toronto] Dear Barry. Heartfelt thanks for the postal order for thirty dollars. That fixes things for a week anyway


[Toronto] Dear Mrs. Lamont. Your letter just received, and it is awfully good to you to keep me in your mind in this way.


[Toronto] Dear Barr. I really can't thank you enough for taking all this trouble. Let us hope that the proposal


[Toronto] My dear Sweeney. It was very cheering to get your kind letter. All that you said about a job was of course depressing:


[Toronto] Dear Mr. Brockington. Thank you very much for so kindly returning me the cuttings from "Picture Post".


[Toronto] My dear Sweeney. It was very cheering to get your kind letter. Cheering, I mean, simply to hear from you,


[Toronto] Dear Wilson. Since seeing you in New York I have been living up in this sanctimonius ice-box - my visitors


[Toronto] Dear Mr. Evans. Thank you very much for your note and for having passed on the information about Mr. Dollard


Toronto; Dear Barry. I have given a man up here a batch of drawings to sell for me, and, as he appears very interested,


Toronto; Dear Sirs. Enclosed is the mss. of a book, the title of ("The Ideas with Which we Fight") describes its purpose.


[Toronto] Dear Sir. Enclosed is a short story, which I hope you may like. You may be familliar with one other of my books


[Toronto] My dear Barr. I am now happy to be able to tell you that the die is cast, and that Mr. Jameson, of the Library


[Toronto] Dear Barry. No letter has come this morning, and things are taking on an increasingly


[Toronto] My dear Mr. Brewer. You will remember that, in the days before you were


Toronto; My dear Sweeney. I am glad to be able to tell you that it is to be Brewer -


toronto; Dear Honeyman, I think it is time I sent you a bulletin, and received one in return.


[Toronto] Dear Barr. Very many thanks for your letter: this is extremely cheering news.


[Toronto] Dear Barry. The cheque for thirty dollars reached me last week, for which tremendous thanks.


[Toronto] Dear MacLeish. By the time this reaches you it will be three weeks since Paul Douglass


[Toronto] Dear Barry. It may be that you have mailed me a letter & it has taken longer than was


[Toronto] Dear Barry. On Monday morning (yesterday) I had seven cents left - the friend


Toronto; Dear Mr. Jameson. I have just received your letter, and although I am sorry that the


[Toronto] Dear Barry. I was sorry to hear that you had concussion and hope, as you imply,


[Toronto] Dear Wilson. Thank you for your letter - I will write to the "New Republic" [Second draft on same leaf to the Editor, New Republic, same date. With facsimile photostat.]


[Toronto] My dear Sweeney. I can give you no information as yet, tbut will keep you posted as to what happens.


[Toronto] Dear Mr. Jameson. It has occurred to me that when the choice of the college has been settled,


[Toronto] Dear Barry. I refrain from asking any questions. The Christmas black-out approaches [On verso are drafts to Alfred Barr, Jr. and James Johnson Sweeney, dated Dec.16, 1941.]


[Toronto] Dear Mr. Jameson. Thank you for your kind letter, and, although very disappointed


[Toronto] Dear Dr. Pierce. Thank you for your note, and I was sorry to hear that the indisposition


Toronto; Dear Mr. Jameson. Upon receiving your letter I wrote to Mr. Brewer at Olivet:


Toronto; My dear Dr. May. Your letter reached me a few days ago. I am very grateful for your cordial reception


[Toronto] Delighted to hear about President Keezer. So far no letter from Keezer has reached me.


[Toronto] Letter arrived from Reed College. Letter sent Tudor Hotel, Washington in error.


[Toronto] Dear Mrs. Lamont. The enclosed letter from Dr. Dollard speaks for itself. It looks as if


[Toronto] As to Brewer's writing to the Carnegie Corporation at all, except to ask them [3 drafts writing about Brewer helping him find a college to work at.]


[Toronto] Dear Mr. Gladstone Murry. Mr. Force (I believe that's the name) has just rung me up


[Toronto] Dear Barry. I must apologize for the delay in acknowledging the two notes, [Never sent this letter, on verso is the Jan.3, 1942 letter that was sent.]


[Toronto] Dear Grigson. Heaven knows if this address will still find you - but I will send a copy


[Toronto] Dear Grigson. ... I have no news about myself except that I am stuggling to make a living


Toronto; Dear Mr. MacDonald. Some weeks ago I wrote to your office - not to you personally -


[Toronto] My dear Mr. Brewer. I must apologize for the delay in answering your letter


[Toronto] Dear Mr. Jameson. Thank you for your letter and it is splendid news that you have


[Toronto] Dear Mr. Jameson. Here is a postscript to my yesterdays letter - which told you how


[Toronto] Dear Barry. It has turned out at last (I have the letter informing me this morning)


Toronto; Dear Mr. Jameson. Enclosed is a letter from Olivet. So Brewer had a "resident artist" already!


Toronto; Dear MacLeish. Events of such magnitude as those of the past month here, I expect,


Toronto; Dear Barry. Monday morning has come: and faced by a new batch of difficulties,


Toronto; Dear Barry. Thank you really very much indeed for the thirty dollars, the money-order


Toronto; Dear Kennington. You letter date May 28 has just arrived. Thank you for having


Toronto; D Mõv. It was splendid to see your fair fist again, and to know, from the spirit


Toronto; My dear Docker. Your letter - like all I receive from England, for that matter - saddened me.


Toronto; Sir. A review of my book, "The Vulgar Streak," containing offensive personal matter


Toronto; Dear Spence. Since last seeing you I have been up here, mainly painting portraits.


Toronto; Dear Mr. Taylor. On such a slight acquaintanceship it is, I fear, a little forward of me


Toronto; Dear Mrs. Hamilton. I should have acknowledged before your kind letter. Has any new light


Toronto; Dear Mr. Jameson. I was overjoyed this morning to receive your letter with the good news [Verso of leaf is a draft of the telegram to Jameson sent same day.]


Toronto; Dear Sir. A letter has just reached me from Mr. R. D. Jameson, of the Library of Congress,


Toronto; Dear Mr. Keezer. Your letter has just reached me, and very greatly appreciate the welcome you have accorded


Toronto; Dear Mrs. Lamont. Sometimes you may have wondered what had happened to me and to my plans for becoming


Toronto; Dear Mr. Jameson. The letter from Dr. Keezer (dated Jan.13) cartoon of which you received I suppose about Jan.15,


Toronto; Dear Sir. Enquiries regarding my address, said to emmanate from "somebody in the literary section of the Rockefeller


Toronto; My dear Wells. Your letter reached me, via Robert Hale, a few days ago, and it gave me very great pleasure.


Toronto; Dear Barry. Excuse my delay in acknowledging your letter: I have been waiting to see how things developed,


Toronto; Dear Mr. Jameson. Since dispatching my letter (of which I sent you a cartoon) to Portland, Oregon, I have heard nothing:


Toronto; My dear Mr. Jameson. Thank you for your kind letter: it is as you say, I know, time is needed to complete such an arrangement.


Toronto; Dear Barry. I am still stonewalling [up here?] as but I can, awaiting the news of my deliverance from Canada


Toronto; Dear Barry. Matters get no better up here and I send you accordingly this further note,


Toronto; Dear Mr. Keezer. Have you had any news yet of the Carnegie? Seeing the reat distances to be travelled by the mail,


Toronto; Dear Dr. Dollard. Writing directly to you is I expect highly unorthodox, but informality in such times as ours is I hope excusable.


Toronto; Dear Barry. A letter from you has not, I hope, gone astray? Shaould you at any time write me and not hear withing a few days,


Toronto; Dear Mrs. Lamont. Thank you for your letter - which I delayed answering until I had news about the last triumphant phase


Toronto; Dear MacLeish. A month ago I wrote to Keezer again - the college president you found for me at Portland, Oregon.


Toronto; Dear Prof. Davis. Enclosed is a letter from Dr. Dollard (the assistant to the President of the Carnegie Corp),


Toronto; Dear Brockington. It would probably be an illusion to suppose you are less busy at present than a few months ago:


Toronto; Dear Gladstone Murray. Since I last met you I have been in Toronto mostly. I have become something like an involutary squatter.


Toronto; Dear Brockington. Your letter of March 26 gave me much encouragement - I have delayed writing


Toronto; Dear MacLeish. If I ever get out of this hotel room alive - I call it my "Tudor period" -


Toronto; Dear Kennington. Yesterday I talked on the telephone with Carolw, (passing through Montreal on his way to Rio).


Toronto; Dear Mr. Taylor. On the strength of a chance meeting I should not care to thrust my personal cares upon you. [Written on the 24th, not sent until April 30, 1942.]


Toronto; Dear Mr. Sandwell. When I got home I had a look at my cartoons and to my horror found all the 3 witches


Toronto; Dear Brockington. It was splendid news that you had already taken steps, and that Mr. Robertson [Second draft written on April 30, 1942.]


Toronto; My dear Spencer. Since we last met the world has not grown a quieter place. How has the war affected your activities?


Toronto; My dear Sweeney. I am sorry I did not let you know : the fact is I did not want to bother you anymore about all that.


Toronto; My dear Spencer. Thank you very much indeed for lending me a hand so promptly in my search for an academic retreat.


Toronto; Dear Mr. Sandwell. It was extremely kind of you to have the cheque which reached me on Saturday morning, speeded up.


Toronto; My dear Docker. My 2 letters, one to you & one to Mov, probably are at the bottom of the Atlantic. I wrote you at once


Toronto; Dear Mr. Sandwell. I did not realize that yesterday was a public holiday [Written on the same leaf, same side an AL[draft to Leonard Brockington, May 26, 1942. Included is a photostat of the leaf.]


Toronto; My dear Barry. I return to the charge, in my attempt to obtain from you the name of the literary agent to whom you gave my novel.


Toronto; Dear Sweeney. You have, I imagine, proved unsucessful in your attempt to find a job for me


Toronto; Dear Barr. You no doubt heard about Joe Brewer's having one "resident artist" all the time, coyly tucked away up in Olivet,


Toronto; Dear Mr. Brockington. It is of course very disappointing that the censorship job at Ottawa did not materialize,


Toronto; Dear Grierson. I have been corresponding with Brockington and in a letter I have just received he suggests among other things


Toronto; Dear Mrs. Lamont. Dr. Dollard of the Carnegie Corporation wrote me to the effect that this committee was discontinuing their grant


Toronto; Dear Spencer. As no letter has reached me from Colgate or anywhere else I conclude that your answer is the same


Toronto; Dear Mr. Martin. A letter has just reached me from Dr. May of Darton, S.A. I had informed him of my desire to transfer to a


Toronto; Dear Mr. Brockington. In this morning's paper I see that you are coming to Toronto to speak later in the month [Same leaf starts an AL[draft] to Eric Kennington, Jane 10, 1942. Also included in folder is a photostat of the first leaf.]


Toronto; Dear Naomi. The months slide along and it will soon be three years that I have stuck it out upon this continent,


Toronto; Dear Mr. Martin. In my communication of yesterday I forgot to enclose this little book. I perhaps should point out


Toronto; Dear Sweeney. Thank you for your kind letter and for having written to Mr. Rich. As you had not heard from him at once


Toronto; Dear Mr. MacCaughie. I should be very glad if I could be of help in so [?] a plan as you hint at in your letter.


Toronto; Dear Mr. MacCaughie. Thank you for your further letter (of June 16) which arrived this morning.


Toronto; Dear Mr. MacCaughie. I have your further letter this morning. All I can do is to repeat what I said yesterday


Toronto; Dear Docker. I wonder if my two letters ever reached you? I sent one to you and one to Mov, at the time you both wrote me -


Toronto; Dear Sir. At present I am in correspondence with Mr. Eric Kennington. At Lord Carlow's suggestion - who passed through here


Toronto; Dear Mary Hutchinson. Your letter (of May 5) has just reached me. The Red Cross Sale will probably be over by the time you get this.


Toronto; Dear Mr. McLean. When I wrote you last summer I was trying, you will recall, to move on: or rather to move back - to England.


Toronto; Dear Sweeney. First, let me thank you deliriously for the cheque for fifty dollars. It will make all the difference =


Toronto; Dear Sir. Two or three months alo I wrote to Mr. Eric Kennsigton - at the suggestion of Lord Ccarlow, a friend of ours -


Toronto; Dear Naomi. This is going to be air-mailed, and a carton [?] will go by ship. One or the other ought to reach you.


Toronto; Dear Sir. Here I will recapitulate briefly what I wrote you earlier. I have recieved not letter from you, but it may quite well


Toronto; My dear Wells. Your letter - which you have long ago forgotten you wrote probably - has been on my trail for many a month.


Toronto; Dear Brigson. Once or twice during my time over hear I have written. Probably the letter got [?] sunk, or blown up on the way. [Second leaf contains another AL[draft] to Louis MacNeice, July 13, 1942. Included are photostats of both sides of leaf 2.]


Toronto; My dear Madam. My friend Mr. A. Y. Jackson told me of your visit to him, and also of your connection with the university.


Toronto; Dear Miss West. Thank you for your letter. I must apologise for the delay in answering Mr. MacCaughie's very interesting letter


Toronto; My dear Rothenstein. As you notice, I have landed up here. - New York, as you probably foresaw it would, ended in disaster.


Toronto; My dear Rothenstein. As you notice, I have landed up here. - New York, as you probably foresaw it would, ended in disaster. [Typed version of letter in folder 82.]


Toronto; Dear Rothenstein. It seems a long time since you used to come to my studio in Notting Hill Gate, after painting


Toronto; Dear Rothenstein. It seems a long time since you used to come to my studio in Notting Hill Gate, after painting [Same letter as folder 84.]


Toronto; Dear Barry. You did not answer my letter, instead you return me to book. -But I have several copies of the book.


Toronto; Dear Sirs. Last year Mr. Foster, who at that time was apparently assisting Sir Gerald Campbell, suggested that I write


Toronto;Dear Mr. MacCaughie. I have now read enough of the mss. you sent me to write you a bit. -The backgrounds of this king


Toronto; Dear Moore. Here is an attempt to reach you with a note; but since I do not know if you still live at Well Walk,


Toronto; Dear Miss West. Thank you for your letter of the 18th. I enclose a not for Mr. MacCaughie.


Toronto; Dear Miss West. Thank you very much for the photographs which I have just received. I am very obliege to you for this


Toronto; Dear Mr. McKechnie. Thank you for the cheque for two hundred dollars which I received this morning and for the message [With second AL[draft] to J.S. McLean on same side of leaf; with photostat of this leaf.]


Toronto; Dear Father Murphy. I have received your letter of July 25, forwarded from Dents, and should be very glad to give a talk [Draft has second AL[draft] to James Johnson Sweeney, July 30, 1942. Also photostat of leaf with drafts on it.]


Toronto; Dear Miss West. Thank you very much for your letter, and the enclosure from Mr. MacCaughie. [On same side of leaf is second AL[draft] to [David Kahma], August 6, 1942. Included is 1 photostat of leaf recto.]


Toronto; Dear Mr. MacCaughie. I have received your letter of Aug 12, with the various proposals for my translation


Toronto; Dear Mr. MacCaughie. By this morning's mail I have received your letter & plan of the house.


Toronto; Dear Duncan. My letter to Kennsington reached him with unexpected rapidity, and his answer came whizzing back,


Toronto; Dear Mr. MacCaughie. Your letter of Aug 17th just reached me. As to when I could depart from Toronto,


Toronto; My dear Mr. MacCaughie. Your letter of Aug. 17th has just arrived. You will in the meanwhile have received my letter


Toronto; Dear Mr. MacCaughie. Last night I heard disturbing accounts regarding the new situatioin that will apparently come into being


Toronto; Dear Mr. MacCaughie. Your letter of Aug. 19 just arrived. - At last it seems to me the naterial issue has acquired a shape


Toronto; Dear Mr. MacCaughie.Your letter of Aug 21 has just arrived. - I have been so busy in my letters arriving at a solution


Toronto; Dear Sir Kenneth Clark. Thank you very much for your letters. - Both arrived at the same time, as you forgot the air-stamp


Toronto; Dear Mr. MacCaughie.Thank you for your three letters, and cartoon of "Budget". -I gather from a perusal of these


Toronto; Dear Mr. MacCaughie. Last night a special delivery letter reached me. It was much less effusive in tone I thought


Toronto; My dear Mr. Kingsley Martin. Since I am a kind of involutary squatter in this country, and since there is now a


Toronto; Dear Mr. MacCaughie. Your letter of Sept. 1 had just arrived. You may put your mind at rest as regards the cheque,


Toronto; Dear Father Murphyy. Except that I have been very much driven for the last week or so, I am afraid I have no very valid excuse


Toronto; Dear Mr. Weeks. Your letter of July 30 has been trailing me around the Canadian bush, & has only now caught up with me. [On same leaf, verso a second AL[draft] to [?] McKenzie, September 12, 1942.]


Toronto; Dear Mr. MacCaughie. Let us have another try, then. But it would not be possible for me to move on immediately.


Toronto; My dear Sister Honora. I owe you my deepest apolgies for the delay in answering your letter. The fact is I have been trying


Toronto; Dear Sweeney. Thank you for your letter. Rich I am afraid is not going to be any use: making all allowance for the fact


Toronto; My dear Docker. Your news of Mov is very dispiriting. It is I suppose the excitement and strain of the last 3 years.


Toronto; Dear Mr. MacCaughie. Your letter of Sept. 14 has just arrived. I continue to be puzzled. I read as follows


Toronto; Dear Reid. I was much flattered & pleased to learn that you had acquired a little picture. From the description I could not recall


Toronto; Dear Sir. I am in receipt of your letter of Aug. 5. Its contents was to me a painful surprise.


Toronto; Dear Kennington. I waited for some news before I ansered you; but I have the other day a most charming & friendly letter


Toronto; My dear Rothenstein. Thank you for your friendly and informative letter (and copy of same) as also for the very interesting Tate


Toronto; Dear Mr. MacCaughie. Your letter dated Sept 16 arrived yesterday morning. Thank you for the detailed proposals.


Toronto; My dear Mr. MacCaughie. A feverish cold has laid me low. As a consequence you may notice a slight diminuation


Toronto; Dear Mr. MacCaughie. This will be a brief note, I am afraid, because I have had a very violent cold and am still


Toronto; Dear Mr. MacCaughie. Last Friday I worte you (special delivery) and I imagine that you might not have received that letter


Toronto; Dear Mr. MacCaughie. I have just received by special delivery your letter dated Sept.29. Thank you for your excellent news


Toronto; My dear Sister Honora. We seem unlucky in our correspondence - when your note of Sept. 28 arrived my eyes were streaming


Toronto; Dear Mr. MacCaughie. Your letter of Sept. 30 reached me this morning. Two notes of mine are by now in your hands,


Toronto; My dear Father Murphy. I am awfully sorry to have to bother you, but could you possibly get that photograph of myself [With second AL[draft] to Edward Weeks, October 2, 1942 on same side of leaf. Included is a photostat of the leaf.]


Toronto; Dear Sir Kenneth Clark. A communication has reached me from the finance department of the Ministery of Information.


Toronto; Dear Mr. MacCaughie. As no telegram turned up Monday am yesterday I supposed that the draft was coming by mail,


Toronto; Dear Sir Kenneth Clark. I send these notes by air, as mail that goes by ship is so liable to meet with a mishap just now.


Toronto; Dear Frances. What a bad cold you had! We have been trampled under foot by it for 2 weeks now, and it still comes back


Toronto; Dear Mr. MacCaughie. Thank you for your letter and for all the pleasant messages. I did not very clearly gather I am afraid


Toronto; Dear Reid. I am out of bed. My cold appeared to have gone, but it keep returning. This is a dreadful nuisance [With second AL[draft] to J. Stanley Murphy, Oct.23, 1942. Included is a photostat of the leaf.]


Toronto; Dear Mr. Burgess. I should have answered your letter earlier, but concentration upon the affairrs of the mucous membrane


Toronto; Dear Mrs. Robson. Thank you for your letter of Oct. 25 which has just reached me. I shall be here during December


Toronto; My dear John. It was a great pleasure to get your letter and therein to catch a glimpse of you in some smoky den in Soho [Verso containsAL[draft] to Eric Kennington, November 5, 1942 plus second leaf. Included is photostat of the beginning of the Kennington draft.]


Toronto; Dear Palmer. Thank you for your letter, and the enclosures from the Ministry of Information. As to the latter, [With AL[draft] on verso to the Secretary of the Artists Committe, Nov.5, 1942 with copy.]


Toronto; Dear Sir Kenneth Clar. I have received the follwing communication for the Ministry of Information. "You are asked to


Toronto; Dear Mr. Brown. Are you still in the Baker Street Branch, or has the man moved you around as it has moved most other


Toronto; Dear Sir Thomas Beecham. I have often read in the newspapers of your presence, sometimes to the east of me, [With second AL[draft] on verso to J. Stanley Murphy, Nov. 17, 1942.]


Toronto; Dear Sir Kenneth Clark. Here is a supplement to my letter of Nov. 11. The more I find out about what comes under


Toronto; My dear Moore. Since we met I have been a considerable traveller. You, I believe, apart from transferring your country-quarters


Toronto; My dear Rothenstein. A bad attack of influenza lasting about a month has confused things. I have here a rough draft of a letter


Toronto; My dear Rothenstein. A bad attack of influena lasting a month has confused things. [Typed copies of letter in folder 48]


Toronto; My dear Kennington. The enclosed letter, dated as you see a long time ago, has, like myself, been marooned here


Toronto; Dear Mr. Burgess. Your offer to me yesterday was of the most extraordinarily generous nature.


Toronto; Dear Sir, I am in receipt of your letter of the 16th September, 1942, Ref. No. GP/55/267, and beg to confirm


Toronto; Dear Sir. I am in receipt of your communication of September 17, sent on to me by Mr. Palmer


Toronto; Dear Sirs. I must apologize for this long delay in answering your letter. The fact is I have been attempting to obtain


Toronto; Dear Mr. Burgess. I am sorely tempted to accept your tremendously generous offer of last week (which touched me


Toronto; Dear Mr. Burgess. I feel I should write you to say how exceedingly grateful I am to you [On verso AL[draft] to British High Commisioner, Ottowa, same date. With photostat of verso.]


Toronto; Dear Mr. MacLean. About five weeks ago Douglas Duncan told me he had shown you the communications


Toronto; [Typed address; air mail sticker, envelope to John Rotherstein.]


Toronto; Dear Mr. Warburton. Thank you for your letter of Dec. 4th which I would have answered earlier


Toronto; Dear Reid. Thank you for Christmas card & I liked your excellent design. You should do more of those


Toronto; My dear Duncan. Before the new year I had better add to my oral acknowledgement and


Toronto; Dear Sweeney. It was very nice to have your Christmas message, and my wife joins me in wishing you and Laura


[n.p.] Dear Mr. Kenning. Thank you for your letter. I assumed that you had thrown the offensive missive


Toronto; Dear Mr. MacDonald. Thank you very much for so kindly giving your personal attention to the matter


[Toronto] Dear Father Murphy. Your letter has just arrived (it has "not at address" on envelope, meaning I suppose


Toronto; Dear Mr. MacDonald. Some weeks ago I wrote to you office - not to you personally [On verso is AL[draft] to the Ministry of Information Director, [Jan., 1943]]


Toronto; Dear Mr. Thomson. Thank you very much for your letter. You have confirmed me in my view of the matter


Toronto; My dear Naomi. Thank you for your beautiful long circumstantial letter. You lucky cow-herd and grandmother!


Toronto; Dear Mr. Macdonald. Your note informing me that you have heard from England I found awaiting me [On same side is AL[draft] to J. Stanley Murphy, Jan.26, 1943. With photostat of leaf.]


Toronto; My dear Moore. Thank you for your letter dated Jan. 5 which reached me yesterday afternoon, and for your having


Toronto; Dear Carlow. Things have become more uncertain here since our meeting. Have you any cash to spare?


Toronto; Dear Carlow. Our letters crossed - and did not yours perhaps provide a clue to how my present problem,


Toronto; Dear Sir Kenneth Clark. I have just received a letter from Henry Moore (dated Jan. 5) in which he tells me you had met


Toronto; My dear Kennington. A day or two ago Carlow came over from Montreal. We spent a pleasant evening --


Toronto; Dear Spencer. In the current "Nation" I see that a book of yours has been published which I might buy


Toronto; My dear Docker. I wrote you a long letter, a copy of which I have here. It seems to me I didn't sent it for some reason.


Toronto; Dear Carlow. Thank you for your letter. I see from what you tell me your difficulty, where it comes to financing a set of illustrations


Toronto; Dear Father Murphy. Thank you for your letter. I shall be arriving on Sunday at 2:15, by the train which leaves her at 8:20


Toronto; Dear Mr. Macdonald. I have been moving about and have just got back here. Thank you very much for your letter,


Toronto; Dear Mr. Fairley. To what I owe this sudden [?], I do not know - after 2 1/2 years residence in this city:


Toronto; Dear Father Murphy. Your letter has just reached me, and I am delighted to learn that I am to come to Assumption College,


Toronto; Dear Mr. Macdonald. The enclosed cutting will graphically explain how it comes that my plans here had to be changed.


Ottawa; Dear Father Murphy. Am up here for a few days: will be touch in Toronto Saturday. This malaria of the North we call "influenza"


Toronto; Dear Mr. Macdonald. Your letter reached me earlier in the week, and this should arrive in Ottawa about the time you get back


Toronto; Dear Sir Kenneth Clark. A day or two ago I received your letter dated Feb. 15. The new proposal is, as you mention,


Toronto; Dear Mr. Downman. Owing to a few days absence this reply has been delayed. Thank you very much for your information. [On verso is AL[draft] to Rielle Thomason, March 27, 1943.]


Toronto; Dear Father Murphy. Thank you very much for your letter. I have waited a few days before answering it,


Toronto; My dear Kennington. Last week (March 23) at last a letter arrived from Clark. Here is the text of it.


Toronto; Dear Sir. My delay in getting in touch with you again has been caused by the difficultlies involved in carrying on a correspondence


Toronto; Received letter dated February fifteenth accept proposal picture for Ministry of Information Please have advance cabled


Toronto; Dear Father Murphy. I can come to Windsor as soon as is convenient to you - Thurs., Friday, or Sat.,


Toronto; Dear Sir Kenneth Clark. You will I expect have received my letter accepting your proposal and my cable of 10 days ago.


Toronto; Dear Malcolm MacDonald. Enclosed is a letter to Clark which you will see if you glance at it is to solicity speed.


Toronto; Dear MacDonald. A telegram has just gone off to you. This morning I saw the manager at the Dominican Bank,


Toronto; Bank which is Domincan Bank Rosedale Branch Toronto say they can proceed if you would address letter to them


Toronto; Dear Mr. McCurrie. You expressed a desire to see an article I had written, in which there was something about Alec Jackson.


Toronto; Dear Mrs. Hagarty. Father Murphy has written me about his visit to you, and described everything.


Toronto; Dear Macdonald. This is intended to reach you about the time you get back. [On same side of leaf AL[draft] to [?] Williams of the Office of the High Commission, May 1, 1943. With photostat of leaf.]


Toronto; Dear Father Murphy. The cold has cleared up - but what a winter! - My wife must have got some particularly aggresive bug [On same side of leaf AL[draft] to Hattie Hagarty, May 1, 1943. With photostate of leaf.]


Toronto; My dear Mr. Vanderploeg. My wife has a new kind of influenza - it is recurrent. It recurred two weeks ago & I got it -


Toronto; Dear Mr. Williams. Thank you very much for the cheque for 150 dollars which I have just received.


Toronto; Dear Mr. Williams. In your letter of May 4 you told me you had very kindly dispatched a further telegram to London,


Toronto; Dear Macdonald. Very many thanks for your activity in my behalf while in London and for contacting Clark.


Toronto; Dear Mr. Williams. Enclosed is the receipt for the cheque, for which many thanks. Thank you also for your offer


Toronto; Dear Mr. Williams. So far no money has arrived, but a letter from the Ministry of Information (a copy of which I enclose)


Toronto; My dear Jackson. I had to heave off that monday, so I could not contact you again, but when you get back I hope to see you.


Toronto; Dear Naomi. How are you? I can tell you nothing about myself, because [?] same to [?] of war


Toronto; Dear Father Murphy. With only thirty days left before I go into action at the summer school, my thoughts turn towards Mrs. Haggarty -


Toronto; Dear Sirs. Some time in March, I think it was, I wrote you. No reply has reached me, and of course you may never have received my letter,


Toronto; Dear Mr. Williams. I must apologize for not having sent you thiss receipt immediateely. I have been away for a day or so.


Toronto; My dear Rothenstein. Your letter of a few months ago saddened me somewhat. It was obvious taht you were not going to welcome me


Toronto; Dear Mr. Williams. Thank you for your letter of May 31st. I don't know what to think about this further contretemps..


Toronto; Dear Mr. Williams. I must apologize very much for my stupid mistake, with reference to what remained of the advance


Toronto; Dear Macdonald. By the time this reaches you the picture will be finished, or at latest on Monday.


Toronto; Dear Mr. Williams. On Wednesday last I wrote the High Commissioner, and in all probability a response to my letter is on the way,


Toronto; Dear Mr. Burgess. Tomorrow you will I hope you [will] be paying us a visit, but conditions have, with all doors open to promote


Toronto; Dear Mr. Burgess. I had supposed that once my picture was finished the High Commissioner's office would at least advance me


Windsor; Dear Macdonald. On Saturday last I sent you telegram with my temporary address then. The above is now my address,


Windsor; Dear Mr. Burgess. Well at last I sit down to write a few letters: except for my note to you and a couple of postcards


Windsor; Dear Sir. When I left Toronto 3 weeks ago I did not know what my address would be, [With AL[draft]to Tudor Hotel Manager, July 17, 1943 on same side. With photostat of leaf.]


Windsor; Dear Malcolm Macdonald. Yesterday I duly received the cheque for 664 dollars and enclosed is the receipt slip


Windsor; Dear Mrs. Sills. Thank you for your kind letter, which I should have answered some days ago,


Windsor; Dear Mr. McLuhan. Thank you for your letter and I include hope that when you are up here you will let me know


Windsor; Dear MacDonald. Thank you very much for your letter. I was most encouraged by your revistos regarding my plan for a book


Windsor; Dear Sir. My wife & myself have this apartment only for the summer. We are looking for an apartment for approximately 12 months.


Windsor; Dear MacDonald. Thank you for your very interesting letter. - I will slip in something about Jaquin's gifts as an illustrator


Windsor; Dear MacDonald. Thank you very much for your very interesting letter. I will follow out your suggestions, and slip in about "lepers raquette"


Windsor; Dear Giovanelli. Both I & my wife are delighted at the idea of paying a visit to St. Louis, and most awfully grateful


Windsor; My dear Mr. Beatie. Your letter has just reached me, forwarded from Toronto.


Windsor; My dear Mr. Vanderploeg. The enclosed letter to Mr. Beatie speaks for itself and answers


Windsor; Dear Giovanelli.Your letter just arrived, and it sounds to me as if you were doing wonders


Windsor; Dear Giovanelli.Here is a rough draft for the beginning of lecture - just to give Nagel an idea.


Windsor; Dear Mr. Nagel. Yesterday I received a letter from Mr. Giovanelli, who told me he had had a talk with you,


Windsor; My dear Naomi. I am in Windsor (the Canadian suburb of Detroit) but as I do not know what my address will be


Windsor; Dear Sirs. I am very greatly concerned about my belongings in the flat,


Windsor; Dear Sirs. I am very greatly concerned about my belongings in the flat, [Typed copy of letter in foler 57.]


Windsor; My dear John. How are you getting on? I still remain, buried up to my chin,


Windsor; Dear Rothenstein. Well, the picture representing Canadian War Effort is finished.


Windsor; Dear Mr. Burgess. Just a line to tell you the summer school indeed Aug. 8, and before long


Windsor; Dear Madam. I must apologize very deeply for not returning the library book


Windsor; Dear Rothenstein. Well, the picture representing "Canada's War Effort" is finished. [Typed letter same as draft in folder 60.]


Windsor; My dear Docker. No answer reached me as to Mõv's health - but perhaps my letter asking


Windsor; Dear Giovanelli. Thank you for your account of your further visit to Mr. Nagel -


Windsor; Dear Mr. Nagel. Thank you for your letter and I should like very much to come


Windsor; Dear McLuhan. Last night about 9.30 a messenger from the college brought me your letter


Windsor; Dear McLuhan. Giovanelli writes me that you have obtained a copy of "The Village Streak".


Windsor; Dear Mr. Vanderploeg. Thank you for your letter of 17th. As to my stay in Windsor,


Windsor; Dear Mr. Jones. (I hope I have read your name correctly). Thank you for forwarding the letter [On verso is AL[draft] to Sidney H. Bowles, August 24, 1943. With photostat of Bowles letter.]


Windsor; Dear MacDonald. This is just to thank you for your letter and to tell you I received


Windsor; Dear Mr. Vanderploeg. That is excellent - if you get here next Thursday as you expect,


Windsor; Dear Mr. Vanderploeg. Fine - I shall expect a telephone call Thurs. or Friday . - [On same side of leaf AL[draft] to Dolores Sills, [August 31, 1943]. With photostat of the leaf.]


Windsor; Dear Barr. Would you like to give me a testimonial, as a suitable person to paint a portrait?


Windsor; Dear McLuhan. The portrait of the late Becker I would willingly take on:


Windsor; Dear Giovanelli. I answer tardily (owing to unusual intensity of work):


Windsor; Dear Sir. I saw your advertisement in today's "Star", and would be glad if you could give me


Windsor; Dear McLuhan. Just a word to acknowledge your letter & to say how glad I was to hear


Windsor; Dear Kennington. For some time I have been down here, in this Canadian suburb of Detroit.


Windsor; Dear McL. The enclosed very important document arrived today. Please keep letter


Windsor; Dear MacDonald. First let me very tardily acknowledge receipt of the Jackson article


Windsor; Dear MacDonald. I enclose a pamphlet published 1941, Toronto - which may interest you


Windsor; Dear Sirs. The enclosed cutting will give you an idea of the kind of coat I want -


Windsor; Dear MacDonald. Above is my new address. I am at the same time sending a notification


Windsor; Dear MacDonald. Thank you very much for writing to Mr. Cane - [On same side of leaf AL[draft] to Cyril Cane, [Oct.9, 1943]; on verso of leaf AL[draft to Thomas Cook & Son,, [Oct.9, 1943] and AL[draft] to Alfred Barr, Jr., [Oct.9, 1943]. With photostat of MacDonald and Cane drafts.]


St. Louis; Dear Mrs. Trowell. It was really too bad that we did not meet again and yet all the time


Windsor; Dear Mr. Valentiner. Here is the copy I promised you of my letter to Mr. Richardson. [On same side of leaf AL[draft] to Cyril Cane, Oct.15, 1943. With photostat.


Windsor; Dear Mr. Richardson. I have been reading your book and like it very much.


Windsor; Dear Giovanelli. I have had a terrific week or 10 days: - my first lecture was last week


Windsor; Dear McLuhan. First, let me thank you for your extreme kindness in sending me H. Ford.


Windsor; Dear Mr. Williams. The first of my Heywood Braun lectures was on Sunday, and for 10 days I have had to get ready for it


Windsor; Dear Professor Brett. Excuse the delay in answering your kind letter, but I have not been able to take my nose out of books


Windsor; Dear Mr. Burgess. Please forgive me for my silence. Our movement into new quarters was accompanied by difficulties


Windsor; My dear Giovanelli. Thank you for your letter and the enclosed money order towards the portrait of your wife


Windsor; ... Booklets, or folders, or cards for propaganda require much pondering and careful attention.


Windsor; my dear McLuhan. Thank you for all the great trouble you have taken: and it was indeed good news that you [?] successfully


Windsor; My dear McLuhan. So far I have been unable to think of any commission for your New York trip.


Windsor; My dear Dr. Muller. I much enjoyed our little talk and hoped that you would not forget your promise to write to me:


Windsor; Dear Mr. Williams. I must apologize for the long delay: but the expert confirmation I wished to obtain was not


Windsor; Dear Mrs. Sexton. Long ago I should have written to thank you for the delightful evening I passed with you


Windsor; Dear Sirs. Why you should think that you are privileged to write me a bullying and offensive letter I do not know:


Windsor; Dear Mr. Nagel. Thank you for your letter of Dec.20, which I am only now answering because of the Christmas recess.


Windsor; ... demand a modicum of understanding or at least not to be additionally harassed on account of what I have done


St. Louis; ... I shall be here in St. Louis for 2 or 3 weeks longer. By Sept 15 I should be able to travel West.


Windsor; Dear Mrs. Paterson. Thank you so much for your postcard - my side of it I mean. At least I know by the weather here


Windsor; ... capacity of lecture - promotion for the Windsor [?] Club, that way other members of your staff will come to recognize me,


Windsor; Dear McLuhan. Your letter of Jan.1st has just turned up and I am delighted to hear that the Wednesday Club has overcome Nagel's objections.


Windsor; My dear Mary C. Your letter was a welcome reminder of friends I have not seen for far too long.


Windsor; Dear Mr. Gurian. I have your letter of Dec. 30 and was most flattered and pleased that you should want a contribution from me


Windsor; Dear Giovanelli. Thee temptation to accept your incredibly generous offer to occupy your apartment while in St. Louis


Windsor; Dear McL. (Mack is not too matey but it is too generic. I have known so many "Macks" - it blurs the image.


Windsor; My dear Mr. Richardson. Yesterday I had not time to speak to you about the lecture-cheque, but the fact is that that amount would be particularly handy just now.


Windsor; Dear Dr. Gurian. I must have misread your earlier letter: I cannot of course write an article to be sent "on approval", [On same side AL[draft] to Herbert Marshall McLuhan. With photostat of leaf.]


Windsor; My dear Mr. Muller. Over Christmas & New York my wife & myself have experienced much distress,


Windsor; Dear Sirs. The purpose of this letter is to secure your permission that I work for considerably longer, say a period of six months,


Windsor; Dear Macdonald. You must excuse me for the delay in answering your letter, but I have to write this carefully


Windsor; Dear Mr. Valentiner. Thank you for the telegram. The people at Assumption have just informed me that the cheque was actually


Windsor; Dear Miss Hettage. I have no slides, but if you had a few of "abstractist" canvases I could make use of them.


Windsor; My dear Mrs. Shaw. Thank you for your letter and I should like very much to address the meeting


Windsor; My dear Giovanelli. At present I am engaged upon the problems connected with moving


Windsor; My dear Miss Culbertson. Thank you for your invitation to address the Detroit Library Staff Association. [With photostat.]


Windsor; My dear Miss Cruise. Enclosed is the cheque for your father, with a little note [On verso of leaf AL[draft] to Mr. Cruise.]


Windsor; My dear Miss Culbertson. March 7, 10 A. M. will do excellently. At last to be talking to people


Windsor; My dear McL. We have been racking our brains as to how to meet this new situation.


[St. Louis] My dear Mr. Nagel. Thank you very much for the cheque, received yesterday,


St. Louis; My dear Miss Cruise. Getting off was a nightmare of hustle & I forgot to send you the keys.


St. Louis; My dear Father Murphy. Constantly since my arrival here I have been on the point of writing you


Windsor; Dear Mrs. Shaw. It has occurred to me that it would be a good thing to have a folder,


Windsor; Dear Spencer. I am getting a folder printed, in connection with my lectures. [On verso are 4 AL[draft] to Charles Nagel, Jr., Mrs. Knight, W. R. Valentiner and J. Stanley Murphy. With photostat of recto side of leaf.]


St. Louis; My dear Pauline. Enclosed money order for five dollars. Since arriving have been immersed in organizing


St. Louis; Dear Dr. Parker. Thank you for the cheque for 500 dollars, duly received by me.


St. Louis; My dear Father Murphy. Many tasks have intervened since I got back here, to delay me writing,


St. Louis; My Father Murphy. Thank you for your letter which I hasten to answer: (it arrived Sunday,


St. Louis; My dear Eliot. Thank you for your letter, forwarded me here, where I am engaged in some portrait-work.


St. Louis; Dear Mrs. Graham. We have been away for the week-end or I should have acknowledged your kind letter


St. Louis; Dear MacDonald. Your letter only reached me a short while ago: I have never given the Assumption College


St. Louis; My dear Mrs. Gellhorn. We are back, and thank you for being so kind as to personal deliver your note


St. Louis; Dear Mr. Macdonald. Your last letter reached me, forwarded from Assumption,


St. Louis; My dear Pauline. Was sorry not to see you. When do you go off to your holidays?


St. Louis; Dear Auden. As you know I expect I have been over here some time. What I am anxious to get at this moment is a job


St. Louis; Dear Professor Bredbold. You will remember we met near Detroit - to hear about Venus & Adonis. I am down here in St. Louis


St. Louis; Dear Giovanelli. Your letter to hand. You and I know perfectly well why my wife & self left your apartment


St. Louis; Dear McLuhan. Reflecting upon our conversation morning at my studio, which clarified my rather happy knowledge


St. Louis; Dear McLuhan. I am now put in the position of forcing upon you an arrangement which you obviously do not desire


St. Louis; Dear Mr. Macdonald. Your letter informing me of the despatch of our correspondence to London duly reached me.


St. Louis; Dear Mrs. Sandri. McLuhan has shown me in your letter, in which you so kindly explore the possibilities of a post in a university


St. Louis; My dear Mrs. Stix. I am delighted to learn that I am to paint the portrait - to start with of yourself.


St. Louis; Dear Dr. Taylor. I have been so fortunate as to obtain new and important work here in St. Louis.


St. Louis; Dear Mrs. Sandri. It was extraordinarily kind of you to make the contacts you have on my behalf,


St. Louis; Dear Father Murphy. Mea culpa! - but will you allow me to skip Thursday 6th (as I saw in the program of work you sent


St. Louis; Dear Father Murphy. We shall be arriving Detroit as before around 10.30 on Monday 17 July


Windsor; Dear Mr. Burgess. Your letter arrived duly and gave me great pleasure. I have delayed my answer until I had a weekend


Windsor; My dear Mrs. Cori. Thank you for your letter. It will be an exciting mement when I first gaze at the colour block


Windsor; My dear Mr. Paterson. First of all please thank your wife for her postcard, with the message telling me of the receipt


St. Louis; My dear Father Murphy. Thank you for your letter. We were sorry not to see you on the 25th but at the end of the week


Windsor; My dear Mrs. Cori. Your life in the Rockies sounded very pleasant. Finding Old Vienna fossilized in those savage regions -


Windsor; Dear Mrs. Stix. We were leaving today but are delaying our departure until Sunday morning (Wabash) [On same leaf, same side is AL[draft] to Mrs. A. Swinton Paterson and AL[draft] to Lee Hildebrand, both same date.]


St. Louis; Dear Mr. Paterson. We have withdrawn to our base at above address, which is much cheaper & more comfortable.


St. Louis; Dear Sirs. To the enclosed forms I need add nothing I think. Mrs. Ernest Stix is the wife of the president


St. Louis; My dear Pauline. Excuse this letter so long after yours: but among other things a temporary


St. Louis; Dear Mr. Macdonald. Thank you for your letter and I am very obliged to you for putting me on your free list.


St. Louis; Dear Mr. Robey. Your method of addressing me - namely "Mr. D. B. Wyndham Lewis" - I find gratuitously offensive.


St. Louis; Dear Mr. Robey. I am not, as you are aware, Mr. Dominic Bevan Wyndham Lewis: I shall work a little more


St. Louis; Dear Sir. I am in receipt of your note, requesting me to vacate this room on the 25th of this month.


St. Louis; My dear Mr. Martin. Thank you for your letter: I should like to do a portrait of your wife, you may be sure,


St. Louis; Dear Mrs. Stix. Regarding our last talk on telephone, there is something I perhaps should have said at the time.


St. Louis; Dear Mr. Taylor. Your secretary told me this morning on the telephone , as she did yesterday, that you were teaching


St. Louis; Dear Barr. Enclosed colour-plate of my portrait of Dr. Joseph Erlanger, who has just received the Nobel Prize 1944 award


St. Louis; Dear Mr. Paterson. Enclosed a money-order for fifty dollars: I hope you won't mind if I send you only this today


St. Louis; Dear Sweeney. I was pleased to hear that you were in the same place, even if other people are not in the same place.


St. Louis; Dear Sir. This is to acknowledge the receipt of your note. It was quite unnecessary if you had other plans for my room, [On verso is AL[draft] to E. G. Fenner, Nov.13, 1944.]


St. Louis; Dear Mrs. Cori. My "Mrs. Stix" is really a good one, and I am very anxious not to spoil the effect by showing it prematurely.


St. Louis; Dear Madam. Mrs. Giovanalli lent me a book, named "The Lion & the Fox," which she had taken out of the college library.


St. Louis; Dear McLeish [sic]. Thank you for your note. - As to my movements, I have a woman & a child to finish painting here


St. Louis; My dear Sweeney. It was a great pleasure having a word from you. As to a swing eastward: it is my intention to effect that


St. Louis; Dear Madconald. First let me apolgize for the delay in answering your letter. I have literally not had to spare energy


St. Louis; Dear MacLeish. My work will be over here in a few days. Will you be in Washington on Wednesday or Thursday next week?


St. Louis; Dear Mr. Paterson. As I have just been paid for my large portrait, I hasten to send you what remains of my debt


St. Louis; Dear Mrs. Cori. Tomorrow (Tuesday) morning I have to go to Washington & back. Shall be away 3 days or so. [On same side of left AL[draft] to Lee Hildbrand, Nov.4, 1944.]


St. Louis; Dear Sir. Your letter approving my request for an extension of my stay here until Dec.10 duly arrived. [On same side of leaf AL[draft] to Paul Martin, [Dec.4, 1944] With photostat of sme.]


St. Louis; Dear Malcolm Macdonald. Please forgive me for my delaying in answering your letter. We leave here in 4 days time


Windsor; Dear Sir. Enclosed is the last communication I received from you, granting an extension of my stay in the U.S. A. up to Dec.10, 1944


Windsor; Dear MacLeish. Have you weathered the grotesque storm I read about in the press? I hope so. Here is a safe permanent address:


Windsor; ... but about this: - Do you think that it would be any use showing this letter to Cleanth Brooks? You have my permission,


[London?] Dear Macdonald. Since my return I have plunged into labours which have just terminated, and it has been impossible for me


Windsor; Dear Mr. Martin. Today I worked out several poses, and at your wife's suggestion tried out the idea with beige suit.


[London?] My Lord. I am the writer and painter, and, as it happens, your tenant at the above studio. Just before the war I went to America,


Windsor; Dear Mr. Hildebrand. Our 3 pieces of heavy luggage have so far not arrived in Detroit, it being 2 week's last Saturday


[London]; Dear Sir. I must apologize for the delay in answering your communication of Dec.14, but I thought I had sent it to my lawyer


[Windsor]; Dear Professor Bredvold. Thank you very much for your letter, and March 7th would perhaps be the best date for me.


Windsor; My dear Mrs. Cori. Owing to something that retarded the development of what we know as Hildebrand, [On verso AL[draft] to Allen Tate, Jan.29, 1945. With 2 photostats of each side of leaf.]


Ottowa; Dear Richardson. Stopping in above hotel for a week anyway. After that may bo to Hull.


Windsor; Dear McLuhan. You have made it impossible for me to give my lecture which had nothing to do with you [Two versions of letter.]


Windsor; Dear Mr. McLuhan. In a small community, where everybody knows everybody else, [Second version of letter in folder 10.


Windsor; Dear Father Murphy. I enclose a copy of letter Paulus & Mr. McLuhan since the matters


Windsor; Dear Mr. Paulus. I would be glad if you would let me know from what quarter you, or whoever,


Windsor; Dear Mr. Martin. The picture of your wife, under the difficult conditions that you know,


Windsor; Dear Mr. Martin. For the next few days I must be free to extricate myself from the muddle


Windsor; Dear Smith. Yesterday morning I received your letter (at the hotel0. Had to go to Grosse Pointe


Windsor; Dear Mr. Martin. On Sunday afternoon of Feb. 17th you visited me. I offered to accompany you to Detroit


Windsor; Dear Mr. Martin. I cannot allow you to make statements of that kind. You will hear from me,


Windsor; Dear Mr. Martin. I just have no time to answer you, nor have I had for the past ten days.


Windsor; My dear Eliot. Here is a reliable address, to which letters my be dispatched


Windsor; My dear John. What are you doing? Do any Y2 bombs visit Fordingbridge - they have real


Windsor; Dear Rothenstein. To my great regret I saw in a Canadian paper that your father was dead.


Windsor; Dear Mrs. Piper. In the article in one place & perhaps two (I cannot find my cartoon) [On verso AL[draft] to Meary James Thurairajah Tambimuttu, March 27, 1945.]


Windsor; Dear Mr. Tate. The article went off yesterday, and I hope will reach you tomorrow Friday.


Windsor; Dear Giovanelli. It was the painting, not the drawing, I did for you & you paid for.


Windsor; Dear Mr. Tate. Thank you for your letter and cheque. It gave me great pleasure


Ottawa; Dear Mr. Tate. As you will see, I have moved up here to Ottawa. The uprooting process


Ottawa; Dear Richarson. The receipt of your letter was a most unexpected blow. I have now I think,


Ottawa; Dear Tate. (Yes let us unmister ourselves!) Your letter to hand and I should like to do something


Ottawa; My dear John. Your letter cheered me up - it is excellent to be reminded that there is,


Ottawa; Dear Tate. At Customs today they informed me I had to pay just on 2 dollars


Ottawa; Dear Tate. What fun it would be if I were in Servance! I was delighted at your suggestion,


Ottawa; Dear Mr. Brockington. The portrait idea is not feasible, I fear, in these regions.


London; Dear Docker. Here is the Times Literary Supplement Special number, containing,


London; Thank you for telegram which was a great shock. I had no idea poor Moy's condition was so critical.


London; Dear Mov. Since my visit much has happened but finally I'm back where I was before,


London; My dear Docker. I can't say much to you, you know that. Suddenly to learn of Mov's death


London; My dear Tate. Thank god I am back here at last and at work. First serving much for 6 years.


London; Dear Gwynn-Jones. Thank you for your letter. As to portrait of Ezra Pound, for the C.E.M.A. show


London; Dear Eliot. This place is now habitable. How about coming up some evening soon.


London; My dearear Gwynne-Jones. The post office inform me that, owing to shortage of labour, they are unable


London; Dear Sirs. In answer to your request for payment of an account to J. John Bros. I am enclosing


London; Dear Naomi. It was very pleasant to hear of your multifarious activities and feel oneself not too far away:


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. Enclosed is copy of note re.rates. - This flat was rented me bby Vincent Harley, Estate Agents,


London; Dear Sir. This matter is in the hands of my lawyer, [Bend?], Longstaffe, and Fenwick. 15 Berners St. W.


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. "The Council of the Royal Borough of Kensington demand payment" etc. This appears to be it.


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. The Council of the Royal Borough of Kensigton have not waited for your reply to their letter,


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. My wife has found the agreement with Mr. Philip Thompson. Two facts of importance are thereby established.


London; Dear Eliot. What of that earnings we were going to spend together? I suggest some evening next week, say Wednesday -


London; Dear Dr. McPhersosn. There are all the signs of a frightful and prolonged fog, so the ends of health might be defeated


London; My dear John. It is good to hear that you are up here at last & within reach. But so far I have not succeeded in reaching you


London; Dear Mr. Toynbee. Thank you for your letter. On Monday I am coming down to Nicholson and Watson in the afternoon.


London; My dear Richardson. Here I am, back and hard at work again. Long ago I should have written you but have been putting off


London; Dear Tate. This is to convey to you all ceasonable wishes for the New York. I have been postponing letters to America


London; Dear Blaikley. I have been in the coutnry and on my return find your very kind offer of pre-first-war brushes awaiting me.


London; Dear Tambimuttu. Before Easter your secretary wrote me that a new contract would b3e forwarded me at the beginning of the following week.


London; ... The point of all this is not that I shall have had to wait a long time to see my book in print. Many writers have reason to complain of that.


London; Dear Mr. Swann. Here is the last of the mss. It's delivery has been greatly delayed by illness (not my own).


London; Dear Mr. Swann. A single copy of proofs arrived a short while ago. I don't know if this was the complimentary copy:


London; Dear Tambi. I cannot, I am afraid, hang on until the day after tomorrow. Please represent to whoever it is deals with these things


London; My dear Tambi. As to book : I write it night & day. I do not go out at all, and recently I have worked till 11.30 p.m.


London; Dear Macdonald. It is with the greatest reluctance I break in upon your brief holiday with what I laughingly call business,


London; Dear Macdonald. It is with the greatest reluctance I break in upon your brief holiday with what I laughingly call business, [variation of letter in folder 62]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. In reply to your note, just to hand. (I) On Monday I hand in the concluding chapters of my book about America,


London; Tambi. A number of notes I had mislaid were suddenly discovered. It seemed to me worth while to incorporate those


London; Dear Marie Moore! Your letter gave me a big pang. What charming days those were compared with these, as you say.


London; Dear Tambi. I have now finished correcting proofs. The proofs are packed with mistakes -wrong letters (a d for K etc.)


London; My dear Grigson. I was glad to hear from you and of course would be delighted to see you. Campbell in his blurred and


London; Dear Tambimuttu. I was surprised today that you were not present but remained upstairs when Mrs. Roberts acquainted me


London; Dear Eliot. I return the cheque which happily was not needed - none the less grateful for the kind offer. What has happened


London; My dear Van der Kruik. It was with the greatest relief and pleasure that I received your letter, and learnt of your safety


London; My dear Tate. For five months I have been struggling to get a book finished in time so that it should get published


London; Dear Mrs. Piper. Thank you for your letter & the cheque for 50 [pounds]. I am without a bank not for long I hope;


London; Dear Mr. Furlong. I am sorry to hear you have so much difficulty about cost. By all means put me down for some sum [On same side of leaf is AL[draft] to [Unknown], March 30, 1946. With photostat of both.]


London;Dear Tambimuttu. Before Easter your secretary wrote me that a new contract would be forwarded me at the beginning [Same TLS in folder 56.]


London; Dear Mr. Swann. At last the remainder of the galleys have arrived. With them was a note from Mrs. Scott asking for a blurb.


London; Dear Tambimuttu. I don't know if you got a letter I wrote you about 2 weeks ago. In it I asked you to have that item altered [On verso AL[draft] to Ernest Blaikley, Apr.9, 1946.]


London; Dear Mrs. Piper. When is Pavilion to appear? Since, as you may have remarked, I am accorded a minimum of advertisement


London; Dear Tambimuttu. I was very sorry to learn that the difficulties encompassing P. L. have so increased as to prevent you attending


London; Dear Mrs. Piper. Thank you for your letter, with approximate date of publication of Pavilion. - I am doing new work but at present [On verso AL[draft] to Ernest Blaikley, Apr.22, 1946 and AL[draft] to Dr. Weinsberg, Apr.22, 1946. With photostat cut in two of verso letters.]


London; Dear Sirs. Mr. Duncan Macdonald, of the Reid Lefevre Galleries, Bond Street, has given me your address. [On verso is AL[draft] to War Artists Advisory Committee, April 27, 1946. With photostat of verso.]


London; My dear Tom. Thank you for your note & the enclosed spistle from Ezra. I will of course write to him at once.


London; My dear Tom. Thank you for your note & the enclosed spistle from Ezra. I will of course write to him at once. [Draft of letter in folder 82, with AL[draft] to Nigel Tagye, April 29, 1946 on same side. With photostat of leaf.]


London; Dear Rothenstein, Thank you for your note, and I have been wondering too how you were getting on, and especially had wished to see that article


London; Dear Sirs. Thank you for the 4 brushes. If you can send me some moree as and when you get them I shall be greatly obliged: [On verso AL[draft] to Ernest Blaiklley, May 11, 1946. With photostat of verso.]


London; Dear Rothenstein. Thank you for your note, and I have been wondering how you were getting on, and especially had wished to see that article [Draft of letter in folder 84.]


London; Dear Tambimuttu. Your note susrprised and rather startled me. I did not know the end was so near. - But let me once more


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. I enclose a money order (33.15.0[pounds]) for the rent, which is due this week. I shall be telephoning you


London; My dear old Ezra. How are you, and what are you doing with yourself. T. S. Eliot sent along your letter and I was rejoiced


London; Dear Dr. Weinberg. I enclose 25.4.0 [pounds], with many apologies for delay. A period of great difficulty, now happily at an end,


London; Dear Macdonald. Should you go to Switzerland - why not postpone trip for one week & get stronger?


London; Dear Tambimuttu. My meeting with you in the street the other day was productive - as is most dealings with you -


London; Dear Agee. A letter (a copy of which I enclose) has just reached me from the "Time" office in London. John, in his kind,


London; Dear Naomi. It is anumber of months since I have seen your face, except in paint that is in the portrait of your fair self, [With photostate of draft, recto.]


London; Dear Tate. Many thanks for your note. The proofs of my article arrived and have been air-mailed back. So at last that piece


London; Dear Mr. Williams. Your letter of May 30 reached me only yesterday, as I have been moving about. It gave me great pleasure


London; Dear Mr. Roberts. It is quite impossible to hold any sensible communication with your colleague Tambimuttu: so I must turn to you.


London; Dear Mr. Wiedenfeld. After my talk with you on the telephone I told one or two people that an article of music was appearing


London; Dear Mrs. Piper. You said Pavilion was appearing in September.So far, however no proofs of my article have turned up. [With AL[draft] Edgar P. Richardson, Aug.14, 1946 on same side and AL[draft] to Allen Tate, Aug.14, 1946 on verso of leaf.]


London; Dear Mrs. Piper. You said Pavilion was appearing in September. ... [Same as draft letter in folder 10 but without other two letters.]


London;

Dear Richardson. Just a hasty note to enquire what has happened to my painting - now so long overdue. Thank you for your letter and for the catalogue


London; Dear Giovanelli. Things grew ever more complicated in America and the effort to get back here absorbed all my energies.


London; Dear Macdonald. I was delighted to hear that your stay in Switzerland had done you good. In future I hope you will be very careful [With AL[draft] to Dr. Ian McPherson, Aug.27, 1946, on same side and AL[draft] to Felix Giovanelli, Aug.27, 1946 on verso. Also photostate of rector of leaf.]


London; Dear Tambimuttu. I have received your letter, and I will answer it fully, immediately I receive your answer to the question. [With AL[draft to Myfancwy Piper, Aug.27, 1946 and AL[draft] to Dwight MacDonald, Aug.27, 1946 on same side and AL[draft] to Allen Tate, Aug.27, 1946 on verso.]


London; Dear Mr. Macdonald. While I was in America I had meant to come to New York again, and should have made a point of seeing you.


London; My dear Tate. The page-proofs of my American book left by registered mail at same time as my letter to you.


London; Dear Tambimuttu. You send me a typical reply to my request for a straightforward answer to my question, namely, [On verso AL[draft] to Dr. Ian McPherson, Sept.4, 1946 and AL[draft] to Mervyn Lewis, Sept.4, 1946.]


London; Dear Tambimuttu. You send me a typical reply to my request for a straightforward answer to my question, namely, [Typed version of draft in folder 18.]


London; Dear Sirs. My book "The Art of Being Ruled," is no longer [procurate?] I understand. According to our contract,


London; Dear Flower. Here is the formal note, then. My two books, "The Revenge for Love," and "Men Without Art," you tell me are out of print.


London; Dear Flower. Here is the formal note, then. My two books, "The Revenge for Love," and "Men Without Art," you tell me are out of print. [Signed letter as in folder 21.]


London; My dear Tate. The proofs sall be turning up in New York quite soon now. Several things have occurred to me recently [On verso AL[draft] to Meary James Thurairajah Tambimuttu, Sept.15, 1946.]


London; My dear Tate. The proofs sall be turning up in New York quite soon now. Several things have occurred to me recently [Typed version of letter in folder 23.]


London; My dear John. Avoiding the crowd on Tursday, I went to see your sisters things on Friday. I did not know her work [With photostat.]


London; Dear Giovanelli. The fever of my six years stay in America is abeting; I am now getting a little straight. So how about this picture [With AL[draft] to Israel Citkowitz, Sept.24, 1946 on same side and AL[draft] to Ezra Pound, Sept.24, 1946 on verso.]


London; My dear Citkowitz. I wonder if the passing of six years finds you in the same place? My movements after leaving N.Y. were erratic


London; Dear Giovanelli. The fever of my six years stay in America is abeting; I am now getting a little straight. So how about this picture [Typed version of draft in folder 26.]


London; My dear John. You may mot have got my other note before leaving Fordingbridge. Your daughter tells me you are off next Monday,


London; Dear Pound. Unless I answer letters quickly, I am apt to lose them, and I have lost Dorothy's. What is her address?


London; My dear Tange. Your postcard has just arrived. It is tremendously kind of you to send me brushes. My stock is getting lower


London; My dear Tate. Your letter reached me last night. Its contents pleased me very much: for that Holt would like to publish a book of mine


London; My dear Tate. Your letter reached me last night. Its contents pleased me very much: for that Holt would like to publish a book of mine [Another typed copy of letter in folder 32.]


London; Dear John. Thank you for your letter. I am extremely glad the outline of my plans meet with your approval. I will write you again


London; Dear Flower. How about "Men Without Art"? Sincerely,


London; My dear John. So you are only just off - instead of -- as I first thought upon receiving your letter - prematurely back.


London; Dear Flower. I have your letter. I must say I think it is exceedingly unfair, as you most obviously take no interest in the book


London; Dear Flower. I have your letter. I must say I think it is exceedingly unfair, as you most obviously take no interest in the book [Typed signed version of same letter in folder 37.]


London; My dear John.Your card, announcing your move into the Mas, just arrived. "Le Robinson" has an inviting look,


London; Dear Flower. Thank you for waiving the three months interval, so that I can arrange at once for the publication of "Men Without Art".


London; Dear John. Very many thanks for the photographs. Edwin & Dylan Thomas make excellent pair. The menu of the "Robinson",


London; Dear Grigson. Your broadcast last night was first-class propaganda for me, for which I am most grateful. [With photostat of shorter version (appears to be first one).]


London; Dear Sirs. Is mr. Cyrus Brooks with you now or not? Faithfully, [With AL[draft] to Mervyn Lewis, Nov.13, 1946, on same side, AL[draft] to Allen Tate, Nov.13, 1946 on both sides plus second leaf, and AL[draft to Allan Gwynne-Jones, Nov.13, 1946 on verso. Also photostat of leaf recto.]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. I have had a violent visitation of the flu-cold. Am trying to get my papers in order (for which I have no time [Typed version of letter to Lewis in folder 43.]


London; Dear Tate. The writing of book no. 2 has been held up by journalism, broadcasting, and now by flu. Shall send you nothing [Typed version of letter to Tate in folder 43.]


London; Dear Grigson. Here is the de Tocqueville article. It is a copy of the Sewanee article, except that I was obliged,


London; Dear Docker. After my nine days of flu I went out in the moring to but a newspaper, and, in [cr?..] this filthy bottleneck


London; Dear Docker. Thank you immensely for the cheque, which at this juncture makes all the difference. One just has to sit


London; Dear Mr. Humphreys. Thank you for your letter and I shall like very much to speak in your series "Liberty and the Individual"?


London; Dear John. My compliments - your letter to the Times about the massacre of the pictures was timely, as such things fizzle out


London; Dear Grigson. Thank you foryour note. As the Oxford Press are to publish a "Democracy in American" a few sentences would have to be altered,


London; Dear Tate. It was very kind of you to airmail the mss. of "America and Cosmic Man." Did you I wonder see in a New York literary magazine


London; Dear Grigson. Very anxious to have more facts about the attacks on you by Sitwells. In the last instance it is also an attack on me.


London; Dear John. I am moving round again now, thank goodness. Are you recovered and when will you be up in town? [On verso AL[draft] to Geoffrey Grigson, about Dec.15, 1946. With photostat of recto.]


[n.p.] Dear Macdonald. As it seems that you will be resting at home between now and your departure on Saturday, I must take desperate measures


London; Dear Gaunt. It was very nice to hear from you again. My movements have been uncertain for a week or two, which is why


London; Dear Giovanelli. I am trying to do a hundred things at once - finish a long book, journalism, broadcsting, to [?] with lawyers [Also on first page is a crossed-out letter to William Gaunt. Plus photostat of recto of first page.]


London; Dear Mr. Humphreys. There seems to be a muddle as to who is responsible for payment of fee for broadcast -


London; Dear Mr. Macdonald. It is extremely kind of you to send me copies of Politics. A thing of Agees was terribly good I thought -


London; It is extremely kind of you to send me copies of Politics. [Typed fragment of letter in folder 58.]


London; Dear Dorothy. Your letter vanished (which has just turned up, without apology) among the great mass of papers that at the time filled my studio


London; Dear Mr. Mitchell. As to the 2 letters from Roberts and Tambimutu. As was to be expected, they merely say that the fault is mine.


London; Dear Miss Kallin. Thank you for your letter, and I should like to do a crisis talk. I should be delighted to have lunch with you


London; Dear Ayrton. I should have sent you this note sooner but for the demoralization which with me always accompanies "flu".


London; Dear Gio. Your letter with its magnificent proposal has just arrived. This most kind and generous impulse of yours will certainly help us


London; Dear Giovanelli. Excuse the long delay in answering. The winter here is a whole-time job. All the pipes are on the outside of the houses:


London; My dear Gwynne Jones. You have my permission of course to use the Eliot portrait and the portrait of Miss Sitwell for your book.


London; Dear Avrion. Maomi, your mama, thought you would care to come and show me what a big boy you had grown into, [On verso AL[draft] to Augustus John, April, 1947. With photostat of recto.]


London; Dear Van der Kruig[sic]. The other day I received a visit from Rohrmann who gave me rather alarming news about you.


London; Dear Maomi. An influenza visitation leaves me a little jaded - before that I was to the exclusion of all else finishing a book,


London; Dear Dorothy. At last I have discovered your address. The masses of papers in this studio have a way of engulfing epistles


London; Dear Ezra. I often think about you: and I have been writing about you too. At least a year must elapse however before the book


[n.p.] Mr Lewis (our client?) wishes to remind you that not once or twice, but repeatedly, he wrote you upon various matters [Written by Lewis for his lawyers to send.]


London; Dear Mr. Soby. Geoffrey Grigson sent me along your letter of Feb. 24. I should have acted sooner but have been moving about.


London; My dear Tate. In a few days (probably 5 or 6) I shall be sending you the new book. It was handed in here two days ago,


London; Dear Sir. I am in receipt of your printed note inquiring what was due for rates on March 31 last. [Also on recto AL[draft] to Katherine Webb, April 27, 1947; on verso and second leaf AL[draft] to Allan Gwynne-Jones, April 27, 1947. With photostat of recto leaf of letters to Lewis and Webb.]


London; Dear Mrs. Webb. There is a misunderstanding somewhere! Let us identify it before passing on to the business in hand. [Pages 3-4 lacking and anything after 5.]


London; Dear Mr. Mitchell. Enclosed is the rough draught of the letter to Nicholas Moore. I am awfully sorry to have to bother you [With AL[draft] to Moore.]


London; Dear Mrs. Webb. It would be better for the momeent I think to confine ourselves to the main thing, namely the novel.


London; Dear Docker. Only yesterday I handed in my mss., 7 months late. This does not mean that I have been lying down on the job.


London; Dear Heath. I thought I had better get a synopsis for you that would make clear my intention.


London; Dear Knight. Here is my address. If anything was bringing you to London, I hope you would drop me a line [Also on verso AL[draft] to George Yeats, June 28, 1947, and AL[draft] to Sir Kenneth Clark, June 28, 1947.]


London; Dear Mr. Vint. It was bad luck - or bad management, rather, for I should have notified you of my visit - not finding you in


London; My dear Tate. Thank you for your air-mail note: when I learnt that you were going away for 3 weeks on July 4


London; Dear Sirs. In the absence of Mr. Wyndham Lewis I am answering your request for further particulars. First the name is Wyndham Lewis,


London; Dear Mr. Howell. By descent I am Welsh but I suppose that is men enough for the purpose. This is something new that I want to show


London; Dear Mr. Paige. I have been trying to get a holiday, hence the delay in answering. - I should be very glad to write something


London; Dear Dorothy. A word to thank you for the information and to say with what melancholy feelings I visualise your existence in Washington


London; Dear Tate. The manner you have found of communicating to me the news of the refusal of my book by your firm


London; Dear Tate. The manner you have found of communicating to me the news of the refusal of my book by your firm [Draft of letter in folder 88.]


London; Dear Mr. Kahma. First let me thank you for the exceptionally welcome and unexpected arrival of a parcel of food.


London; Dear Mr. Kahma. This is just a line or two (I shall be writing more fully in a few days) to forbid you to send my expensive food parcels


London; Dear Mr. Paige. Thank you for your note. I will do an article of the kind you suggest: and if you are in charge of the number


London; My dear Dorothy. Mr. Moore the lawyer came to see me on Tuesday of this week and we had a long talk. I am now in possession of the facts


London; Dear Mr. Soby. Thank you for your letter - which I did not receive at once as I have been moving about. --


London; Sir. In an article entitled "Satire in the Twenties", in your issue of Sept. 13, I find the following, where the reviewer is about to speak of my novel "Tarr":


London; Dear Mr. Simpson. Thank you for your letter. You are for me a mysterious stranger - all I know is that you must have obtained my address


London; Dear Honeyman. I was very please[sic] to hear from the Lacaster Dalleries that my pastel drawing, 'Nigger Heaven', [With AL[draft] to Naomi Mitchison. Plus photostat.]


London; Dear Dorothy. Thank you for your letter and enclosure. They should, I think, create a post for me, of general cultural expert!


London; Dear Kahma. First I must as usual speak of food and express my gratitude! The Danish parcel has arrived:


London; DearAckerley. Your note gave me the greatest pleasure. And I needed something pleasant,


London; Dear Kahma. First, your long and most interesting letter. It was not my idea that you should try to do anything


London; Dear Dorothy. The C. A. R. E. parcel has arrived and I am profoundly grateful.


London; Dear Kahma. Just a line to let you know that today has been marked by two Canadian events:


London; Dear Stone. Six years having passed, it is highly improbable that you are in the same place. [On same side of leaf AL[draft] & TL[copy on another leaf] to James Johnson Sweeney, Nov.29, 1947; on verso AL[draft] to William Gaunt, Nov. 29, 1947. With photostats of recto and verso of draft leaf.]


London; My dear Giovanelli. You and Margaret did wonderfully well on your visit to Gimpels,


London; Dear Kahma.Just a line to ask how you are, and announce the safe arrival of no less than three parcels


London; Dear Mr. Soby. Excuse this seemingly dilatory answer but such energy as is left when absorbed in writing


London; Dear Hart-Davis.Here is the mss. of which I spoke. I shall after all write up to seventy-five thousand words.


London; Dear Kahma. Thank you for your long letter and now this further one about the baths in Finland.


London; Dear Docker. This is a difficult and gloomy letter to write and last night when I rang you


London; Dear Stone. As I do not expect anything American to stay put, it was with surprise -


London; My dear Docker. I am most deeply grateful. It was distressing to have to turn to you again


London; Dear Giovanelli. You and Margaret have again laid me under a deep obligation


London; Dear Kahma. A answer at least, disgracefully late, really no more than a breathless note.


London; Dear Sirs. My inquiries at the office had tended to show that nothing much need be expected


London; Dear Mr. Mitchell. The desease[sic] from which most London houses suffer has afflicted this one


London; Sir. In his letter Mr. Megroz should surely have gone on to enquire why people persist


London; Dear Gaunt. I do not like postponing our meeting, as I have been looking foward to seeing you


[London]; Paige in great difficulties in Rapallo quite without money. Suggest you instruct Pollinger


London; Dear Ezra. Your letter tortuous comme d'habitude, but a few clear spots.


London; Dear E. P. I perceive I have offended - though what in my article provoked retaliatory


London; Dear Docker. I know you hate American : I am aware that "Cosmic Man" is not your cup of tea.


London; Dear Ezra. Good luck in the new year, is my tardy salute. Christmas holiday etc. is with me a lump of knots


London; Dear Docker. Alas, I have not been able to extract an additional 38 [pounds] from my new dealer


London; Dear Kahma. This letter is a more slender outrider, the letter I owe you and which is now long overdue will come


London; Dear Kahma. A second outrider. - Thanks for the cuttings. The uses to which you propose


London; My dear Docker. To state the matter starkly and at once, I have until Saturday - 4 days -


London; Dear Giovanelli. The great parcel has at last arrived and it is first rate: I am enormously grateful


London; My dear Stone. From Denmark - delayed no doubt by the Christmas congestion -


London; My dear Omar. Thank you for your letter, which has just turned up, and your New Years Wishes.


London; My dear Read. I have not I fear your excuse of many absences abroad for a long silence


London; My dear Read. I have not I fear your excuse of many absences abroad for a long silence [Typed version of letter in folder 32.]


London; Dear Gaunt. Danger of an ice raze I think recedes: the danger seems to be rather of a catastrophe of another kind - a flood.


London; Sir. If I exhibit a painting or a drawing anywhere, your critic promptly delivers himself


London; Dear Kahma. Still I am immersed in the legal business. Your letter with photographs arrived & I extract myself to say this.


London; Dear Giovanelli. By this time a longish missive should have reached you, containing the news of the arrival of parcel:


London; Dear Pryce-Jones. Your present communications (I have before me your letter of Feb. 10) contains your impertinance


London; Dear Pryce-Jones. The galleys arrived this morning. I am sure your switches into the third person are most deft.


London; Dear Read. Not hearing from you, I repaired to the Academy Hall, hoping I might find you there, I was however shown,


London; Dear Mr. Mitchell. Thank you for your note, in which you announce the conclusion of the Nicholson and Watson Poetry - London,


London; Dear Pryce-Jones. before last night the galleys you sent me had remained unread. - To push your spiteful joke so far as to print


London; Sir. Your art critic as the little guy in the old mangrove swamp - asking the big art-men to show him all the big pictures


London; Dear Pryce-Jones. I will answer your letter, which arrived this morning at the week-end (in bed with cold).


London; My dear Gio. According to our standards it is long ago since we last were in contact. However, let your last letter be my point of departure.


London; Dear Kahma. It seems a very long time since last I wrote: you must have wondered what had happened.


London; Dear Ezra. Your letter and enclosure gave me great pleasure. At the moment I was unable to answer properly


London; Dear Dorothy. Thank you for your nice letter. Recent weeks have been passed by me in a nightmare of desperate activity.


London; Dear Gwynn Jones. You have so many addresses that I was in doubt as to which to select, upon receiving your letter with cheque


London; Dear Kahma. Answers and thanks to begin with. (I) A magnificent parcel arrived, with one of your most concentrated best,


London; Dear Mrs. Giovanelli. For some time, I have been up north doing certain work. During that time a grand parcel arrived


London; Dear Ezz. Since all my time has been fully occupied wwriting 3.000 works for your memorial number none remained for correspondence.


London; Dear Giovanelli. For some time I have been up north, working. During this absence a Gimpel parcel arrived -


London; Dear Stone. Until this week-end I have been up north on a job. While I was away a superb C.A.R.E. parcel arrived.


London; Dear Kahma. Letter dated March 24 arrived yesterday (Wednesday). Today a parcel arrived, dispatched Feb. 27th.


London; Dear Mr. Feast. Your letter of April 3rd has just reached me. I should like to a portrait-drawing of you, and you will perhaps let me know,


London; Dear Kahma. Your letter of Sunday 11 April arrived today. Now that you are double-spacing your text, and only using one side


London; Dear Mr. Feast. Thank you for your letter, and shall we say 10.30. on Tuesday May 11? The longer the sitting you can give me the better -


London; Dear Ezra (1) Thank you for your letter re. Eliot. I of course, being a red-blooded chap, respond suitably to what you report


London; Dear Mr. Mitchell. Going through a batch of letters yesterday I came across a rough draugh of a letter to you,


London; Dear Kahma. The first third of the novel should be here in 2 weeks now. It would be very bad policy to show 1/3 of a novel.


London; Dear Newton. In the Lefevre Gallery the other day I was horrified when I heard who it was. I must have appeared elaborately rude.


London; Dear Mr. Paige. Thank you for your letter to which this is a very tardy answer. It astonished me to discover that only a poor weak woman


London; Dear Sargent. This ought to reach you not later than Friday - before you have that is, Saturday 28th - Yes I shall be in London


London; Dear Sirs. I understand that you do not propose to republish "Tarr" and that I am now free to dispose of it elsewhere.


London; Dear Kahma. The first pieces of the novel has come: so let us get down to business. The story is like this, according to your letter.


London; Dear Giovanelli. Thank you for letter with much information. You did not tell me when you were going to Cuba:


London; Dear Mr. Editor. In payment for my article on de Tocqueville you sent me two years or more ago a cheque for 75 dollars.


London; Dear Sweeney. Your letter was a reminder of delightful evenings passed at your apartment - as you say,


London; Dear Kharma. This morning we read in the newspapers that the Columbia River is giving more trouble, and threatening to submerge


London; Dear Mr. Glover. I have communicated with Chattos and we may now proceed. As to the advance. What I propose is 150 [pounds];


London; Dear Stone. To begin with I must apologise for my long silence, and delay in acknowledging the arrival of a grand parcel


London; Dear Feast (reverend sir, I hope you will not regard this as too fresh!) thank you for your kind letter and the books.


London; Dear Mr. Glover. On my return to London I find your letter of June 8. The advantages accruing to publication by Penguin Books


London; Dear Mr. Glover. On my return to London I find your letter of June 8. The advantages accruing to publication by Penguin Books [Typed version of letter in folder 74.]


London; Dear Mr. Allott. Thank you for your letter. For a long time it has been my intention to take up "One Way Song" again,


London; Dear Mr. Mitchell. The other day I came upon the rough draft of a letter I had written you, clipped to your note announcing


London; Dear Feast. Good - you will arrive to give me orally the chapter I am waiting for. The new pattern presented in your last letter


London; Dear Mr. Mitchell. That incorrigeable being, Mr. Roberts, was true to form. Last Tuesday he unexpectedly left in the morning plane for Brussels:


London; Dear Sir. You are mistaken with regard to the ownership of the picture: it does not belong to me. But it belongs to someone.


London; Sir. Mr. Ralph Edwards is no stickler for precision. Having asserted that in a recent artile 'Une Baignade' was rated as a great modern masterpiece


London; Dear Mr. Roberts. The tree copies of 'America and Cosmic Man' you sent to me by hand yesterday were an all time low


London; Sir. Reading this correspondence, Miss Porter's mind has strayed to other levelments than those that would supervene


London; Dear Mr. Glover. I was unable again to contact you at West Drayton. The clauses about which I should be glad some enlightenment


London; Dear Kharma. Just a short letter, first to thank you for the promised butter parcel - though as you got unsealed so quickly


London; Dear Giovanelli. He will never do it, but you can try if you like to get Nash to act as follows: to ask him to send one thing,


London; Dear Mr. Palmer. Thank you very much for the transfer to New York. Thank you also for renewing your invitation to write


London; My dear Keidrych Rhys. Indeed I should be peculiarly glad to contribute to "Wales". I have seen single copies but to have a number of them


London; Dear Lynette Roberts. First let me thank you exceedingly for the 12 beautiful large white eggs. Thank you for the butter,


London; Next the Roll Mix. The parcel you sent before leaving arrived in good time. The bread it makes us to make spares


London; Dear Stone. Well I'm damned! You have circled round me and made your appearance where I least should have expected


London; My dear Sweeney. It was very nice to hear from you again. Sometimes in the Partisan Rev. or elsewhere I come across some writing of yours:


London; Sir. Mr. Edwards again! These museum officials work in shifts. But he now comes forward with a new illustration


London; Dear Mr. Page. I have just put aside a few E. P. letters for you. Do you want me to send them to Italy?


London; My dear Ezz. The writing (and reading) you would have me do is impossible. It takes me all my time to keep alive,


London; Dear Khama. Many apologies for the delay in acknowledging your letter and equally the receipt of 2 splendid cylinders of butter


London; My dear Rhys. I should have answered at once but dental preoccupations have obstructed practically everything.


London; Dear Lynette Roberts. Two things in your letter which have to do with myself require immediate action, and obliged me to make this


London; Dear Mr. Palmer. Thank you for your letter which I have received on my return from the country. I am very pleased that my article


London; Dear Lynette Roberts. Thank you first for the poems some of which I liked very much indeed especially "1943"


London; Dear Nash. Thank you for your letter, telling me that you are agreable to Gio's proposals. They were not mine of course.


London; Dear Mr. Paige. I sent you a note to the address you gave me in Italy some weeks ago. In it I informed you that I now have collected


London; Dear Sir. In the absence of Mr. Lewis I am returning the enclosed proof - to which I have added several items, [In third person but in Lewis' hand.]


London; Dear Mr. Swabey. Thank you for your letter. I agree with you naturally that Pound had no treasonable intuitions towards his native land,


London; Sir. In your critic's review of 'From Sickert to 1948' he chides Mr. Russell, who wrote a Foreword for that book. [With review Lewis is writing about.]


London; Dear John. By all means make use of both the letter and the poem, I should be very pleased and flattered to find them


London; Dear Mr. Allott. Thank you for your letter. It pleased me so much where you said you were puzzled I did not write any more verse.


London; Dear Dharma. This I fear is a very short letter. You let me say how much I enjoyed your last letter to me the receipt of which this is the long overdue acknowledgement;


London; Dear Low. I saw photos of you in St. Louis where I spent some time; I envied you the Missouri sun. Today I have mailed you my book


London; My Dear Stone. After some days delay I wrote you a longish letter to your Austrian address, which I feel somehow you did not receive.


London; Dear Pryce-Jones. I received your letter jesterday - oddly dated 17th Aug. It naturally seems to me pity that the letter was not published


London; Dear Mr. Allott. Thank you for your letter: the remuneration you mention is quite satisfactory to me. [With part of Lewis' autobiography.]


London; Dear Lynette Roberts. I am breaking my long silence: not to answer your charming and amusing letter but just to break the silence.


London; Dear Low. It is very generous of you to let me use one of your cartoons for a token payment only. Now as to the subject.


London; My dear Tomlin. How are you, after all these years? For one thing (let me answer for you) in a very much pleasanter spot


London; Dear Khama. First there are 3 most notable thanks due from me - (1) on account of 5.16 of excellent butter


London; Dear Giovanelli. I was very sorry to hear of the death of your father knowing your attachment. Scientific gentlement are so busy


London; Dear Nash. Splendid! The parcel has arrived safely at its destination. What is more I was pleasantly reminded of Phil Morris,


London; Dear Miss Shaeffer. Thank you for your letter. 'The Apes of God' is my property, and I should like to have it translated into French.


London; Dear Giovanelli. Your letter arrived in the morning mail. I answer it immediately, and shall send this letter off today, or in the morning.


London; Dear Dorothy. Conditiions here do not improve, and I am very anxious to get out of England for a while. I should probably go to Canada first


London; Dear Kharma. For 2 or 3 weeks I have not been well. There is (as far as I know and as far as the doctors can discover)


London; Dear Mr. March. Your letter (of 16 Sept) is, first of all unnecessarily rude. You may not have a carbon of it, so here is how you express yourself


London; Dear Lynette Roberts. There has been a lot of bother here otherwise I should have been writing you before this. The long poem is very fine


London; My Dear Stone. So that is where you are! It is tantalising to think of your relative nearness, for it would please me greatly to see you again.


London; Dear Mr. Sargent. Your letter has just arrived, and I am delighted to learn that you are taking the book, and am very much gratified personally,


London; Dear Miss Shaeffer. Thank you for your letter, and I am glad to hear you are going to translate some pages of the "Apes" for me to see.


London; Dear Tomlin. Your letter arrived today (Wednesday) and I was very glad to hear that in spite of war and offical cares


London; Dear Giovanelli. Your letter and Sargents arrived within a few hours of one another. As you may guess, I was enraptured.


London; Dear Giovanelli. Dear Gio. Your letter arrived this afternoon. My rage and disappointment may be imagined


London; My dear Low. It is very kind of you to allow me to use the drawings, and those you selected were precisely what I wanted.


London; Dear Giovanelli. The enclosed is a little over the odds and I hope no one in the publishing office sees it before the contract is signed.


London; Dear Gio. Your 2 letters arrived together this morning. - On Sept. 20 Sargent wrote to tell me that Doubledays unanimously okayed the book,


London; My dear Rhys. It was good news indeed that you like my massive vignette well enough to take it off right away to the printers


London; Dear Kharma. This again is no lengthy epistle. It is most kind of your wife and you to be concerned about my health.


London; Dear Lynette Robers. Enclosed are the lists of works with prices. When you have finished with them will you please make me a present of them.


London; Sir. Regarding the notice of "American and Cosmic Man" on Oct 2, I hope you will not think me uncivil, but the reviewer was no glutton for work.


London; Dear Giovanelli. Grand news! I have to thank you for this piece of good fortune - and I do thank you. Also I apologise for all the time


London; Dear Paige. Enclosed are copies of 12 E. P. Letters. About as many again will follow some time soon. Every line of the type-copy


London; Dear Gio. I have had a respite of a few hours and have been going through odds and ends of publicity material. I don't know what you have seen


London; Dear Gio. Letter arrived Saturday. This goes off first thing Monday (3 agreements likewise arrived and were redispatched to you


London; Dear Father Feast. Thank you for enquiring about my book in Cambridge and Norwich. In the former city the situation is as I should have expected.


London; Dear Gio. Yesterday mailed you copy of "T. S. Eliot" book. Therein pp. 220-223, you will find passage I send you now.


London; Dear Rhys. I have rather radically rearranged - not re-written - "The Rot". You did not tell me what was happening about that.


London; My dear Paige. Thank you for your letter. I am glad the packet of E. P. letters seemed to you worth copying out.


London; Dear Mr. Sargent. The agreement reached you safely, I lean. The two signatures resulted, as I explained upon a slip of paper,


London; My dear Stone. Just a note this time - many things are happening of which I will speak to you later: they monopolize my time


London; Dear Gio. Yesterday I sent off a short letter to Sargent. I had intended mailing copy to you at same time, but found cartoon mislaid


London; My dear Riichardson. It was a very pleasant surprise to see Detroit and the rest of the address on the envelope,


London; Dear Father. A very violent head cold visited me last Wednesday night. Much better now. Your letter came a little before the cold.


London; My dear Gio. A very violent head cold visited me on Wednesday night of last week. I am much better, but will write more fully


London; Dear Gwynne-Jones. There is obviously somebody or other who wishes to show the Pound portrait at this time - for I can hardly suppose


London; My dear Kahma. There has been a week's blank. A violent head cold. This is Monday - I am much better and hope I shall be all right


London; My dear Nash. A bestial headcold is - I believe - just departing, but I still feel a bit wooly. My silence has been abominable.


London; Dear Gwynne-Jones. Since, for some reason, you referred to me, I have expressed my wishes, as also any views


London; Dear Mr. Paige. Thank you for your letter and the draft of the proposed petition. This greatly delayed answer is owing to the fact


London; Dear Mr. Paige. Have just sent you, under separate cover, letter as you suggested. I trust that you will approve of the quality


London; Dear Mr. Paige. A short while ago I sent two registered and express letters: one for yourself, and one (at your suggestion)


London; Sir. The anonymous penman the there-words of who lucubrations are "of course", at last has spoken. From his long consultation


London; Dear Eliot. Your book, "Notes towards the Definition of Culture", which you were so kind as to direct Fabers to send me,


London; Dear Gio. Thank you for your Saturday Nov 5 letter. I should have expected election-week to entail paralysis of all the faculties


London; Dear Pryce-Jones. I am in receipt of your letter of Nov.10 - Firstly: You write: "we cannot possibly insert your letter this week,


London;


London; Very dear and Reverend. It is good news that you are coming up and stopping for a day or two.


London; Dear Mr. Good. It is some time since we coresponded, and it has occurred to me that you might be back in England now.


London; Dear Grigson. Thank you for what you wrote about me in Harpers Bazzar, a clipping of which has just reached me.


London; My dear Mr. Paige. Thank you for your letter and the specimen E. P. letter enclosed. Regarding the letter,


London; Dear Khama (or Kahma). Your letter came along today with the admirable forgery of an Ezra letter!


London; Dear Nash. Your Nov. 9 letter to hand. First, the picture question. It appears that such a transaction as you mention -


London; Dear Docker. The first two lines of "Your reviewers" letter are, as you say, of a most questionable veracity.


London; Dear MacLeish. In February I arrive in the U.S. to do some lectures and a little business. Do you know of any club or college


London; Dear Stone. I have hunted for your letter. But this room is a great mass of papers and books, the box in which I place letters overflowed last week,


London; Dear Nan Kivell. Thank you for your letter. I am delighted about your proposal - for a retrospective show of my work -


London; Dear Tambimuttu. Thank you for sending "Mtarajah." It's quite a poem! Sweeney give you the things you want.


London; Dear /eliot. A few days ago I wrote to tell you I had received your new book, "Notes towards a definition of Culture"


London; Dear Giovanelli. The book Eliot sent me was "Notes towards a definition of Culture." Now I have written him a second letter,


London; Dear Grigson. No, I was not aware of the existence of a painting in the Rutherstan Collection, and am glad to know of it.


London; Dear Mr. Paige. Contacted Porteus on the telephone yesterday, and passed on your enquiry. P. appeared surprised.


London; My dear Professor Allott. In the prose part of my contribution to the Penguin Anthology was I not a trifle indiscreet?


London; Dear Paige. Re. "Mister". - I don't know if what you say is warning me not to be fresh, or is apologising for being in so low an age-bracket


London; Dear Paige. Enclosed letter from a Mr. Kyllmann, senior partner of Constables (May Sinclair's publishers').


London; Dear Reverend. Thank you for your notes about subject in hand. It is my view that God was not for Satanial either a father or a boss;


London; My dear Gio. Influenza concluded. I will number items of this communication. (1) Have mailed (non-air; but registered)


London; Dear Kharma. Excuse the long delay in (i) answering your letter, and 2) acknowledging a most superb Santa Claus parcel,


London; Dear Rhys. One of the partners of Clifford Turner, 3. Old [Terrgey?]. E. C. (solicitors) - Monarch 1211, is a Welshman,


London; Dear Stone. Thank you for your sage and amusing letter. - Much that you say re. politics all-too-true.


London; Dear Sirs. The publishers of "America and Cosmic Man" have written me re. your request for a copy,


London; Dear Mr. Allott. Thank you for the correction about "Professor". - Owing to absences your letter of Nov. 28. has only just reached me.


London; Dear Paige. P.C. and letter to hand. - I had no idea there were so many of my works in Rapallo.


London; Dear Mr. Sargent. Here are the answers. I am pleased to note that your expert found me out in no conspicuous errors


London; Dear Gio. Thank you for note and letter of Dec.11 (latter arriving two days ago). My 'flu' left me some time ago:


London; Dear Khama. I should have written you much sooner - my excuse, as before, the multiplicity of my committments -


London; Dear Nash. This is to wish you a happy Christmas and to thank you enormously for the great Christmas parcel,


London;Dear MacLeish. Thank you for your letter, and as to the subjects I propose to discourse on, that will depend (as your question implies)


London; Dear Mr. March. The mss. of the Freedom book is now in your hand complete, except for 3 or 4 pages immediately preceding the conclusion.


London; Dear Mr. Sargent. Enclose are the Exemption Certificate Forms. (U.S. requires a duplicate it appears).


London; Dear Eliot. This morning I telephoned Fabers: a lady told me that, it being "a short week, you would probably not be coming in.


London; Dear Giovanelli. In my last letter I covered everything except the question of my visit to the U. S. About that I can say nothing


London; My dear Richardson. I am sorry to have been so long in writing, but after an abscence of six years you can imagine


London; ... As to my motive in desiring to lecture in the U.S.: to live in a bankrupt country in the throes of violet economic transformation


London; Dear Sirs. First of all, I would like to correct what I feel may be a misapprehension. Today I am hardly more affluent


London; ... Maryland: but perhaps you do not find much time to go down that famous thoroughfare. - Are you still working for the old Germans.


London; Sir. For some years past newspapers and periodicals have steadily been cutting down the space set aside for news of the fine arts.


London; Dear Mr. Colston Leigh. Why I have been so long in answering you, for which I must really apologise,


London; Dear Mr. Roberts. (or Dear Sirs - if to Nicholson and Watson). There are two matters,


London; Dear Sweeney. In letters Felix Giovanelli, a very good friend of mine, writes something about you


London; Dear Mrs. Orwell. As I informed you, by telephone, a book of cheque-stubs (Feb 25, 1948 to Sept. 1948)


London; My dear Gio. First, thank you tremendously for the trouble you took over the vita,


London; Dear Mr. Sargent. Your parcel was excellently times - it arrived on Christmas Eve.


London; Dear Sirs. Today I learned from the B. B. C. that you had been asked by them for my address [On verso AL[daft] to T. S. Eliot, January 13, 1949; With photostats of each side of leaf.]


London; Dear Kama. The Christmas was a long peace. But from the first minute of the next day I have been at it.


London; Dear Gio. Two letter - the last deferring to my long letter. Would it be a catherine wheel


London; Dear Sirs. By chance this afternoon I unearthed a note signed P. Braunstein,


London; Dear Eliot. Giovanelli was greatly delighted with the letter you wrote him: that very night it


London; Dear Mr. Mitchell. The other day as you were not there, I explained to your secretary what I wanted.


London; Dear Mr. Soby. The other day I was at the Lefebre Gallery. People showed me your new book,


London; Dear Symons. I was as flattered as I was surprised to hear on the air the staccato numbers


London; Dear John. Much water continues to crawl beneath the London bridges and I never see you.


London; Dear Mr. Feast. Long before this I should have written to thank you for (1) the copy of "The Revenge for Love",


London; Dear Nash. A really grand parcel arrived yesterday. The abundance of sugar (and the maple sugar) for instance,


London; Dear Paige. Than you for your letter of 17 Jan. - The Wellesley response is for my archives.


London; Dear Mr. Holgate. A friend (lady) agreed to do this index for me. There were I found - by accident,


London; Dear Mr. Sutherland. Here s the picture material for the book - 20 in all.


London; Dear Mr. March. Your letter surprised me very much. It was with regret that I learned of your father's death.


London; Dear Mr. Mitchell. Enclosed is Mr. March's letter and what normally I should reply. [With photostat of recto of AL[draft], Feb.1, 1949.]


London; Dear Mr. Feast. Excuse me for not writing before. Have been working my head off to get some things done


London; My dear Khama. Two of three weeks ago I wrote you a short letter. But it was too short


London; My dear Eliot. That is captal - scrutinizing my crowded engagement book, I find,


London; Dear Symons. Yesterday I telephoned and left a message for you - to say yes.


London; Dear Paige. Thank you very much for your letter. It is excellent news so far from Bard.


London; Dear Mr. Sargent. I will not recite the chapter of accidents involved in my effort of obtain satisfactory photos of myself.


London; My dear M. Palmer. It interested me profoundly to learn that a dossier had collected upon your editiorial desk


London; Dear Mr. Colston Leigh. You must I fear consider me a most unbusinesslike person,


London; My dear Paige. I am sorry I mistook a slight ephemeral embarrassment for an ugly economic situation.


London; My dear Mr. Weiss. Your address has been given me by Mr. Paige, and he has kept me posted


London; Dear Eliot. Have just returned from journey to Bradford, Manchester & so on, to arrange for loan of pictures.


London; My dear Gio. Your letter, like all your letters full of sunshine and the authentic sparkle of the grape-growing races,


London; Dear Sirs. I enclose application form, duly filled in. - There is only one point I will stress:


London; My dear Paige. Probably what I now report is old news to you. On Friday I asked Eliot about the letters.


London; My dear John. On 7 Feb. I wrote you a letter, more or less as under. By an oversight,


London; Dear MacLeish. Your letter of a month or so ago certainly seemed to suggest something promising.


London; Dear Mr. Marsh. It was with regret that I learned of your fathers death over a month ago.


London; My dear Nash. I must have seemed outrageously dilatory. Three magnificent parcels,


London; My dear Mr. Sargent. It was with distinct relief that I learned the photos would pass muster.


London; My dear Mr.[sic] Nan Kivell. This note is merely for clarification. It is about the two oil-paintings,


London; Dear Dorothy. I was glad to receive your letter and to learn that some of that sacro sanct commodity was being shipped.


London; My dear Allott. On dec. 18 last I mailed two identical letters, simultaneously, one to your university address,


London; Dear MacLeish. Since hearing from you a month or so ago I have been painting night and day


London; My dear Dorothy. This is splendid: I am glad that Paiage is getting some money. -


London; My dear Gio. Thank you for big letter and enclosures. You are angelic to bear with what might,


London; Dear Paige. In answer to what you wrote me - a bit hurried I fear. - (1) As far as I know, there is only the advance on royalties,


London; Dear Mr. Palmer. Thank you very much for extracting the relevant passage from the correspondence concerning my article.


London; Dear Mr. Palmer. Thank you very much for extracting the relevant passage from the correspondence concerning my article. [Another copy of letter in folder 71.]


London; My dear Mr. Soby. Some time ago I wrote you, but I daresay you no longer live in Farmington. Peploc, at the Lafevre Gallery, had rushed up


London; Dear Mr. Holgate. Enclosed is the Index - not that it is much use sending it in, as my poor book seems to be indefinitely held up.


London; Dear Mr. Nan Kivell. Your have not clarified for me those points of which I spoke in my letter. We had better get that tied up.


London; Dear Sir. It was agreed that I should remit monthly the sum of 2 pounds, which, as I had explained to you, was the utmost I could manage.


London; Dear Mr. March. I must now conclude that my letter is going to remain unanswered. Yet I am informed that you are back


London; Sir. Excuse me for breaking in upon your as it were private, and partisan, history-making. In your April issue, which I have just been sent,


London; My dearest Gio. Thank you for your letter and the enclosures: but be rational: Since the unspeakably degraded old Crowe


London; Dear Mr.?. Thank you for your letter. Your view of the London Group, I believe, may be, in some respect, identical with mine.


London; Dear Mr. Feast. Many thanks for your note. The show opens May 1. Had to push it on one month. I met two nuns yesterday


London; Dear Paige. A hast note - first, of peculiarly hearty thanks. For I believe Weiss has arranged for me to go to Bard to teach philosophy.


London; My dear Lynette R. Thank you for the old guacho trousers. - Have no rradio, so cannot listen to the reading of your poems


London; Dear Weiss. Your letter arrived this morning. It is very fine news that you have arranged a post for me. I am delighted.


London; Dear Docker. Yet another quarter day has come around. I hope and believe the last for me to have to say I have not the necessary 38 pounds.


London; Dear Mr. Leigh. Thank you for your lettere and the date you mention - fall 1950 or winter 1950-51, would suit me very well.


London; Dear Kahma. On last Sunday week I said to myself: "Tomorrow (Monday) I shall be wakened one hour before my getting-up time


London; My dear Eliot. A great many thanks for your letter for a U. S. college. It is excellent and should be almost as good as an arts degree,


London; Dear Mr. Schwartz. I have been moving about a great deal, so this answer to your letter is very much overdue.


London; Dear Weiss. This letter will be reaching you a week or more later than I had intended. This due to my having to go off [Both draft and copy have Vita added.]


London; My dear Gio. Thank you for your letter. The good news on the back of the envelope was cheering. I am eager to hear the details.


London; My dear Mr. Kenner. I have taken the unusual course of writing to a complete stanger as a drowning man clutches at a straw.


London; Dear Paige. It is with much pleasure - and a modest quantity of self-approbation - that I gather that you and the poetry-magnate of Faber


London; My dear Nash. This reply to your kind note must alas be but a brief message. Next - Monday - week (May 1) the pressure will have relaxed


London; Dear Mr. Vint. First let me say how very kind it was of you to put at my disposal for May the works in Bradford and Gateshead.


London; My dear Sir. Regarding visit to twon you speak of = if you want to see me it must be later. Have just got back from Manchester,


London; My dear Earp. At last I have your address (Dobson) & I wonder if we could meet. Perhaps you and May would come up here


London; Dear Dwight Macdonald. I was delighted to learn of your approval - though I knew you would appreciate certain things in my article.


London; Dear Mr. Allott. Believe it or not - as the bit about strange happenings in the newspapers is headed - but a day or two ago


London; Dear Mr. Handley-Read. Just a hurried note to thank you for your letter. I should of course be most willing to give you any assistance I can,


London; Never put my nose outside the door but I have the dreadful feeling I am going to pass you unrecognised in the hurrying crowd [With Lewis exhibition advertisement with her name written on it.]


London; Dear Nan Kivell. Re. The Eliot portrait. - It is agreed that this portrait should be distinct and in no way involved with one other arrangement.


London; Dear Mr. Handley-Read. The 16th I shall be delighted to see you here, and give yo what help I can. It will I am afraid be very much wanting


London; Dear Mrs. Newton. Thank you for your letter; my wife and I would like very much to come next Friday 13th. We shall arrive


London; My dear Sir. I feel extraordinarily ungregarious just now, having seen of late far too many people, and it is true that antipathy to the undergraduate


London; Dear Mr. Fuller. My absence in Paris on a flying-visit was responsible for the considerable delay in answering your kind letter


London; My dear Gio. Your two letteres arrived simultaneously today (monday) at 3.30. Both seethe with promise. It is excellent that Sargent has succeeded


London; Dear Mr. Kenner. Am just back from a flying-visit to Paris, which accounts for the lateness of this answering note.


London; Dear Mr. Ridgeway. I have been so exclusively engrossed in the task of preparing a large retrospective exhibition that I have,


London; My dear Earp. I cannot tell you how pleased I was with your notice in the Telegraph + and its use will be boundless.


London; Dear Ackerley. First, what you said in your letter about my Listeneer articles was tremendously gratifying.


London; Dear Chama. A whole string of thanks to start with: The food parcel duly arrived and is being gratefully ddevoured.


London; Dear Ayrton. I am glad that the Foreword was alright. - You say you have encountered jealouly already: much more of it,


London; Dear Eliot. Thank you for the copy of your note for "Time", and for certain handsome passages of same. If that graveyard scene


London; My dear Gio. Your letter just arrived. It is indeed good news about "Commentary". There are the other two names who say they will write articles


London; My dear Heath. Thank you for your note. It did not surprise me to hear that you had left Hutchinsons.


London; Dear MacLeish. As things are now arranged, in order to get to the States some dollar-getting or "cultural" mission must be alleged.


London; Dear Barr. Enclosed are a couple of notices (I have had a gig and excellent press) of a show of my work. There is among other things a portrait of Eliot,


London; Dear Professor Brooks. As obvious Hugh Kenner (a student of yours I assume) is no position to do a great deal.


London; Dear Paige. My exhibition has kept me fairly busy, and I have not seen Eliot to talk to much since the sittings.


London; See box 8, folder 9.5. Removed from correspondence box to go into Lewis manuscript box.


London; Dear Sirs. No press clipping agency over here supplies American Press Clippings, so I shall remain in complete ignorance [Regarding "America and Cosmic Man"]


London; Dear Mr. Brooks. I am most grateful to you for your amiable letter: and if I do succeed, somehow, in getting to the States,


London; Dear Gio. Enclosed letter was written long ago, as you will see, and had been posted I believe. Came across it yesterday


London; Dear MacLeish. Upon returning from the north I find your note and am most grateful for your action re. Sarah Lawrence College.


London; My dear Rothenstein. Today I brought the T. S. Eliot portrait to the Tate, and it was taken up to your office.


London; Dear Sir. I write to thank you for two copies of the Sat Review. of May 21, which you were so kind as to send me.


London; My dear Khama. (1) A most awfully interesting letter, and (2) a first-rae parcel, containing tins of butter among other good things,


London; Dear Mr. Handley-Read. A letter from T. S. Eliot has just arrived, apprising me of your plan for a book, and enquiring what I think about it.


London; Dear Rothenstein. I have just learned from someone at the Tate that my portrait of T. S. Eliot was not bought.


London; Dear Mr. Macdonald. I have been rushing around the north of England again, and have just found your kind letter,


London; Sear Stone. We have not got to the States yet. I forget whether I told you about the prospect of a big show of pictures of mine?


London; Dear Miss Thomas. Thank you very much for the cuttings and I was delighted to hear of Doubledays satisfaction [Thomas was a Doubleday employee.]


London; Dear Mr. Vint. I wonder if you would be so very kind as to tell me the Bradford address of the "Yorkshire Observer."


London; Dear Eliot. I was delighted to receive your most reassuring letter. So the matter is settled, bar the question of procedure.


London; My dear Gio. The cuttings have just arrived. Thank you very much for taking all this trouble. - Some one tells me - my dentist


London; Dear Eliot. I have received the cheque for 300 pounds, for which many thanks. What was the significance of the additional 50?


London; My dear Eliot. The more I consider the contents of the two letters I received this morning, from yourself and from I.A. Richards,


London; My dear Khama. Thank you for your letter, thank you for 1- food parcel and stationery parcel and for cuttings from "New Yorker"


London; Dear Mr. Barr. A young Negro artist named Denis Williams (of British Guiana) is passing through New York, on his way home.


London; My dear Gio. Thank you for the cuttings. All I have seen have been favourable, from the "New Yorker" to the provincial press,


London; Dear Mr. Soby. A young Negro artist named Denis Williams (of British Guiana) is passing through New York, on his way home.[same as letter to Alfed Barr, folder 20.]


London; Dear Mr. Williams. Here are two (identical) letters to Mr. Soby and Mr. Barr. The latter is Chairman of the Board of Governors,


London; Dear Mr. Williams. Here is the letter I promised you for Mr. Barr, Chairman of Board of Directors, Metropolitan Museum,


London; Dear Mr. Williams. Here are two (identical) letters to Mr. Soby and Mr. Barr. The latter is Chairman of the Board of Governors, [A third copy of the letter from folder 24.]


London; My dear John. When your answer to a letter of mine arrived earlier in the year, I drafted a letter, but through some oversight,


London; Dear Sir. On my return I find your note, containing a new claim. - Will you please inform me what is now owing, [Addressed "To The Manager".]


London; My dear Mr. Handley-Read. Thank you for your letter: and I was very glad to hear you had after all been able to get the full plan off


London; Dear Mr. Kinnard. I am ashamed to be answering so long a time after the arrival - in my absence - of your kind note.


London; Dear Mrs. Searle. Here is the substitute note for the "Arghol" drawing. "Arghol" is a character in a play, written by me in 1914.


London; Dear Mr. Vint. We have been spending a little time at a small farm in the outer suburbs, and now I find your letter,


London; Dear Mr. Handley-Read. Your letter very disagreably surprised me of course. You started by saying "Now I think I know where I stand/ etc."


London; My dear Khama. You are always asking me what I want. Well, next to butter, my major shortage is bread.


London; My dear Nash. On top of my highly successful picture exhibition, which involved a lot of extra activity, I undertook to write a book


London; My dear Nash. On top of my highly successful picture exhibition, which involved a lot of extra activity, I undertook to write a book [Typed copy of letter in folder 34.]


London; Dear Eliot. Your letter has just arrived and I am glad to hear everything is arranged regarding the portrait.


London; Dear Mr. Handley-Read. Thank you for your letter and the rough draft of what you will eventually send to Fabers.


London; Dear Stone. Alas, I have been away and your letter has just caught up with me. - There is not question, I fear, of my getting to Paris


London; Dear Khama. Thank you for your long and very interesting letter in answer to a long letter of mine.


London; My dear Nash. A billion thanks for sending the mixes with such expedition. That is wonderful - I shall not be thrown back on the awful stuff


London; Dear Miss Pearl. The Redfern Gallery have forwarded your letter. I am mailing, by sea letter-post, a glossy photograph


London; Dear Mr. Rose. Your letter has been forwarded me by my ex-publisher. You tell me you are engaged upon a "dissertation"


London; Dear Miss Thomas. The reviews of my book "America and Cosmis Man", must be about complete, by now.


London; Dear Mr. Vickers. I am afraid that although one of the shots you took of me seemed fairly good to me (the one with the fist


London; Dear Mr. Watt. Thank you for having discovered so eminantly satisfactory a part for the old "Tarr", and for "Wild Body"


London; Dear Mr. Handley-Read. Your letter came this morning. My position is a slightly difficult one, since I am naturally unwilling to repay you


London; Dear Eliot. Thank you for the adjestment in my favour in the cheque you sent for the purchase of the portrait.


London; Dear Richards. The only reason for my not writting sooner is that I have no address except Magdaline, and I feel rather doubtful about it.


London; Dear Mr. Handley-Read. It appears that I was mistaken and that the three pages you sent me are notes only: that there will be another 2 or 3


London; Dear Mr. Dow. Thank you for your letter and enclosure. There is nothing I would more gladly help to promote than sensible relations


London; My dear Eliot. You are I suppose now back from Edinburgh. I was very glad to read, by the way, that your play performed up there


London; My dear Mr. Handley-Read. You return to Bryanston on the 18th? You should I think aim at getting the whole transcript ready


London; Dear Mrs. Pearl. Of the 1938 portrait I have no photograph. I loaned the London office of "Time" a book in which the portrait is reproduced:


London; Dear Khama. I am interested in your autobiography and I am interested in your dissertations: but do allow me to say that they mix awfully bad.


London; Dear Williams. This is a very tardy reply to your communications: but I have been moving about the country,


London; Dear Mr. Rose. Thank you for your letter. The reason I asked for enlightenment was because, had you been an undergraduate at Harvard,


London; Dear Sirs. I cannot understand whether the list of figures you sent me records cash payments to you on account or not.


London; Dear Eliot. Practically any day except nexyt Monday will be all right for a meal. Let us go (lunch or dinner) to the Ivy Restaurant


London; My dear Richards. As you will have learned I expect the Eliot portrait No. 2 is to hand in Magdalene College -


London; Dear Lynette Roberts. Yesterday I returned from field-work in the Midlands and received your letter.


London; Dear Swabey. This is a line or two only - for I must delay no more in but acknowledge your kind letter of Sept.29,


London; Dear Handley-Read. For a matter of 10 days I have been engaged in field-work in East Anglia, though I should have sent you a note


London; Dear Handley-Read. I have been very remiss in not writing sooner. The fact is I am trying to get a book finished.


London; Dear Pasmore. Thank you for your note and enclosure. The photographs interest me very much, and I am look forward a great deal


London; Dear Mr. Russell. I am most obliged for the two copies of "Nine", which appears to me an extremely good start


London; My dear Khama. Enclosed is a long note I wrote you as soon as I received your mss. but I could find no one to type it.


London; Dear Swabey. No man is my equal as a bad correspondent. However, thank you for the very interesting material


London; My dear Khama. First my wife had 'flu. Then I acquired it from her. And when it went away it came back again.


London; My dear Gio. I was glad to hear that all was well and have been trying to sit down to write to you ever since -


London; My dear Mr. Sargent. At the top of your letter I see the date Aug. 20, and I am horrified. The fact is, I have not been in one place


London; Dear Sir. I am writing re. the non-delivery of washing. The reason given is that the road is up. But it is only up on one side:


London; My dear Khama. Now I have to write a very different letter to the other one I enclose. First, I want you to believe me


London; My dear Mr. Swabey. Thank you very much for telling me about the village school conflict up-to-date. It is full of interest.


London; Dear Mr. Cohen. Thank you for the copy of "Commentary" which you were so kind as to send me. The wrong review appeared


London; Dear Mr. Fleig. I am in receipt of your letter. Will you telephone me please?


London; Dear Gio. Thank you for your letter. I don't suppose the yarns about Rosenwald not tipping every Negro he sees mean very much.


London; Dear and Reverend Sir! For some time I have been obliged to suspend all correspondence. Some work (with a deadline to it)


London; My dear John. Thank you for your note and for the Delphic Review. I was glad to hear I had given proof of second sight,


London; Dear Colston Leigh. A most surprising thing has happened. After a year's most cordial correspondence with you, I received


London; My dear Mr. Palmer. Thank you for the cheque, and also for the copy of the Nov. "Sewanee", which arrived during my absence.


London; My dear Lynette. We shall both be very pleased to see you again. Give notice of your approach.


London; Dear Mr. Watt. Please forgive me for not answering your letter before. First there was 'flu,


London; Dear Mr. Wrong. A copy of "commentary" was very kindly sent me by the editor.


London; Dear Mr. de le Mare. These are practically all the photographs. The best grouping I think would be (1)


London; Dear Mr. Watt. Methuen have about 50 thousand words of a near 70 to 80 thousand words book


London; Dear Mr. White. Perhaps I ought to write to say that (1) "Rotting Hill" is not a title I insist on at all.


London; Dear Mr. de la Mare. Confirming what was said on the telephone, the parties to the agreement


London; My dear Heath. I was delighted to hear that all is as it should be. I feared you might encounter difficulties


London; My dear Khama. In this pause, during a long holiday, let me get the promised letter written. First, answers to queries.


London; My dear Mr. Handley-Read. I have an awfully uncomfortable feeling that you are displeased. Can you dispel it?


London; ... Thank you very much for your invitation to the Wedding Party. As it is, I am half way to blindness, or nine-tenths


London; Dear Carter. I was delighted to hear that you had read the Human Age and liked it. I have not found a publisher for it in America.


London; Dear Mr. Ashley Dukes. Extreme thanks for transmitting to me the message from the Garrick Club: and thank you also for forgiving me


London; Dear Eliot. Nov. 3rd will do excellently. Should we say seven o'clock. It is very kind of you to suggest giving us dinner, [not in Lewis' hand]


London; Dear Eliot. Three TL's in bin, and do not pay any attention to it. It is just a line to say how delighted I was with the reassuring news


London; Dear Reverend Faustus. I cannot imagine what has happened to you; but I daresay that you feel the same about me. [Not Lewis' hand.]


London; Dear Glass. Thank you for your letter and I regret to hear that you have not been well. It is excellent news that you have secured


London; Dear Joyce. All the happy feelings you had were also experienced by us, and may they be repeated as often as possible. [On same leaf AL to Mrs. Hirst, n.d.. Not in Lewis' hand.]


London; Dear Joyce. All the happy feelings you had were also experienced by us, and may they be repeated as often as possible. [Photostat of same leaf in folder 98. On same leaf AL to Mrs. Hirst, n.d.. Not in Lewis' hand.]


London; [Out of date sequence. Removed and put in box 80.folder 110.2.]


London; ... It bristles with difficulty. God is a big problem. The sorting out of the dialogues is another. As a theologian I am inferior


London; Removed due to date, put in box 80. folder 110.4]


London; Naomi. Delighted to see you four Monday. Sorry about telephone dial zero and ask exchange for number.


London; Dear Mr. Spears. Thank you for your letter, and I am sorry to hear that the Navy have laid claim to Mr. Palmer.


London; Cablegram Morgan. Will November first be all right for review of [C..?] book. Letter on way


London; Dear Docker. My apologies for not answering your letter sooner, but I have been awaiting the call from your office


London; Dear Mrs. Webb. I must apologize for having failed to answer your letter, but the fact is so much of my time and energy


London; Dear White. Thank you for your letter. I shall be very glad to have at me unexpurgated copy of copy of my book.


London; Dear Mr. .... Thank you for your letter which I have taken a long time to answer but I have been in different parts of Europe


London; Dear Kenner. Enclosed is Wagner's article in "Nine". Then I mailed a copy of your article to Peter Kassel;


London; My dear Froanna. I was so glad you arrived without mishap, and that Hell's and Megrich's farm is the dream-come-true


London; Dear Mrs. Webb. I duly received your letter, but at the moment was engaged in a struggle with your Production Manager,


London; Dear Mr. Fleig. Thank you very much for (1) the copy of "Die Tat", and for (2) so kindly procuring the information


London; My dear Giovanelli. On Jan. 20 I have to go into a nursing-home for about two weeks according to present comptations).


London; My dear Mr. Palmer. Thank you for your kind letter. I should be delighted to send you something else before long,


London; Dear Mr. du Sautoy. Thank you for your letter and draft of agreement. - It would be better, I agree with you,


London; Dear Docker. The doctors are urgent: if some toxin is not removed I lose my sight. Monday they start pumping in penincillin.


London; Dear Mr. Swabey. Forgive me for not at once asknowledging your letter and mss. but I have been much occupied with doctors.


London; Dear and reverend! I was much complimented by your silence. Your faith in my constitution is so great


London; As you see, the accompanying note was typed but not corrected before I entered [Handwritten note on copy states: To Giovanelli (with letter date 18 Jan.)]


London; The letter dated Jan. 18 was ready to mail all but corrections. It was brought to me in nursing-home [Handwritten not on copy states: To Kavid Khama (accompanying other sheet dated Jan. 18.)]


London; Dear Naomi. It would be great fun to do a portrait-drawing of your brother.


London; My dear Swabey. Many apologies for not acknowledging earlier you kind letters and mss. and the mags.


London; Dear Richards. Is it possible to obtain in the U. S. some job as "resident artist",


London; Dear Khama. First: a parcel of Mix appeared on the next day after the dispatch of my letter. Additons made March 1 and 11 March.]


London; My dear Newton. Thanks for the typescript of your essay for the Faber book.


London; Dear Mr. White. Here is the title-story. (The paper is American, & works out at about 310 words a page -


London; Dear Mr. Philip James. Since January I have been unable to attend to correspondence.


London; My dear Eliot. It was very kind of you to send me a copy of "The Cocktail Party".


London; My dear Meyrick. We were both delighted to get your letter, which took, by the way, 12 days


London; Dear Philip James. Thank you for supplying me with the information I required. I must decline


London; My dear Eliot. You will be receiving this week Handley-Read's contribution. He read it to me


London; Dear Mr. Ackroyd. Thank you for offering to lend me a copy of "Air Conditioned Nightmare",


London; Dear Mr. Ackroyd. Thank you for offering to lend me a copy of "Air Conditioned Nightmare", [Same as typed version of letter in folder 15. On verso of AL[draft] is one to Julian Trevelyan, dated Apr.8, 1950.]


London; Dear Dr. Bull. You will recall that I asked you before we began whether it was very expensive. [Draft also contains AL[draft] to Henry Swabey on recto and AL[draft] to Willis Feast on recto. All of same date. Photostat is of recto of draft leaf.]


London; Dear and reverend Festus. Paschal greetings! I was indeed distressed to learn of your indisposition. [Typed version of draft in folder 17.]


London; My dear Kahma. First, let me say that I am for some reason glad to learn that you are not black.


London; My dear Swabey. Thank you for the Dunmow magazine. Your editorials become more [Typed version of draft in folder 17.]


London; Dear Trevelyan. I see for my sins oceans of pictures every month, and yours, as I wrote,


London; My dear Naomi. Have telephoned several times to Temple. Noone there. Your last letter


London; My dear Symons. Thank you for the review of "Tarr" in "Tribune", the best account of that book


London; My dear John. Very sorry about the other night. I have bid to withstand a good many shocks [On verso TL[draft] to Dr. [?] Fant. With photostat of recto letter to John.]


London; My dear Mr. Palmer. You must have wondered what had happed to me. I will explain.


London; My dear Campbell. First the Catacomb. There is no need for me to read it - which I have not


London; Dear Campbell. It is evident from your note that you are passing a far pleasanter summer


London; Dear Sirs. Your letter has just reached me - it was forwarded to the wrong address.


London; Dear Mr. Watt. If I said in my last letter as you tell me I did, "I am quite sure what you have done


London; Dear Eliot. Thank you for your letter. I fully relise that the urgency of the matter has been


London; My dear Eliot. Under the circumstances I will enclose this (writing private on it) in the letter


London; My dear Eliot. I was sorry I could not see you before Thursday week. I should like to see you


London; Dear Mr. .... Regarding your letter of 17 August, I will be glad to supply you with a page


London; Dear Miss Saunders. The facts, extremely briefly, are these. (1) My absence from England


London; Dear Symons. I have had several thies on telephone, but Challock was silent.


London; Dear Eliot. What I propose, briefly, is a seventy or seventy-five thousand work book


London; Dear Docker. In case we do not meet on Friday next, although I hope we shall:


London; Dear Mr. Carter. Regarding your letter of 17 Aug., I shall be glad to supply you with a page [Typed version of leaf in folder 32.]


London; Dear and Reverend! Forgive this infinitely tardy response. In the first place, we went to Sweden,


London; My dear Booth. Your details about the farm surprised me in one respect. I am most ignorant


London; My dear Ackerley. As you advised, I have visited the best of the exhibitions. But practically


London; Dear White. I find I have not quite enough short stories for the book plan. [Not in Lewis' hand.]


London; Dear Read. Thank you for your letter. You tell me that you always endeavour to please me,


London; My dear Mr. White. It gave me the greatest pleasure to hear that "Rude Assignment" interested you.


London; Dear Booth. The address of the Paris doctor has been found, 24 hours after sending off my telegram.


London; Dear Kahma. You must excuse my seeming dilatoriness in writing. My eyes have again


London; Dear Eliot. I hear you are back. What I am writing about is the dismissal of Eric Newton


London; Dear Laughlin. Thank you for your letter, which I have left so long unanswered because I have not been well.


London; [Removed and placed in box 56, folder 2.5.


London; Dear McLeod. Thank you for your letter. The dictaphone the idea of which filled me with delight


London; Dear McLeod. At the time of the receipt of your letter, a reply was drafted, but it did not get typed.


London; Dear Naomi. Thank you for your letter. Please note that we have now moved back to Studio A [On verso is AL[draft] to Ivor Armstrong Richards, [1951]. Draft dictated to another.]


London; Thank you for informing me of the great honour which has been done me -


London; ... Wolfit's performance was so incredibly fine and he after all carried on his back the main


London; Dear Dr. Fant. Our conversation the other day has convinced me that it is no use looking


London; Dear Mr. Douglas Glass. Thank you for your letter. I should be delighted to sit for you, of course.


London; Dear Richards. I have your letter and was very interested in what you said about China.


London; Dear White. After our telephone talk I had a look at the lawyers further note. By all means delete


London; Dear Kahma. The letter you received a week or so ago was posted a week or more after it was written.


London; My dear Richards. Some time ago I received your letter, wrote to you in reply, and then found


London; Dearest Reverend Faustus. I was most ashamed and disgusted at having to miss you on your last trip


London; My Dear Grigson. I was awfully glad to hear from Methuen that you were doing the booklet.


London; My dear Ackerly. Am afraid I depressed you by my account of the dark room into which I am


London; Dear McLeod. Thank you for your kind letter. The moment has arrived when work on my novel


London; Dear Scott-James. Thank you for the copy of "Britain Today", with the very excellent review


London; Dear Docker. Your letter arrived this morning (Wednesday). It was extremely kind of you


London; Dear Mr. Inglis. Here are the facts promised me by the Redforn Gallery. Eventually please return this,


London; Dear Naomi. I was very pleased to receive such a nice long letter from Pakistan.


London; Dear Porteus. It is perfectly true that I am extremely rapidly losing my sight,


London; Dear Richards. Excuse me for delaying this answer, but I have been moving about.


London; Dear Mr. Southall. Many apologies are due to you for the unconscionable delay in answering


London; Dear Richards. Mr. Huntington Cairns got in touch with me a few days ago. I had lunch


London; Dear Glass. Everyone agrees that the photographs are unusually good. T. S. Eliot declares


London; My dear Grisgon. I have just finished reading your extraordinarily well-composed and beautifully written


London; Dear White. Enclosed is the Mss. of Grigson's essay, which is, I think, almost a model of


London; Dear Twentieth Century Faust of Booton. I was considerably scandalized to learn that like your


London; My dear Kahma. I was delighted to receive your charming letter; to hear of your trip to the U.S.


London; Dear McLeod. Your letter somewhat astonished me: for when you came to see me you described


London; Dear Porteus. Thank you for your letter. I was very sorry to hear that you had lost the News Service job.


London; Dear Omar. Thank you for the forty-two pounds, which I have duly received,


London; Dear Mr. Spender. Your letter gave me the greatest plesure: coming from a one-time sitter and a poet [Draft dictated to another.]


London; Dear Scott-James. Thank you for your nice letter, and it was a delightful surprise to hear that the ecxellent review was by your daughter.


London; My dear Docker. I am as truly thankful, as I am to the Lord for the meals He provides, for the rent money which arrived this morning.


London; Dear Bridson (Mister I must no longer say). It is easy to thank an actor for giving a magnificent performance, but it is a very difficult


London; Dear Mr. Edwards. It is true that I am allergic to flattery but not to respectable acclaim. Let me assure you that esteem[Draft dictated to another.]


London; Dear Mr. Bridson. Here are (1) the piece for the end as promised (2) the booklet, Grigson. By the way, I should have said


London; Dear Eliot. Since your return from America in the Autumn I had heard nothing from you, and so was on the point of writing.


London; Dear Cynthia Thompson. I have been away in Ireland, with no mail forwarded and did not receive your kind and charming letter


London; My dear Adams. Your letter brings back the past. My article in the Listener has been productive of my many pleasant surprises,


London; Dear Eliot. On the eighteenth something is happening to which I am obliged particularly to attend, and on the following day,


London; Dear Miss Gregory. Your letter, so instinct with friendly feeling, arrived during my absence in Ireland.


London; My Dear Hilton. Alas, we have not met much since those days when we would go to Frascatis for lunch, and I in my


London; Dear Miss Pickard. I hasten to acknowledge your kind letter, as I was away in Ireland, when it arrived.


London; Dear Kerrison Preston. Since the days when you and I were snub-nosed brats at Rugby school (were you in my form or what?)


London; Dear Rothenstein. I have been over to Ireland which is why I have been so long in answering your letter.


London; Dear Rothenstein. I have been over to Ireland which is why I have been so long in answering your letter. Typed copy of letter in folder 93


London; Dear Symons. Thank you for your note and for the various activities on my behalf you announce. I am surprised to hear


London; Dear Miss Vanner. Your interesting letter arrived while I was away in Ireland. I now hasten to acknowledge it.


London; Dear Eliot. The twenty-sixth, at about half past seven, will suyit me very well. In case I did not send the complete address,


London; My dear Naomi. Owing to a very distu bed life, full of movement, I have, alas, omitted to answer your very kind letter.


London; Dear Mrs. Richards. Thank you for your note. I have moved to near Victoria Station, actually,


London; Dear White. My new address is Ashley Mansions, Flat 18. 254 Vauxville Bridge Rd., London S.W.1. Tel. Vic. 9377.


London; My dear John. As you will see from the enclosed slip I have changed my residence. This place is at the Victoria Station end


London; Dear Sir. The nature of my disability is as follows: I am unable to see to read or write. This is owing to pressure upon the optic nerve


London; Dear Mrs. Gray. Thank you for your letter of June 29th and the terms as outlined there are agreeable to me.


London; Dear Khama. The enclosed new address slip will partly explain my delay in answering your extremely kind and interesting letter.


London; Dear Richards. It is very disappointing that the Radio Records of "The Childermass" are not available for the United States.


London; Dear Sir. Enclosed a money order for Ten Pounds, the sum agreed to by the Deputy Rating-Officer [Written on Lewis' behalf.]


London; Dear Mr. Raymond. Your letter has only just reached me as I have been out of London. Since for twenty years I have had no royalty reports


London; Dear Richards. I hope that you and your wife will dine with me when next you are in London. [Draft dictated to another. Also on recto and verso is AL to Roy Cambell, July 14, 1952 and on verso AL to Alan Price-Jones, July 14 1951; with photostat of both recto and verso. Plus TL version of letters to Richards and Price-Jones.]


London; Dear Mr. Silvester. I am proposing to pay into my account Five Hundred pounds, to be followed before very long by other sums.


London; Dear Mr. Broadbent. I should have acknowledged immediately your letter, and the cheque for one hundred pounds,


London; Dear Stuart Gilbert. It is many years since we last met, but I understand you are in the same place as before.


London; Dear Sirs. I am in receipt of your letter of the eleventh of July, with reference to my book 'Tarr'. May I ask what is the


London; Dear Stuart Gilbert. It is many years since we last met, but I understand you are in the same place as before. [Formal typed letter of that in folder 11.]


London; Dear Mr. Raymond. Thank you for your letter and the accompanying document for me to sign. Of course


London; My dear Fergusson. Your letter brings back in a rush many images of great remoteness. I see cafes in Paris [Draft dictated to another.]


London; My dear Stuart Gilbert. Your letter reached me yesterday and I am extremely obliged for the information.[Draft dictated to another.]


London; My dear Stuart Gilbert. Your letter reached me yesterday and I am extremely obliged for the information.[Formal letter version, same as that in folder 15.]


London; Dear Kahma. As you will see from the address at the top of this letter we have fled from Ashley Mansions back to our old place.


London; Dear Dorothy. For some time there have been many complications in my life, not only my loss of sight.[Draft dictated to another.]


London; Dear Lynette. Thank you for your note, and I think you are acting most wisely. You will see from the notepaper I am using


London; [Removed as it was out of date sequence.]


London; Dear Mrs. Webb. I am in receipt of your letter, and must apologise, firstly, for the delay in completing my book,


London; Dear Bridson. Let me explain to begin with why I have not written earlier. My desire to get everything out of the wasy


London; Dear Kahma. Let me send a quick (but earnest) message. Why not have another slap at a book?


London; Dear Richards. When I heard that you were broadcasting about the Childermass, I do not have to tell you how uncommonly pleased I was. [Draft dictated to another.]


London; Dear Swabey. Thank you for your two notes. Toronto appears to have been in a very dramatic mood during your stay. [Draft dictated to another.]


London; Dear Dr. Morris. I should receive the degree of Doctor of Letters, it it were offered me,


London; Dear Tom. I was glad to hear that your first lick at my Rotting Hill appeared to indicate a wholesome dish.


London; My dear John. Shall look forward to seeing you after Christmas. - I should have sent you a copy


London; My dear Kahma. I was terribly glad to see that you had broken into the Vancouver Press.


London; Dear Richards. Please forgive me for this greatly delayed letter. I is not my fault.


London; Dear Mr. Dobree. Thank you for your letter. I am delighted to hear that we shall be meeting


London; Sir. In you issue of December the Twenty-eight I find myself described as "American Author and Artist".


London; Dear Tom. May I suggest a restaurant in this neighborhood (which is also, I believe, yours). [Draft dictated to another.]


London; Dear Tom. Thank you for offering to call for me on the way, and I shall expect you between 7.15 and 7.30 [Draft dictated to another.]


London; Dear Bridson. I am sorry it was necessary to postpone our meeting. My wife and I are proposing [Draft dictated to another.]


London;(1) I have read carefully the statement in which the applicant sets forth his project. [Draft dictated to another.]


London; Dear Miss Hayes: I am in receipt of your letter of the 8th February. This is quite the first I have [Draft dictated to another.]


London; Dear Ashley Dukes. My most recent reason for offering you my apologies was this morning's misunderstanding.


London; Dear White. Thank you for your congratulation but please do not begin calling me Doctor W.L. [Draft dictated to another.]


London; Dear W. F. Your epistolary style has greatly improved with the possession of a typewriter. [Draft dictated to another.]


London; Dear Mr. Cass. My official reply to your reequest reached you, I hope, without accident? [Draft dictated to another.]


London; Dear Miss Hayes. For the last two weeks I have been out of action. I must apologise for my seeming neglect. [Draft dictated to another.]


London; Dear Mr. Stubix. There is an ugly blank in my life across which is written the work CONJUNCTIVITIS. [Draft dictated to another.]


London; Dear Richards. Geoffrey Bridson procurred for me the text of your exceptionally fine broadcast


London; Dear Bridson. Please mark above address. Froanna and I have terminated our visits,


London; Dear Kahma. Thank you for your letter and cuttings - but what a repulsive thought,


London; Dear Dobree. It is a long time since we met: but it may be that in the autumn,


London; My dear Nash. I regret, though now I understand, since you have explained what was going on


London; Dear Mr. Rose. Thank you for your note, I was about to answer at some length your last letter,


London; Dear Mr. Selby. On returning this week I find your two letters, and feel very guilty


London; Dear White. Thank you for the Regnery Cheque. What I now have to do is to fill up the form they sent me


London; Dear Mr. Wagner. Had you told me in the first place that you were English, a nephew of my old colleague Wadsworth,


London; Dear Mr. Aiken. For a long time I have known and admired you as a writer, but regret to say we have never met


London; Dear Mr. Dobson. Thank you for your letter. It is good news that we are to meet in the autumn


London; My dear Grigson. On the 19th and 26th on this month respectively, Muethuen's are publishing a reprint


London; Dear Richards. I am delighted to hear that you and your wife are in England again. Let us meet soon.


London; Dear Gilling Smith. The magazine has arrive[sic]. I am ashamed of myself for giving you all this trouble.


London; Dear Miss Sturge Moore, As to the quotation from your father's text, I have no objection at all (of course)


London; Dear Mr. Allen. I should bery much like to meet you. If this is not too far out, will you have a cocktail with me


London; Dear Mr. Allen. I am so glad you can come. The entrance to these Studios is between shops


London; My dear Kahma. I have been putting off writing from week to week, hoping to get some better news for you.


London; Dear Mr. Regnery. Your letter has just arrived - a very refreshing and encouraging missive.


London; Dear Mr. Regnery. I have been moving about or you would have heard from me sooner.


London; Dear Mr. Conrad Aiken. I have been moving about, because of the summer, and I am afraid


London; My dear Ezz. Thank you for your communications re "Writer and Absolute". It is no use protesting


London; My dear Mr. Regnery. Thank you very much for the additional information about Mr. Blodgett,


London; Dear Mr. Ingles. I enclose the form you sent me and asked me to sign. - Also enclosed is a money order


London; Dear Mr. Ingles. Enclosed are the documents about which I telephoned you. - Let me recall;


London; Dear Mr. Russell Reynolds. Of the twelve pounds fifteen shillings, which is all that remains


London; Dear Mr. Selby. I hope you will excuse the lateness of this reply, but I have been moving about


London; Dear Mr. Selby. Thank you for your letter, and to begin with, let me say that I am quite willing to speak at the lunch,


London; Dear Mr. Regnery. November will soon be here and I hope we shall be meeting. In September Miss Norton contacted me,


London; Dear Mr. Regnery. I have delayed answering you until my return from Leeds (where the Princess Royal - aunt of the Queen


London; My dear Dobree. Just a note to tell you how greatly I appreciate your part in the ceremonies at Leeds - not only your admirable speech


London; My dear Kahma. It is, I am ashamed to say, some months since I wrote you. Not long after our last exchange of letters,


London; My dear Ezz. Thanks for yours, and was glad to hear my letter had reached you. You say that Regnery has printed something


London; Dear Mr. Regnery. Enclosed is a letter dated 13 Nov. which my wife says was not typed at the time. That this should not have been done is very annoying:


London; Dear Mr. Wagner. First, A great many thanks for the flour and for the Crisco and even more for the other item.


London; My dear Allen. Should you be coming to London before long will you let me know - I mean if you had an hour or so to spare.


London; My dear Kahma. A parcel of great excellence has just arrived. We shall use one of the tins of butter to make a butter cake


London; Dear Miss Sturge Moore. As to the quotations from your father's text, I have no objection at all (of course) [Draft (dictated to another) has typed version in folder 52.]


London; Dear Miss Moore. Thank you very much for the book about your father. I shall see if I can review it in a suitable place.


London; Dear Mr. Regnery.Thank you for your letter, clippings, and the dust cover. It was very kind of you to write to "Time";


London; Dear Russell. Please cordially give permission to Ezra's friend, Drummond, to reproduce my drawing of Ezz


London; Dear Carter. My best of wishes for you on admirable article in Kenyon. Childermass and Human Age are being published


London; Dear Allen. Tuesday next 1 week, about five is suitable, and I shall be delighted to see you. [On verso AL[draft] to Melville Hardiment, Jan., 1953.]


London; Dear Kahma. Thank you for your New Year letter. It seems evident that the new year is going to be tough for you.


London; Dear Dorothy. I am sorry that the handkerchief we got with your name embarrassed you. It was very stupid of me.


London; Dear Mr. Rose. I am delighted to hear how soon we are to meet. My telephone number is Bayswater 2089.


London; Dear Mr. Carter. It is unfortunate, but I have no suitable material which I can send you. I shall have to write three thousand words before 17th April.


London; Dear Mr. Regnery. A bad influenza bowled me over for a while. Englands weather for a couple of months has been unusually bad


London; Dear Eliot. In September, I think it was, when I suggested dinner, you said the trouble was that your doctor was very strict


London; My dear Ayrton. I have written a "Rotting Hill" story for the American Magazine, called "The Rebellious Patient."


London; Dear Eliot. IThursday of next week, 7.30 if that suits you. Much looking forward to seeing you.


London; My dear Kahma. You say that you are able to see someone of consequence, who does not know you, about some reviewing job.


London; Dear White. Last week you evidently did not receive my message, asking you to telephone me on your return.


London; Dear Mr. Wagner. (1) What with Influenza and very extra heavy work my correspondence has been neglected. - First, I will now act


London; Dear White. When I came to see you the other day I am afraid I gave far too optimistic an account of what I shall need to finish


London; Dear Mr. Carter. Thank you for your letter, and for details about the special number. In your first letter to me you gave the twenty-nine of this month as a deadline,


London; Dear White. This morning I received your letter, which was a very great shock to me, from many points of view.


London; Dear Mrs. Cori. It was a pleasant surprise to hear of your visit to London. I suggest that we have dinner on Jun ..., at


London; Dear Mr. Weinsberg. Congratulations on the arrival on this earth of Naomi Weinsberg!


London; Dear White. I am in receipt of your letter of 30 April. You write that you will send me a cheque for one hundred pounds if I agree


London; Dear Allen. The Managing Director of Methuen has been away in Australia, and on Friday last I had my first inclusive talk with him


London; My dear Ayrton. I apologise for having been so silent. I was expelled for Spring Cleaning, and there have been other interferences.


London; Dear Mr. Carter. Thank you for the cheque for a hundred dollars. - I will sign the sheets if you will send them


London; Dear McLuhan. I received with great pleasure your letter, informing me of the position of the McLuhan colony (as it now is).


London; Dear Ayrton. Enclosed is my story. It is much longer than length asked for.


London; Dear Kingsley Martin. Here is the Edith Sitwell article


London; Dear Ayrton. I am very glad you like "The Rebellious Patient." The "Shenandoah", the College Magazine


London; Dear Mr. Carter. Thank you for agreeing to send me a copy of the proofs (you said about now,


London; Dear Mr. Regnery. Thank you for your letter. I thought England's advertisement of Monarchy


London; Dear Richards. I have written you at least three letters in the past nine months.


London; Dear White. Is there any chance of my getting the proofs of the novel soon?


London; Dear Ayrton.Many thanks for your letter. Am looking forward to your visit on Wednesday.


London; Dear Mr. Carter. Just back after short absence. You must excuse me, but this number of your magazine is about me,


London; Dear Mr. Carter. Your letter has just arrived, informing me that a typesetter has mutilated two or more


London; My dear Stuart Gilbert, Here is the information needed. - BOOKS. (1) Caliph's Design.


London; My dear Stuart Gilbert, Here is the information needed. - BOOKS. (1) Caliph's Design. [Typed copy of letter in folder 116.]


London; Dear White. I attempted to convery to you a short time ago, how necessary it was for me to have the proofs.


London; Dear Mr. Regnery. I have been having much trouble over my new novel.


London; Dear White. I am glad to learn that you are mailing my novel to Regnery - though everything, of course,


London; Dear White. I learn that you are leaving for your holiday on Friday. A short book on Extremism in the Visual Arts


London; Dear White. Here it is; it is all here except for (1) a few pages more in the conclusion and


London; My dear McLuhan. The complete page-proofs of the Shenandoah Magazine arrived here a few days ago;


London; Dear Mr. Carter. The page-proofs duly arrived, and I have now read the articles about my work.


London; Dear McLuhan. The page-proofs of the "Shenandoah" reached here a few days ago. [Typed version of letter in folder 3.]


London; Dear Mr. Regnery. The novel is, I suppose, now in your hands. That I was unable to send you a page-proof


London; My dear Allen. Some time, I hope you find it possible to get out here. You may remember


London; Dear White. The present situation, was forseen, in my last letter to you, you may recall.


London; Dear McLuhan. Eric Newton, and his expecially attrative wife, are doing a lecture-tour of Canada,


London; Dear Eric. Enclosed letters to "Editor, Standard, Montreal", and the Editor of "Saturday Night".


London; My dear Allen. We must have been writing to one another about the same time last Sunday.


London; My dear Ayrton. I have had a perfectly awful time for the past few weeks - though the pressure is abating.


London; Dear Handley-Read. I wonder if you are back in England? If so, will you apprise me of your presence


London; Dear Dr. McPherson. I wonder if you have returned from your holiday? If so, will you please let me know


London; Dear White. As soon as the typescript arrives you will, I understand, order the printing of my book.


London; My dear Allen. I hope White of Methuen has rearranged things to your perfect satisfaction?


London; My dear Spender. I was delighted to receive your letter. Enclosed is a Story of mine,


London; Dear Kenner. I have been rather long in writing to you because my wife received an injury to her arm.


London; My dear McLuhan. I will tell you, sometime later, how I come to feel it my duty to give Newton a leg up


London; My dear Spender. Your letter gave me the greatest pleasure. Also I am delighted to hear that it will appear so soon.


London; I am asking someone to leave this letter for you at your office, since it is urgent. It is not a good blurb


London; My dear Spender. Your cheque for fifty pounds arrived this morning - with the promise of more


London; Dear Allen. I was very glad to learn that the later date for the publication of your book was (even) welcome to you.


London; My dear Handley-Read. I wish you, and I hope your wife (who I am most anxious to meet) will come to tea


London; Dear White. Thank you for your letter. Walter Allen had, however, written me. I am very glad that he appears interested


London; Dear McLuhan. I have just received from Methuen the page-proofs (bound in the form of a book)


London; Dear McLuhan. A few minutes ago (Monday morning) Your book has arrived. Have read preface


London; My dear Spender. Enclosed is an American College Magazine "Shenandoah", with a complete number devoted mainly to my work.


London; Dear Allen. I enclose (i) U.S. College Magazine; (2) Kenner article torn out of Hudson,


London; Dear White. I have not quite enough Short Stories, I find, for the book I plan:


London; Dear Carter. At last 12 copies of Shenandoah have been extracted from the Customs


London; Dear Kenner. Your letter just arrived. I telephoned at once to Methuen. The Managing Director, White, read me a letter from Mac Gregor.


London; Dear Ezz. You have been doing your best to transform a late celebration into a 1914 (strictly pre-war) Blast. But how are you?


London; Dear Mr. Morgan. Thank you for your offer to publish in the Hudson Review something from the recently written book "Monstre Gai"


London; Dear Kenner. This is merely a few small things which I noticed in reading your typescript. At the same time,


London; Dear Eliot, I was shown a letter today of Ezra's to Miss Agnes Bedford, with whom he often corresponds. In it he expressed himself


London; Dear Mr. Morgan, Thank you for your offer to publish in the "Hudaon Review" something from the recently written book, [Typed copy of same letter in folder 34.]


London; Dear Kenner, This is merely a few small things which I noticed in reading your typescript [Typed copy of letter in folder 35.]


London; Dear Mr. Morgan. I feel extremely guilty about the few lines I should have written to supply a link between the first and the second pieces


London; Dear Mr. Morgan. You did get my packet of typescript ("Monstre Gai") didn't you? A quite


London; Dear Stuart Gilbert. Hail. Emerging from the debris of the past. You hear my voice again. I begin by saying good morning:


London; Dear Stuart Gilbert. Hail. Emerging from the debris of the past. You hear my voice again. I begin by saying good morning: [Typed copy of letter in folder 41.]


London; Dear Eliot. Thank you for your letter, and the copy of the lawyer's letter. Your departure for South Africa disposes for the time being


London; Dear Stuart Gilbert. Thank you very much for your letter. We here changed our plans during the holiday, and shall now come to Paris in April,


London; Dear Mr. Hansion[sic] I should of course like to have my book published again. Please ring me or if you like come out here


London; My dear Eliot. Thank you for your letter. I was delighted to hear that your piece for the Hudson will be ready in so short a time.


London; Dear Mr. Betts. I now supply you with the information I promised - how long was it ago? - and renew my apologies for the idiotic delay [Draft dictated to another.]


London; Dear Mr. Morgan. I was indeed delighted to learn that not only had the section of "Montre Gai" which I had sent you, been found acceptable,


London; Dear Kenner. Many thanks for your letter. I am glad that a chance offers to kill two birds with one stone - the hard-back and the soft-back


London; My dear Mc Luhan. Thank you for sending on the letter from the N. Y. publisher. But they have not approached me, and, on my side,


London; Dear Ayrton. Thank you for your letter. The Hotel, first and last, is the central feature of the book, and the death of the Hotel


London; Der Ashley Dukes. I was delighted to learn that I have so interesting a neighbour. Would it be possible for my wife and myself to come round


London; Dear Kahma. A month ago (about) I received a most friendly letter from you, and should long ago have written. But Christmas has been


London; Dear Dorothy. As you know, probably, Eliot left for South Africa. When he returns in March, I shall take up the subject again.


London; Dear Kenner. Thank you for so generously offering to take on my next novel, in addition to "The Vulgar Streak."


London; Dear McLuhan. Toronto, I assure you, is quite mistaken in anticipating an attack upon time to visit it and it is [undecipherable]


London; Dear Mr. Morgan. It has taken me a little longer than I expected to prepare the piece of "Monstre Gai." But I am sending it (Air Mail) tomorrow.


London; Dear Kenner. Three items, (1) Of course you have my permission to use the drawings of Joyce. (2) A agent here of a New York Publisher


London; Dear Spender. I cannot thank you enough for writing to people connected with the U. S. Funds. I am sorry that the Bollinger man is so discouraging.


London; Dear Agnes. I do not think that I can make much progress with one of my characters without having a talk or two with some anglo-catholic clergyman.


London; Dear Sir. I will begin by saying that I will consent to receive one hundred and fifty pounds on April the First, and also the income of my Civil List Pension


London; Dear Mr. Duell. I was delighted to hear from you again, and have at once air-mailed a page-proof copy of my book. I hope you like it.


London; Dear Hanison. Here is the Agreement. I consulted my lawyer, Field, Roscoe, about it. He asked to be allowed to blue pencil it,


London; Dear Father Young. Your letter was shown me by Agnes Bedford, and I was delighted to hear that you would be willing to help me


London; Dear Kenner. Thank you for your letter. Very disappointing about the unexpected uselessness of the soft-back trade.


London; Dear Kahma. Your proposal to migrate to London, England, must mean desperate conditions in Vancouver. I am a native (practically) of this ciety,


London; Dear and reverend. I was going to see that play with my wife, so your offer of seats in a box is very welcome. We will turn up ten minutes before the play begins.


London; My dear Russell. Enclosed is a copy of an article sent me by Kenner. He asked me to let you have a look at it.


London; My dear Allen. Thank you for your splendid review, especially the refroof with which you ended. As White (Methusen's) said they treated my book as


London; My dear Kenner. I am afraid that the U. S. is barred to me. It is very disgusting. You will be glad to hear that I received a letter from Methuen


London; Dear White. Thank you for your letter, with the good news. I am delighted to hear that things have gone so well as to necessitate a reprint.


London; Dear White. The Paris address of The Realite Nouvelle, The Seance Social is to be found, happily inside the Catalogue. Be careful to send your letter


London; My dear Eliot. I was particularly glad to receive your letter, with its remarks about my book. But what you tell me about your heart is bad news indeed.


London; My dear John. What you say about my book pleases me exceedingly. As always, your approval means a great deal more to me


London; Dear Mr. Morgan. Your letter arrived yesterday, informing me of the sections you have selected for publication, and how you are dividing those chosen into two parts.


London; Dear Mr. Morgan. In the course of conversation with T. S. Eliot he mentioned that you had asked him to write something


London; Dear Mr. Morgan. When your letter arrived, Eliot had already disappeared. He is in the Isle of Wight, for three weeks with his sister,


London; My dear Kenner. Thank you tremendously for your efforts re publishers. (1) We will await return of your friend to hear more


London; My dear Ruthen Todd. Thank you for what you said in your note about my book. I have received more than on unexpected letter of friendly import


London; My dear John. Forgive me for this very late answer, but all my time has been taken up with work. Thank you for Davenport's address,


London; Dear Campbell. I was glad to hear that South Africa was so pleasant. What I hear of the Belgian Congo makes me regret that in my wander jahren


London; Dear White. Here are two of the pictures for "The Demon of Progress in the Arts": (1) Portrait of Sir William Walton by Michael Ayrton.


London; Dear Eliot. The Monstre Gai is, of course, the Bailiff. He is the key figure in this book; in the next Lucifer Son of the Morning surpercedes him.


London; My dear Carter. Your letter which I should have received a week ago, has only just reached me. - I am very pleased and flattered by what you write


London; Dear Ashley Dukes. I hahve sampled your wonderful gift, the Perier Jouet, and I assure you that '42 is just as vigorous as '40!


London; Dear John. Thank you for the wonderful dinner the other night, and Tristran de Vere Cole was extremely kind in getting me into a taxi etc.


London; Dear Eliot. I wonder if you have been able to peruse my manuscript.


London;


London; Dear Mr. Morgan. Eliot has now read "Monstre Gai" two or three times, has spent about a month in Geneva, Switzerland,


London; Dear Mudrick. A billion apologise. Do not think that I have not written you; but it was just one of those accidents, in which a letter gets mislaid.


London; Dear Mr. Regnery. I was delighted to hear from you, and was most grateful for the cutting. Regarding "Self-Condemned."


London; Dear Mr. Morgan. I am at this moment, in receipt of your letter of Sept. 16. I had, sealed and ready for mailing a letter to you,


London; My dear Carter. So you are going up for your examination in mid-October; my best wishes - hope they will recognise that a soldier


London; Dear Miss Fields. The page number where the passage comes from which I quoted, is page 235, of Professor Stevenson's book.


London; Dear Kenner: What I call a "holiday" is ended and I am once more in harness. When I arrived here the other day I found your magnificent book,


[n.p.]; Dear Mrs. Liber. Am ariting this away from London - I have not your letter to refer to, but thank you for your stern action in the Book Center.


London; Dear Mr. Regnery. I was down in Mr. White's office yesterday, and I saw the point reached, in negotiations regarding "Self Condemned."


London; Dear Eliot. What you have written for the Hudson Review arrived at 4.30 yesterday. It will be of the greatest service to me.


London; Dear Eliot. Have you a copy of your note of Oct 9? What you say is quite accurate as regards what I wish to be understood;


London; Dear Mr. Morgan. Eliot sent me a rough draft of an article, which should be reacing you by air about the same time as this.


London; Dear Eliot. I am sorry I have been so long in writing you. But lewt me say now, before anything elsse, how very grateful I am to you


London; Dear White. As you know, my wife and I have an amateur helper. She is apt to blunder, and in this case did so badly.


London; Dear Mr. Newby. I returned to London this morning, and received your letter and Mr. Boswells at the same time.


London; Dear Mr. Boswell. I am in receipt of your letter of Nov. the first. I hope that you will agree to forty pounds rather than thirty


London; Dear Michael. Will be delighted to see you. Whenever you can pay me a visit. Telephone me, or write, when you are coming.


London; Dear Mr. Boswell. I have just written to Mr. Newby to tell him that I regretted not to have been able to agree terms with you,


London; Dear Mr. Hale. I am writing about "The Vulgar Streak." You do not I suppose, wish to put this book into circulation again.


London; Dear Mr. Newby. Your colleague, Mr. Boswell, wrote me offering me fees for my two talks which I found unacceptable.


London; Dear White. As you suggested, I appealed to Robert Hale, telling him that I had received an offer for "The Vulgar Streak".


London; Dear Mr. Newby. For the last ten days I have had influenza. I apologise for not answering your letter sooner.


London; Dear White. Encosed is the blurb, or a sketch of it, for "Monstre Gai" and "Malign Fiesta". Compress it or expand it as you think fit,


London; Dear Ezz. Your letter with approval of "Self-Condemned" gives me great pleasure. A constant stream of rumors reached me about you.


London; Dear White. In reply to your letter of December 1st, please take 10% on the Regnery business, and any other American sale in which we are


London; Dear Rebecca. Now for a letter which has been agitating in my consciousness for a long time. I will send you a book of six or seven hundred pages


London; Dear Mac Luhan. Un petit bonjour and how are you. Christmas is in the air here and there is no more to be said about London.


London; My dear Omar. It was with much satisfactionn that I heard the glorious news of your approaching marriage - and to a white woman.


London; Dear Bridson. I suppose that the preparation of Monstre Gai for broadcasting should start at once. The preparation of the dialogue


London; Dear Mr. Newby. I hope you will forgive me for the delay in answering. Thank you very much for the information about the genuine Delight of the Turks.


London; Dear Ruthen Todd. My delay in acknowledging your letter and cheque - for which I deeply apologise - was that I hoped to be able to answer you


London; Deara Omar. Have just been writing to Ezra, wishing him freedom in New Year. I next, hurl my blessings towards you, hoping that 1955 sees you seated


London; Dear Ezz. I greatly value your good opinion, so what you say about Self-Condemned gives great pleasure.


London; Dear Kenner. Thank you for the Joyce book, with the superb analysis at the end. It is one of your best undertakings, [Dicated by Lewis. The end of another dictated letter on the leaf too.]


London; Dear Rothenstein. It is most stirring to think that the Tate will exhibit my works, and I assure you


London; Dear Alan. I was extremely sorry to hear that your wife was in hospital. I hope that she will soon get over her trouble. [Lewis dictated to another.]


London; Dear White: Here is the new material - almost 1,000 words, I think. I am sending the entire second copy


London;


London; Dear Newby. First, let me thank you very much for the delightful New Year's present, the box of Turkish Delight


London; Dear Bridson. Many thanks for your letter, I now feel less alarmed. What you say about securing the best possible terms


London; Dear Miss Wakeham. Your letter reached me this morning, and the terms you outlined are agreeable to me.


London; Dear White. I have at last settled upon a title: "The Human Age." You remember that Samael's idea was to combine


London; Dear Mr. Inglis. Enclosed is the cheque for one hundred pounds which you suggested I should send you.


London; My dear Eliot. I knew I could not obtain, either from your office or from the London Clinic,


London; Dear Mr. Nowell-Smith. I enclose a copy of The Demon of Progress in the Arts. You have been misinformed,


London; Dear Miss Dyer: I return by air mail, the proofs forthwith - or, at least, six galley pages


London; Dear Mr. Morgan. Thank you for the cheque which I have just received. The copies of the Hudson Review


London; Dear White. Here are the first 80 galleys - the whole of Monstre Gai except a couple of Galleys


London; Dear White. Thank you for your letter about Michael Ayrton. It seems to me that he has resolved to limit himself


London; Dear Kenner. Since receiving your interesting letter my family have been searching the Shenandoah for the article


London; Dear McLuhan. For weeks I have been submerger - technicalities, or I should have answered you sooner.


London; Dear Mr. Morgan. This morning your letter arrived regarding Lawrences "Mint". I will obtain a copy


London; Dear Rothenstein. I believe I should have answered your letter. When you are ready I should be delighted to see you here,


London; Dear Docker. Thank you very much for the letter and cheque. As Agnes has no doubt told you, I have been busy


London; Dear Miss Backhouse. Thank you for the poems. I greatly enjoyed them. I will speak to one or two of my friends about them.


London; Dear Todd. You speak of the Ile de France. Does that mean you are coming over here?


London; My dear Naomi. I am sorry you can find nothing to say of my Demon of Progress. Except a lot of objections.


London; Dear White. I believe I have sufficiently thoroughly expurgated the text. Please examine it [Lewis dictated draft to another. With notes for book corrections]


London; Dear Khama. I owe you the most sincere apologies for not having answered you before. The fact is that since Christmas


London; Dear White. Here are various things from Ayrton. I think the dust cover and imprint are very excellent.


London; Dear Mr. Brown: Thank you very much for the two photographs; both, I think, are extremely successful. [Lewis dictated to another.]


London; Dear Rothenstein. I regret that my letter was not thought worth of an answer. Have however been offered the information


London; Dear Mr. Morgan. Here is the Col. Lawrence article. I do not know if you ever use photographs,


London; Dear White. Here is a facsimile, line by line, and word by work, of pages 268. 271. 282. 285. 288. and 289


London; Dear Augustus. First of all I have to apologise for not answering you sooner. The reason for that was the disorderly state


London; Dear Dr. Stein. I have been away, and only received your letter with the Hebrew words on my return.


London; Dear White. Enclosed is the awaited letter, from Dr. Stein. Is it any use attempting to make the printer print this word correctly? [Lewis dictated to another.]


London; Dear Mr. Clark. Please forgive me for having left your letter unaswered for so long. I much appreciate


London; Dear Mr. Hood. Mr. Alan White is expected back this week, when I will have a talk with him.


London; My dear Kenner. I learn that Alan White has sent page-proofs to Shenandoah, who in turn, has sent them to you


London; My dear Kirk. First of all, let me thank you very much for your interesting article in Yale Review.


London; Dear Mr. Regnery. I am very glad that Self Condemned has sold unexpectedly well.


London; Dear Mr. Roth-Limanowa. In reply to your letter of Sept. 8th, let me say, to start with, that I do not read German very easily;


London; Dear Kenner. I am very sorry indeed about the lateness of this letter. I have been obliged to cut everything out


London; Dear Mr. Morgan. For some weeks I have been finishing a big novel. To further this intensive work I have been hiding,


London; Dear Mr. Morgan. Thank you for your letter. My article was written more rapidly than I had thought,


London; Dear White: I received your note this morning, and here is the blurb you require. Improve it in any way [Lewis dictated to another.]


London; Dear Eliot. The news of your return - your safe return - reached me sometime ago, but I was completing a novel, and all my time was taken up by that.


London; Dear Eliot. I was sorry to hear that you had to go into a nursing home, even if it was only for 'Athlete's Foot". When was in America


London; My Dear Kahma. I apologise most sincerely at the long distance between this letter and my last, but think that henceforth I shall be able to correspond with more regularity.


London; My dear Kenner. I am delighted to learn from your last missive that your visit is now quite certain to occur.


London; My dear Russell Kirk. Thank you very much for the wonderfully good box of liqueur chocolates from Holland. How is your magazine going?


London; Dear Omar. Froanna went to Sotheby's the other morning to watch the sale of your Japanese prints. She will itemize the sales


London; Dear Lynette. Froanna and I were both delighted to hear from you, though very saddened to learn of your illness. [On verso is TL[copy} to [?] Rosdall, Dec.30, 1955.]


London; Dear Sir. A lot of venemas misunderstandings here been [?] and [?], one directed to yourself


London; Dear Docker. Thank you very much for the letter & cheque. As Agnes no doubt [Same as typed letter in folder 20, March 31, 1955]


London; ... Anyone resenting this outburst of my work should blame them, not me. I did not use my malign influence to inspire this miscarriage of justice [Lewis dictated to another.]


London; Dear White: enlcosed is the blurb, or a sketch of one, for "Monstre Gai" and "Malign Fiesta." [Same as TL[copy] version in Box 83, folder 111.]


London; Dear Docker. I am glad you listened to the Critics, I think they were friendly, which is going to help the book.


London; Dear Ezz. Your last letter undecipherable, just cannot imagine what lies beneath the words. Have you anything really to say?


London; Dear Kenner. I should be very glad if The Vulgar Streak found its way onto the U. S. Screen. Thank you very much for occupying yourself with that.


London; Dear Kenner. To begin with, many thanks for what you wrote in the poetry review. It will [?] said, against many American with One Way Song.


London; Dear Rothenstein. I have been ill for almost a week, and this has, among other things, prevented me from answering your two letters


London; Dear Alan. Thank you for the cheque and for your note accompanying latter. Another thank you for what you said about the delayed arrival of the advance.


London; Dear Mr. Van Sickle. I first heard enthusiastically, about you from Kahma, in Vancouver; and next from Michael. Now I have your Vaudeville upon my table,


London; Dear M. Wagner. My last published work was The Human Age. I have seen no review of yours in The Hudson nor do I indeed even know


London; Dear Alan. I had a sharp bout of illness last week. It has now passed. But I received your letter with wild enthusiasm.


London; Dear Bridson. Here are your instructions of 19th March. "Extra Scene One". This is a scene which could appear about page 86 in the novel.


London; Dear Naomi. I rad your "Chapel Perilous", and congratulate you. The Ghostly congregation from the churchyard was beautiful


London; Dear Ezz. Thank you for letter, some days or weeks ago. I prepare or help to prepare Rottenswine of the Tate a retrospective Show.


London; Dear Alan. Here is the stuff about The Childermass. I hope that it is more or less what you want. But perhaps by pulling it about a little you can make it so.


London; Dear Alan. I was glad to hear that we are going to be practically neighbours; and Froanna and I shall be delighted to visit you when you have settled in.


London; Dear Mrs. Gilliatt. I should be delighted to do the article you suggest - between 1,500 and 2,000 words. You will receive it not later than June 28th.


London; Dear Mr. Devine. I was very interested by your letter. I have often thought of the Theatre, but the business barriers have kept me from doing anything.


London; Dear Eliot. I was extremely concerned to hear of your Atlantic illness, but much relieved to learn that it was only just an alarming bout of the same disagreeable thing.


London; Dear Rothenstein. Thank youu for your letter of June 6. I must apologise for my delay on answering, but there has been a matter which has occupied all my time.


London; Dear Eliot. I was distressed to learn of the death of your sister. This will not, I hope, necessitate your return to America.


London; Dear Mr. James. Please excuse me for not answering you before about the pictures at the Tate. But actually I must keep the John Macleod for a while.


London; Dear Rothenstein. I was delighted to learn from the Times that you were going to have the portrait of Mrs. Sydney Schiff, and also Bagdad.


London; Dear Rothenstein. I was delighted to learn from the Times that you were going to have the portrait of Mrs. Sydney Schiff, and also Bagdad.


London; Dear Alan. My apologies for not having answered your letter much sooner. I was distressed at what you told me of the food poisoning of yourself and wife.


London; Dear Naomi. As the press-cuttings have shot me bits of your own dear composition, in Manchester paper, [Lewis dictated draft to another.]


London; Dear Ayrton. Thank you very much for your splendid design for Childermas. Am sending this tomorrow to White. [Lewis dictated draft to another.]


London; Dear Alan. Here are the Childermas proofs. There were a number of mistakes (printers errors) but I think they have all been spotted.


London; Dear Kenner. Thank you for the Joyce book, with the superb analysis at the end. It is one of your best undertakings, [Same letter as draft in folder 1.]


London; Dear Mrs. Gelhorn. I am terribly sorry to have missed seeing you during your visit to London. Your great kindness to me in St. Louis [Photostat included.]


London; Dear Ezra. I will willingly prepare the three essays about yourself which you want Peter Owen to use. But tell me which they are.


London; Dear Miss Chamot. The bearer of this note is Mrs. Margaret Neil. Will you please hand her the pastel of Father Murphy.


London; Dear Mrs. Neil. Thank you verymuch for the cheque and your appreciative letter. I think your plan for hanging the picture will give it a wonderfully good opportunity


London; Dear Ezz. Am awaiting your reply to my little note of a few days ago. Meanwhile Agnes has shown me your little note re an Quaderno.


London; Dear Alan. Do you see Observer? If not, enclosed will interest you. - Thank you for the copies of Red Priest. They look very well.


London; Dear Alan. Thank you for your letter, and I am indeed sorry to hear about your wife's precarious health. I know nothing about the condition


London; Dear Michael. Thank you for putting me in touch with Mr. Kissinger. I have written him air-mail agreeing to get him an article by Nov.1st.


London; Dear Alan. Thank you for your kind note. This mornings cuttings are more encouraging, are they not? I was very glad to hear about Sept. 16th,


London; Dear Bridson. Dorothy tells me that you will be back in three weeks. Meanwhile, Kenner is arriving on November the eighteenth.


London; My dear Kenner. Your letter reached me yesterday. Today is Tuesday, Sept.17th. I have already made arrangements for you


London; Dear Naomi. Thank you for opening my Exhibition. I would not think of feeding you with words. Tell the Public what your own experience of Art has been.


London; Dear Docker. First of all, thank you extremely for your generous gift. Next, I was very delighted by your reference to my novel.


London; My dear Alan. I was very shocked to hear from your secretary of the death of your wife. I hope you will understand how greatly I sympathise with you.


London; Dear Handley-Read. I have been a little ill, hence delay in answering. Your letter gave me great pleasure. I had always hoped that you would go


London; Could you come Tuesday to see me. Five before or after. Address at Tate. [Also note to Michael Ayrton. Both dictated by Lewis to another. On verso of invoice of Ernest Brown & Phillips


London; Dear Brown. I enclose a copy of a letter which I have just received. I do not think that I have anything to offer these people,


London; Dear Mr. Alexander. I much regret that I have nothing to offer you of the sort you want. Hoever, The Leicester Galleries have a number of my things


London; Dear Mr. Bledsoe. In reply to your letter of Dec. 31st, I should be very glad to do a preface for your edition of Time and Western Man.


London; Dear Mr. Carpenter. Thank you for your letter, and I would like to write something for you very much. I will at once read what you have sent me


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Mr. White has asked me to forward this permission request to you for your attention. [Signed Valerie Farrant]


Linwood, NY; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis: Your letter came just at the moment when I was starting on the long drive to central Ohio [Abbott is Director of Libraries at the University of Buffalo.]


Linwood, NY; Dear Mrs. Lewis: I have just been released from hospital where I have been for some weeks [Abbott is Director of Libraries at the University of Buffalo.]


Linwood, NY; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis: Your letter has just come down to me here and I am glad [Abbott is Director of Libraries at the University of Buffalo.]


Linwood, NY; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis: How very nice to hear from you so quickly, and to learn that you feel as I do [Abbott is Director of Libraries at the University of Buffalo.]


Linwood, NY; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis: Just this brief note to say that I am really delighted. I will write you later [Abbott is Director of Libraries at the University of Buffalo.]


Linwood, NY; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis: Again I am writing from home, on one of those days when I do not go up to Buffalo [Abbott is Director of Libraries at the University of Buffalo.]


Buffalo, NY; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis: It has been so long a time since I have heard from you that I begin to fear [Abbott is Director of Libraries at the University of Buffalo.]


Buffalo, NY; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis: I was relieved to have your letter but very sorry indeed to learn [Abbott is Director of Libraries at the University of Buffalo.]


Buffalo, NY; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis: There seems very little to say. I am sorry and I am disappointed. [Abbott is Director of Libraries at the University of Buffalo.]


Leigh-on-Sea; Dear Madam, re: "75, The Vineyards." We beg to inform you your cheque has been returned


Leigh-on-Sea; Dear Madam, re: "75, The Vineyards, Gt. Baddow" We do not appear to have heard from you


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis In case you are not at home when I ring your bell this evening - for I mean to drop this on you [On The Listener letterhead.]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis I am delighted you will do this. Since speaking to you, however, [On The Listener letterhead.]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis Here are cards - Paul Maze not included - and 2 galleys of your article. [On The Listener letterhead.]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis Herbert Read tells me you are in London, and I write to ask whether you could be persuaded to write an article[On The Listener letterhead.]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis Your article leaves space for a third illustration, which the editor would like [On The Listener letterhead.]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis Here are all the cards I possess. I can safely leave it to you [On The Listener letterhead.]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis I am just back from abroad I read at last for the first time your article


London; I see that "The Times" praises some Toulouse Lautrec drawings at the Marlborough Gallery [On The British Broadcasting Corp. letterhead.]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis Wd. you like to be the May exhibition for me? [On The Listener letterhead.]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis Yes, I wd. like your exhibition article this Friday please - and news of the picture you wd. like[On The Listener letterhead.]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis I need to say - & you can reply on Friday as I hope you'll do the Francis Bacon show for us [On The Listener letterhead.]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis In making my arrangements will you for your article, I forgot that Whitsun weekend approaches. [On The Listener letterhead.]


London; Dear Lewis May I just say how extra pleased I was with your article on Wadsworth. One gets so bored [On The Listener letterhead.]


London; Dear Lewis Why not do the July - last summer? shows for me? For issue of July 14 or 21 as you think fit[On The Listener letterhead.]


London; Dear Lewis Do you think I cd. have that promised article of yours by today week - Wed. Aug. 17?


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis No reports (a explorious gay kind) to report, I fear. Very sad, but thather as expected. [On The Listener letterhead.]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis Alas, I am now going to [?] & ask you. The Editor has decided that since the issue of the 13th carries a Book Supplement[On The Listener letterhead.]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis You said you wd. like to do the January exhibitions, so I send such cards as I find on my table [On The Listener letterhead.]


London; Dear W. L. I fear I cast unjustified aspursions on the motives of friend C. [On The Listener letterhead.]


London; Dear Lewis There is some doubt now about the April 20 which - Round the Galleries - I asked you to do, [On The Listener letterhead.]


London; Dear Lewis I am giving the June galleries to Robert Melville for a change. He used to do some work for me in the past, [On The Listener letterhead.]


London; Dear Lewis As you may know, we have had to sshut up shop, with most of the other weeklies, owing to the printers strike. [On The Listener letterhead.]


London; Dear Lewis I phoned you this morning, but too late to catch you. There simply isn't a glimmer of light at present [On The Listener letterhead.]


London; Dear Lewis You were so wonderfully good in the way you gave me your tragic news on Thursday that you enable me too to get easily through [On The Listener letterhead.]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis Thank you for the script. I will let you know what we think about it later. At the moment, I am not sure what to say. [On The Listener letterhead.]


London; Dear Lewis I'm awfully sorry this has been so long reaching you. It had to be held up at the printers until they had got ahead [On The Listener letterhead.]


London; Dear Lewis What about Augustus John's autobiography - "Chiarosuro". I think he calls it. Is it not an occasion for your to write [On The Listener letterhead.]


London; Dear Lewis Thank you very much for this. On reflection, I thought I wd. put it in the body of my Supplement. [On The Listener letterhead.]


London; Dear Lewis I am sorry to have vexed you. No one cares to be called "palty", so you push me to the explanation which it was my object to avoid, [On The Listener letterhead.]


Devon; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis Perhaps by now, two years since the publication of America and Cosmic Man - which I'm at present reading -


London; Dear Mr. Lewis Mr. Alfred Perles and I are editing a book on Henry Miller (letters, photographs etc). If you have any of his letters


Devon; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis Have you in your possession any letters from Henry Miller? Alfred Perles and I are editing a book on him


London; Dear Lewis, The light novel about which I spoke to you is now ready to be submitted to a publisher. It runs to about 90,000 words


London; Dear Lewis, It has just come to my knowledge that you are having serious difficulties with your sight. I am extremely sorry,


London; Dear Wyndham, I cannot resist adding my small voice to the great chorus of appreciation & gratitude which I know you will be receiving


Milan; Dear Sirs, Would you kindly send us a copy of: W. Lewis - "Malign Fiesta" W. Lewis - "Monstre Gai" [forwarded to G. Anne [Hoskyns] Lewis]


Dear Sir, I have had some trouble in trying to get the enclosed copy and the reproduction fee to Wyndham Lewis, the artist. [Signed Hilde Kurz]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, We are now working on a book on "English Fashion" by Alison Settle and I should like to include among the black-and-white illustrations your portrait


London; Dear Sir, Yourself & Grand Richards Ltd. Not having heard from you further in this matter, I conclude you have come to some arrangement with Messrs Grant Richards [With invoice from them to Lewis of 4 pounds, 4 pence


Hamburg; Sehr verehrte gnadige Frau, Wir hatten sehr gern in unserer T. S. Eliot-Monographie das Gemalde "Pound im Lehnstuhl" abgebildet. [Written for German publishers, Rowohlt Taschenbuch Verlag gmbh.]


Washington, D.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis: Thanks for your note, and forgive my tardiness--I had first to get hold of Huntington Cairns,


Wiesbaden; Dear Madam, The Tate Gallery advised me to write to you in the following matter: We are the publishers of the NEW HANDBOOK OF LITERARY SCIENCE [With copy of Lewis painting "Revolution"]


Weisbaden; Dear Sirs, The British Library advised us to write to you in the following matter: We are the publishers of the NEW HANDBOOK OF LITERARY SCIENCE


London; Dear Lewis, So sorry I couldn't get down yesterday - you know Hueffer's work takes up a good deal of my time these days


PHindhead, Surrey; Dear Lewis/ I have been messing around with the article ever since I came here but have got nothing done.


Padworth, Berks.; Dear Lewis, Thank you very much for sending me The Childermass. I have wanted very much to read it,


Padworth, Berks.; Dear Lewis, I was very glad to see you again, and hope we shall remain in touch. About the Times - what are your feelings?


Rome; Dear Lewis/ Your letter reached me here today, & I am replying at once, to say that I shall probably be away from England until early next June.


Paris; Dear Lewis, I wanted to send you a copy of the American edition of Death of a Hero, but unluckily the packets have gone somewhere in the French post.


Paris; Dear Lewis, There was some mess-up about your copy. I understood from Prentice that an advance copy was sent to you nearly a month ago.


Paris; Greatly touched and pleased by your telegram your approval is immensely important to me. Thank you


Paris; Dear Lewis, It is extremely generous of you to telegraph and write about the Hero, especially when you are so occupied.


Paris; Dear Lewis, Your article is excellent, and will be of the greatest assisance. I have posted a copy at one to the American publishers.


Rome; Dear Lewis, I have a note from Prentice, in which he asks if the superfluous Christian name can be lopped away from F.M.H.'s reference to you


Paris; My dear Lewis, Thank you very much for sending me your extremely pamphlet. What superb energy you have! I particularly like your remarks on satire,


London; Dear Lewis/ No sooner did I arrive in London that a posse of M.D.s incarcerated me in a nursing home under threat of I know not what collapse.


Lisbon; Dear Lewis/ I had a rotten time in London, & left as soon as the doctor allowed me to travel. I was very sorry not to see you


London; Dear Lewis/ Last night I got back here from Spain, and was delighted to find an inscribed copy of your poem among the things waiting for me.


London; Dear Lewis, I enclose with this the letter for Henry Church, to whom I have written at length about you. You will find them quite simple people,


London; My dear Lewis, For the past fortnight I have been in the grip of a sort of trench fever. I usually have a bout at this time of the year,


London; My dear Lewis, I wrote you a very hasty and inadequate note, but I was rather worried about Brigit. It seemed a case of food poisoning,


London; My dear Lewis, I was extremely glad to find you looking so much better and to hear that you have negotiated this rather awkward corner.


London; Dear Lewis, I've just turned up the enclosed map which may be useful to you. Yesterday I wrote rather hastily,


London; Dear Lewis, I got busy at once about the Heinemann affairs. The firm is a public company, with a nominal capital of 190,000 [pounds].


Mount St. George, Tobago; My dear Lewis, The above will be my address until about the end of June. It is a pleasant bungalow about 800 feet up,


London; My dear Lewis, How very nice to hear from you! Let us try to see something of each other. As always happens I have involved myself in a mess of fatiguing appointments,


Brodick, Isle of Arran; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, How kind of you to reply so promptly and sympathetically to my letter.


Brodick, Isle of Arran; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I am going to ask a great favor of you, and I hope that you will not be too annoyed at my troubling you.


Brodick, Isle of Arran; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I have received a very courteous letter from the Leicester Galleries, but they point out,


Brodick, Isle of Arran; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Once again I must apologize for troubling you, but I have been thinking things out during the past week.


Madrid; Reference: Author: Percy Wyndham Lewis; Title: THE REVENGE FOR LOVE/ We would like to consider for its publication in Spanish, in our: LITERATURE ALFAGUARA series


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, As you will see, whilst we were talking on the telephone yesterday, some reviews were already on their way to us. [Signed Philip Unwin]


Lydd, Kent; Dear Wyndham Lewis, A chill has prevented me from getting to London this week, but I shall be up next Thursday and Friday,


Lydd, Kent; Dear Mr. Lewis, Many thanks indeed for your letter. I shall be delighted to call on you next Wednesday at six; and I greatly look forward to meeting you.


Lydd, Kent; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Many thanks for your telegram. I shall be delighted to dine with you on Sunday the 24th -


Lydd, Kent; Dear Lewis, Many thanks for your letter. I am delighted to have a chance of writing a book on your work; and White gave me the terms I wanted


Exmouth, Devon; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Our letters must have crossed. I return the enclosed, which came this morning. I shall be very grateful for a copy


Exmouth, Devon; Dear Lewis, Many thanks for sending me Kenner's book, which I have now returned to White at Methuen's.


Lydd, Kent; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Many thanks for your letter. I am not certain at the moment when I shall next be in London


Exmouth, Devon; Dear Lewis, This is merely to let you know where I am now. The experts said Not Switzerland for my youngest child


Exmouth, Devon; Dear Lewis, Many thanks for your letter. I haven't forgotten our date, but have had to put off my visit to London


Exmouth, Devon; Dear Lewis, I shall be in London on Monday and Tuesday June 27 and 28th. I wonder whether I might invite myself round for tea


Exmouth, Devon; Dear Lewis, Many thanks for your telegram. I will be round at six o'clock on Monday.


Exmouth, Devon; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I hope at the end of next week to send off the usual letters to the press asking for letters, reminiscences and other information.


Exmouth, Devon; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Many thanks for your telegram. I'll come over to tea, then, next Wednesday, the 24th, at about four o'clock.


Esmouth, Devon; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I had lunch the other day with Alan White, who gave me your new address. I have been wondering how your collation


Exmouth, Devon; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Many thanks for your letter. I found it waiting for me when I got back from abroad yesterday -


Liverpool; Dear Mr. Lewis, I can not 'officially' confirm my intention to use the two extracts from ONE WAY SONG. Thank you for authorizing me to use them.


Liverpool; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I thought I had replied to your letter of December which contained the corrections to your earlier note on satire


Liverpool; Dear Sir, I have been asked to prepare a Penguin Anthology of Contemporary Verse (1918-1948) for publication in 1949,


Liverpool; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I am not a professor, merely a lecturer. It means I'm paid less, in fact badly, but that I do not have to squander the leisure


Avon, Ct.; Dear Mr. Lewis: Your letter of the 21st, addressed to Joe, was opened by me. Joe started for India as a member of the Intelligence Service of the Navy.


Cambridge, MA.; Dear Mr. Lewis: I've just seen Ted Spencer, & 2 [?] everythings arranged if you can [?] at me beginning of next week


Washington, D.C.; Dear Lewis, Returning from a short absence from Washington, I was delighted to find a whole series of communications from you,


Washington, D.C.; Alas, have unbreakable engagement to leave town for weekend but can not you reach here soon enough for lunch Friday


New York; Dear Dr. Valentiner: The American British Art Center is holding the first one man exhibition of sculputre by Mitzi Solomon, [Signed Ala Story]


Cleveland, OH; Dear Mr. Lewis: You name has been suggested by Dr. Geoffrey Wagner as one who will be interested in the work of the American Society for Aesthetics. [Signed John F. White]


Zurich; [Calling card of Prof. Dr. Marc Amsler, phone number written in pencil on back.]


Toronto; Dear Mr. Lewis, Not having heard from you for some time we phoned your old address [Signed Edward J. Beatie]


London; Dear Sir, While personally quite indifferent as to the abolition or retention of the Royal Academy,


Eton, Windsor; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, I write a little while ago to ask if I might have permission to reproduce the portrait of Edith Sitwell


New Haven, CT; Dear Mr. Lewis, I am an undergraduate here at Yale. For a number of years I have been living in Italy


Toronto; Merry Christmas. Mrs. Lewis [Christmas card.]


Toronto; Dear Mrs. Lewis,


Toronto; Dear Mrs. Lewis, How can I thank you for the happy influence you have had on my life? [Includes hand drawn map of Toronto, indicating location of York University.]


Toronto; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Your letter of two months ago gave us great pleasure and still does.


Toronto; Dear Mrs. Lewis, It doesn't seem possible that one week ago we were having tea with you.


Toronto; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Hello, and how are you? Hope you have had a pleasant Christmas, though I am sure all this business of devaluation


Toronto; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Thank you ever so much for your letter and cosent to do the bibliography.


Toronto; Have received fifteen pictures letter follows.


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I am delighted that we are going to have an opportunity of publishing [Signed Denys Sutton]


London; Fifty Years of Painting [Remittance Advice]


Mamaroneck, NY; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis: Please have your friend, Mrs. Hirst, call at the Hotel Diplomat for your luggage.


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Aquarius, London Weekend Television's Arts Magazine programme, is shortly to screen a feature programme [Signed Nigel Finch]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I wrote to you last February in the hope that you would be willing to contribute your opinion [Signed J. M. Richards]


London; Dear Sirs, We are interested in reprinting APES OF GOD by Wyndham Lewis and I understand that you control the rights [Signed Bernard Hanison]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, We are interested in bringing forth a new edition of your novel APES OF GOD. Mr. White of Methuen advised [Signed Bernard Hanison]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Please forgive me for not writing to you sooner. I should like to reprint APES OF GOD in a special limited edition, [Signed Bernard Hanison]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I am sorry to be so long in delivery of the draft agreement enclosed herewith, but have had such pressure of work [Signed Bernard Hanison]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Thanks for the agreement for APES OF GOD with your comments. It has been retyped [Signed Bernard Hanison]


London; Dear Michael Ayrton, Thank you for coming to see me today. On reflection we have decided that 15 guineas is the limit [Signed Bernard Hanison]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I wonder if you have theintroduction ready for APES OF GOD? I can't put the book into production until I have this [Signed Bernard Hanison]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Thank you very much for the preface to the new edition of THE APES OF GOD. Of course, I think this is first class. [Signed Bernard Hanison]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Here's a rough pull of the contents page and page for numbering and signing of APES OF GOD. [Signed Bernard Hanison]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Here's the proof of the jacket of APES OF GOD. The colour is not quite right, but this will be corrected. [Signed Bernard Hanison]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Can I come along and collect the dummy book of APES OF GOD this week? Also, will the insets be ready? [Signed Bernard Hanison]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis, I should like to thank you for your kind review of my book included in your "Perspective on Lawrence"


Farnham Common, near Slough; My dear Lewis, Just a line to thank you for a grand and most exhilerating evening. I liked Porteus very much indeed,


Farnham Common, near Slough; My dear Lewis, I understand from Geoffrey Grigson that you are back in London; and back too in the old village of Bayswater.


New York; Gentlemen: We are planning a series of reprints of magazines, catalogs and other documents pertaining to modern art movements


[n.p.] Dear Mrs. Lewis: The following is our entire understanding: 1. As the sole owner of all the reprint rights to all the issues of BLAST magazine [Agreement of understanding]


London; Dear Sirs, In the Autumn of this year we shall be publishing "Modern English Structure" by Barbara M. H. Strang, [Dictated by E. A. Hamilton and signed by Anne Gilchoist in his absence.]


Milan; Dear Mrs. Wyndham, We wrote to the Tate Gallery asking the permission to reproduce the photo of the picture "The Surender of Barcelona" [Signed Massim Gualtieri]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis, I have been ill but if you would come to my apartment, 66 East 56 St., on Thursday [Signed Florence Codman]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis, I went away, as I planned, but contrary to plan I was sent to bed again. As soon as I am about I shall let you hear from me [Signed Florence Codman]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis, The chief trend of my thought has been along the lines I pointed out when I talked to you. [Signed Florence Codman]


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, I have requested permission from the Tate Gallery to reproduce paintings by your husband. The one of Edith Sitwell [Signed Charles Spencer


Montreal; Dear Mr. Lewis: - Thank you for your note and the address and telephone number. I only wish to assure your that if we can be helpful [Signed W. A. Griffiths]


Chicago; Dear Mr. Lewis: I have your letter of recent date. I shall be glad to tell Mr. Stifler of your ability and reputation [Signed Daniel Catton Rich]


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Mr. Gerald Marks is writing a series of articles for our magazine THE ARTIST on "Design in Painting" [Signed Vivien M. Price]


Toronto; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Here is a copy of a letter which we received today from the Tate Gallery regarding reproduction of "The Surrender of Barcelona" [ Signed Sirley Gibson]


Chicago; My dear Mr. Lewis: We have heard from Dr. W. R. Valentiner of Detroit that you will be coming through Chical to St. Louis [Signed Rue W. Shaw]


Chicago; My dear Mr. Lewis: Your letter of January 23rd and telegram of the 25th are received and we are glad to hear that you can arrange [Signed Rue W. Shaw]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I am writing to convey to you my Council's most sincere thanks for you [r] great kindness in lending [Signed Philip James]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I wonder whether you would be so good as now to return me the book on the Visual Arts, [Signed Philip James]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I enclose herewith details of a limited competition for paintings to be purchased by the Arts Council [Signed Philip James]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I am wondering whether two previous letters which I have sent you converying my Council's invitation [Signed Philip James]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, "Wyndahm Lewis and the Vorticists" After consultation with the Tate Gallery we have decided to try [Signed Philip James]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, "Wyndham Lewis and Vorticism" We have now made definite plans to tour a selection from this exhibition [Signed J. W. Palmer]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you for your letter of 1st July to Mr. Philip James who is at present away in Russia. [Signed Joanna Drew]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I am writing to thank you and your wife for kindly agreeing to extend the loan of your two drawings [Signed Philip James]


London; Dear Madam, Thank you for your letter, received on 25th June, which was addressed to the Chairman [Signed Gabriel White]


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Would you have any objection to our making a reproduction of "Inca with Birds", to be sold by the Arts Council? [Signed Karen Amiel in the absence of Norbert Lynton.]


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, VORTICISM AND ITS ALLIES Thank you very much for your letter in reply to our request for permission to reproduce [Signed Robin Campbell]


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, I have pleasure in enclosing a cheque for 50 (pounds) as your reproduction fee


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, We hope you received safely your 50 (pound) reproduction fee.


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, TIME AND WESTERN MAN. With reference to my letter of 22nd November, 1966,


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, SELF-CONDEMNED, by Wyndham Lewis. I have recently had a permission request from William Heinemann


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, SELF-CONDEMNED, by Wyndham Lewis. Thank you for your letter of 27th February, 1967.


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you very much for your letter of the 2nd March. I have now written to William Heinemann


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, ROTTING HILLS, by Wyndham Lewis. I have received a request from Librairie Armand Colin for permission


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, BLASTING AND BOMBARDERING, by Wyndham Lewis. We have received a request [With about 75 other letters asking Mrs. Lewis for permission to use one of Lewis' works.]


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, I am afraid we have had very disappointing news about L'Herne,


London; Dear Professor Conron, ESTATE OF WYNDHAM LEWIS. Thank you for your enquiry. The rights in this book


London; [Royalty Statement for "The Lion & the Fox"]


[n.p.] Dear Sir or Madam: In order to avoid the withholding of any moneys in this country for United States income taxes,


Boston; Dear Bill: I am sorry not to be better pleased with this paper by Wyndham Lewis. Parts of it are very engaging, [Signed Edward Weeks]


Boston; Dear Mr. Lewis:-- I hear from good friends of the "Atlandtic" that you are living in Toronto [Signed Edward Weeks]


Boston; Dear Mr. Lewis: I find much to applaud in both of these essays of yours. Your appraisal of American democracy [Signed Edward Weeks]


London; Dear Sir, In collaboration with the Central Institute of Art and Design we are publishing a further volume [Signed Eileen J. Smith]


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, We should like it so much if you and your husband could really be persuaded to come here for a few days.


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Mrs. Lewis, August 27th to 30th would be excellent for us if you find you can manage it. Please come & Stay in the house:


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Mrs. Lewis. We were so very sorry to hear this morning about your husband. I don't think there is anyone left of his stature.


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Mrs. Lewis. This is just to say that of course an invitation holds good for any time when you can get away & would care to do so.


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Replying to your letter to Michael, he asks me to say that he had sold: Pen drawing of yourself smoking a cigarette


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Mrs. Lewis. We do both hope you are better. Look after yourself: this year's influenza is not at all nice.


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I am replying to your letter to Michael, as he is working on a rush job at present. We both sympathise very much with what you say.


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Mrs. Lewis. I'm sorry to have been so long in answering your letter we have been away and Michael is now in Edinburgh making lithographs.


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Mrs. Lewis. Michael & I are both delighted to hear that you have sold all the drawings. He asks me to say that they are in London


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. My contact in Paris sends the enclosed catalogue and I send on his letter with it.


Toppesfield, Essex; Michael Ayrton requests the honour of your company at a private view, on March 6, 1947 of his recent paintings


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. I am tremendously pleased with the catalogue forward, indeed I am very proud that you should have felt inclined to write


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis. Two years ago you wrote the introduction to the catalogue of my last exhibition at the Redfern Gallery


Toppesfield, Essex; My Dear Wyndham Lewis. I was greatly encouraged by your telegram although I am afraid that ['Tidalwaters'?], the radiotic programme


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. My editor is delighted with the 'Rebellion Patient' and wishes to publish it. He has asked the publishers


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. When we spoke on the telephone a few weeks ago, you mentioned that the visual arts no longer concered you,


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. I am so sorry not to have acknowledged your telegram before this but I have been in a welter of work


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. Thank you so much for your letter. Actually if it makes no difference to you Thursday the 26 would suit us better.


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. Thank you so much for your letter. I look forward keenly to your article. I think we may agree that Lady Herbert has overdone it


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. Just a line to say that we await your article with the greatest interest and that the editor of the publication in question


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. Thank you for your letter. I look forward very much to receiving your short story and I will see to it that the fee is paid at once.


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. Thank you very much for the M.S. received this morning. I have read it with great enthusiasm and passed it on


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. I have now heard from the editor of 'Book of the Year' that he is enthusiastic about your story -


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. I think the Rebellious Patient is absolutely superb. It has the especial quality of describing to the reader a course of action


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. My wife and I will be in London nex Wednesday, July 15 and we wonder if we may accept your invitation to come and see you


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. Thank you so much for your letter. We were both very disappointed not to be able to welcome you here


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. After prolonged and increasingly furious correspondence and a number of abusive telephone calls I have at last obtained satisfaction


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. I had intended visiting you last week but I have had a very heavy cold for ten days, which I cannot seem to throw


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham. Thank you so much for the proofs of 'The Apes of God' jacket. I am sorry about the B.B.C. talks proposal. I have heard nothing more


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. I received your message and have since tried tree times to telephone to you but I presume you must be away [With draft reply from Lewis on it.]


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. I have read 'Self-Condemned' with the greatest excitement and second time with the greatest care and I find it


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. I have completed the jacket for Self Condemned after four attempts and five days work and I think I have done a reasonable job.


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. I have seen Mr. hanison of A.R.C.O. about the jacket for Apes of God but I am afraid the interview was not a success.


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. Herewith the Walton photo. I have written to Minton for a Thames painting. I also enclose the article about M. Mathieu


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. I shall have completed a jacket for The Apes of God this weekend and should like to bring it to you next week


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. Thank you for the cheque. Our friend in Fitzroy Street is certainly a curious figure. Let us hope the jacket turns out


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. I have received the new book and read it at once. I hail it with a fierce shout for what you have said needed saying badly


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. Thank you for your letter with the type sample and the Methuen letter enclosed. I have had no word from Methuen


Toppesfield, Essex; My Dear Wyndham. I enclose the ICA pamphlet with their little reply to you. Not very strong I think. May I visit you at 4 pm instead of 5 pm on the 15.


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham. I saw White of Methuen on Thursday and all is satisfactorily arranged apropos the drawings for Monstre Gai and Malign Fiesta.


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. I have been intending to get in touch with you for some weeks but paradoxically I have been so involved with you


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. We are back from Spain and if I may I should like to call on you on Monday week and collect the portrait.


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Lewis. I have had a letter from "The Shenandoah" asking me to write an essay on the subject of working with you on The Human Age designs


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. I enclose a copy of the piece I have written for the Shenandoah on my association with you. I sent it with some trepidation


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. I wish to send you the catalogue of my show and to apologise for having neglected to make contact with you during the last few weeks.


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Lewis. Thank you for your wire. The show has gone - or is going - tolerably well despite the violet antagonism of the I.C.A.


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Lewis. I had meant to call on you last week but have been confined to bed with a violet bronchitis and flu and only just up.


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. I send you herewith a design for the jacket of The Human Age which I hope you will find suitable.


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. I have just received from Methuen's the proof of The Red Priest which I am reading with enthusiasm and excitement.


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. Thank you so much for your telegram. I'm glad you like my little piece in the 'Statesman', as opportunity to write,


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Wyndham Lewis. In great haste I write to enclose a letter from Henry Kissinger, the editor of Confluence, which will explain itself.


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Lewis. Yes, I was sent a copy of Robert's pamphlet which I assume he had printed at his own expense. He clearly has no talent


Toppesfield, Essex; My Dear Lewis. White has just sent me your introduction oto my book of essays and I write at once to thank you and to say that I am very proud


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Mrs. Lewis. I will not burden you with conventional messages of regret, but in more practical rein, ask if you would care to come and stay awhile down here,


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Mrs. Lewis. The Zwemmer show is a complet surprise to me too, nor have I yet seen it, but I suppose he owns the works


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Mrs. Lewis. Thank you for your letter and for returning the material but please keep the catalogue since I have other copies


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Mrs. Lewis. We could call on you this Thursday afternoon at about 4.30 pm if that would be convenient. We should both very much like to see you.


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Mrs. Lewis. I have read the New Statesman but have not as yet been able to lay hands on the relevent copies of the T.L.S.


Toppesfield, Essex; Have also replied times your letter first rate have sent it


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Mrs. Lewis. I have visited you with my wife. I have not as yet posted your letter to the T.L.S. as a result of a conversation with Sir John R.


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Mrs. Lewis. Here is a proof of my letter to the T.L.S. I hope you will approve. It will appear shortly, I am assured.


Toppesfield, Essex; ... substantial part of theis collection does not show him at the top of his form. We both know that. Nevertheless, there are sufficient drawings of high quality


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Mrs. Lewis. Due to the editory of a magazine called 'Spectrum' published in California which (as the 'Shenandoah' its old name) has published a good deal


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Mrs. Lewis. I am sorry that you do not see your way to accepting Russell's offer as it seemed to me that it would be very difficult


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Mrs. Lewis. I am very sorry you aren't well and hope you will soon be better. I have no doubt that this worry has had something to do with it.


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Mrs. Lewis. I have just returned from Scotland and received your second letter concerning Peter Russell's failure to pursue the matter of his offer


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Mrs. Lewis. I do not know where the concweption originated that I was trying to sell the drawings in the U.S.A. for 500 dollars.


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Mrs. Lewis. Peter Russell has just written to apologise for his long silence and to say that he is now prepared to go ahead and buy the drawings


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Mrs. Lewis. Pending any news of Russell I have risked selling another drawing for you. It is a stong pencil work head of a dark woman inscribed 'Boston. 1936'


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Mrs. Lewis. We will put the whole matter in the hands of my solicitors and see what they say. If they think Russell would go back


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Mrs. Lewis. Thank you for your letter with enclosure for the Times Literary Supplement. I am extremely sympathetic with all you say,


Toppesfield, Essex; Dear Mrs. Lewis. Thank you for your letter. I have had others, including one from Walter Michel in New York, about the N.S. exchange with Melville


Rapallo; My dear Mr. Lewis, Mr. Pound has written asking us to lend the 4 drawings which we have for a retrospecting exhibition.


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Billy Feast gave me your address and I would like to come and see you. I work until 5.30 and the phone number is


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, I have held our cheque there few days in order to confirm the sale of the last 2 copies we had of The Apes of God.


Birmingham; Dear MRS. LEWIS; As you are a user of our shade retainers, we are taking the liberty of enclosing herewith a few of our leaflets


London; My dear Lewis. I hope that you have not got a severe attack of flu. Yesterday my feet were very swollen and towards evening caused me more pain


Bucharest; My dear Lewis. I was delighted to hear from you but you do not mention the exhibition Blast no.2 or Etchell. I feel reassured and await the downfall of Germany


Bucharest; My dear Lewis. A fellow from the legation is going to Sweden via Petrograd so I am sending you a line. How did the exhibition go off.


Bath; My dear fellow. This is a lugubrous spot. An expansive dingy series of rooms: after my gay room. Develish cold too in morning.


Bath; Many thanks for letter & telegram. They don't want me to go to town. Apparently you are having colder weather than we are.


Bath; My dear Lewis. I hope you have not heard all these fefore (1) There was a young girl of Penzance. In a bus she fell down in a trance. Ten passengers fucker her, Likewise the conductor, And the driver came twice in his pants.


Bath; My dear Lewis. I had hopes of coming to town but the matron refused to listen to my suggestion. My life runs on prescribed lines.


Baltimore; Dear Miss Moir: Thank you for thinging of the Museum in connection with Mr. Wyndham Lewis. Our lecturers here at the Museum are invited always in connections with exhibitions.


Washington; Your application for pension under Act of June 27, 1850, has been received and placed on file in the Pension Bureau.


Washington; Dear Sir:- Your application for pension under Act of June 27, 1890 has been received and filed in the Department.


Torquay; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you very much for your kind letter. It is interesting to hear also about the introduction to Martin's


Annandale-on-Hudson; Dear Mr. Lewis: Mr. Theodore Weiss has just turned over to me your letter of April 19. [Signed Edward C. Fuller]


Annandale-on-Hudson; Dear Mr. Lewis: I regret that the rush of activities which always attends the closing of a college semester


London; Cher Monsieu, Je ne puis mi explique, votre silence? Vous m'avez promis de faire la carte postale


Hove, Sussex; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, It is with even greater diffidence now that you know what I perpetrated in the Herald.


London; Dear Sir, re Pinker & Sons. With reference to your call here last evening, herewith we enclose a copy of a letter [With copy of the letter mentioned in Aug.28 letter to Lewis; second letter to Lewis dated Aug.30, 1930, with copy of letter mentioned; and copy of Aug.14, 1930 letter to Lewis.


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, re Pinker & Son. I enclose a copy of a letter received this morning from the above in which the sole blame is put upon the United States Customs. [Signed H.D. Barnes]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Late this afternoon Messrs. Walker Martineau & Co. Solicitors of 36 Theobalds Road, who act for Messrs. Chatto & Windus rang me up [Signed H.D. Barnes]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Messrs. Walker Martineau have just telephoned to ask whether you will let them have the necessary words in substitution [Signed H.D. Barnes]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Many thanks for your letter which has just reached me. I have sent a copy of it to Messrs. Walker Martineau [Signed H.D. Barnes]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, re Doom of Youth. I enclose a copy of a letter we have this morning received from Messrs. Walker Martineau & Co. [Signed H.D. Barnes]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I enclose a copy of a letter received from Messrs. Walker Martineau & Co. and a copy of my covering letter addressed to you [Signed H.D. Barnes]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, re DOOM OF YOUTH. In answer to very repeated requests, at the earliest possible moment after 6 p.m. today I went round and saw Messrs. Walker Martineau, [Signed H.D. Barnes]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Yourself & anr ats Waugh. We have just now (5.20 p.m.) received a letter from Messrs. Rubinstein Nash & Co. [Signed H.D. Barnes]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, re WAUGH. As desired by Mr. David, I wrote this morning to Rubinstein Nash & Co. asking for Waugh's affidavit [Signed H.D. Barnes]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Yourself ats Waugh. I have this morning received Waugh's affidavit, a copy of which I enclose. [Signed H.D. Barnes]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Yourself ats Waugh. I have just received and now enclose a copy of your proposed Affidavit as settled by Counsel.[Signed H.D. Barnes]


London;Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis. Yourself ats Waugh. Counsel has just rang me up regarding your suggested amendment to your Affidavit [Signed H.D. Barnes]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis. First of all I congratulate you on the happy termination of the Imterim proceedings before the Judge in Chambers this morning. [Signed H.D. Barnes]


London;Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I enclose copy of a letter we have this morning received from Messrs. Walker Martineau & Co. I have formally acknowledge receipt of it [Signed H.D. Barnes]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis. Many thanks for your letters of Wednesday and Thursday last, which I received on Friday with your "naked" suggestions for replying[Signed H.D. Barnes. With copy of a draft to Walker, Martineau & Co. re Doom of Youth.]


London;Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Yourself and Lady Glenapp. We have this morning heard from the Plaintiff's Solicitors that they have received instructions to proceed [Signed H.D. Barnes]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Many thanks for your telegram giving me your address as above, and I now confirm my reply dispatched to you[Signed H.D. Barnes]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Yourself ats Lady Glenapp. We have today received a letter from Messrs. Burton, Yeates & Hart [Signed H.D. Barnes]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Very many thanks for so kindly sending me a card for your exhibition of drawings which I hope to avail myself of [Signed H.D. Barnes]


London; Dear Sir, Yourself & Anor ats Waugh. We duly attended today the hearing of the Summons for Directions herein wihen the Master ordered Statement of Claim [Signed Damon Butler]


London; Dear Sir, Yourself and Winn. We have received a letter from Messrs. Gisborne & Co. who are acting for Mr. Godfrey Winn, [Signed Damon Butler]


London; Dear Sir, Yourself & Anor ats Waugh. We have daily been expecting you to call to enable us to settle the various points raised when last we had the pleasure of seeing you [Signed Damon Butler]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you for your letter of yesterday's date, which I think accurately represents the position. [Signed H.D. Barnes]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Herewith I enclose a letter in answer to the one you handed to me yesterday, which I trust will meet your purpose. [Signed H.D. Barnes]


London; My dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I duly received your telephone message and having corrected some clerical mistakes, have duly written Messrs. Walker, martineau & Co. [Signed H.D. Barnes]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Since seeing you this evening, I have had an opportunity of telling my partner what transpired when I saw Mr. O'Hagan privately [Signed H.D. Barnes]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham-Lewis, As I told you this morning, once we have started a case we most emphatically like to see it through [Signed A.W.N[?]]


London; Dear Sir, Messrs. Walker, Martineau have again telephoned to us this afternoon desiring to know whether we have yet receieved instructions [Signed Butler]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I have your letter enclosing the writ. As I told you on the telephone, there are eight days before an appearance need be entered [Signed A. W. N[?]]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Ihave your letter of yesterday's date. Let me first of all say that we have adhered absolutely to the arrangement come to, [Signed H.D. Barnes]


London; Sear Sir, re Income Tax. With reference to our conversation with you with regard to this matter some days back, when you promised [Signed Butler; with TL to Barnes & Butler from the Inspector of Taxes, 1st November, 1932.]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, YOURSELF ats CHATTO & WINDUS. Barnes tells me that when he spoke to Messrs Walker Martineau & Co. the other day [Signed A.W. N[?]]


London; Dear Sirs, Mr. Wyndham Lewis & Mr. Godfrey Winn re "Doom of Youth". With reference to our letter to you of the 6th inst.


London; Dear Sirs, Wyndham Lewis ats Waugh. With reference to your letter of the 2nd inst. Our Client is astonished that such a preposterous interpretation


London; Dear Sirs, WYNDHAM LEWIS ats WAUGH. We beg to acknowledge receipt of your letter of even date and thank you for the information


London; Dear Sirs, Wyndham Lewis & Ors. ats Waugh. We thank you for your letter of yesterday's date informing us that Summons herein has been restored for hearing


London; Dear Sirs, re DOOM OF YOUTH. We have now obtained our client's instructions regarding the letter you handed last night to our Mr. Barnes.


London; Dear Sirs, re Doom of Youth. Counsel has now had the necessary leisure to enable him to study the above and has advised that in his opinion


London; Dear Sirs, "Doom of Youth", Wyndham Lewis and Chatto & Windus ats Waugh. With furth reference to your letter of the 19th inst. our instructions are to contest this action


London; Dear Sirs, "DOOM OF YOUTH". We beg to acknowledge receipt of your letter of yesterday's date, and thank you for the information therein contained.


London; Dear Sirs, Our Client, Mr. Wyndham Lewis, has handed to us a letter dated the 8th October which we enclose. We understand our client has answered this letter


London; Dear Madam, I am writing to inform you that I have used the following words in a song-cycle that I have composed: "Jig for sackbuts". Timothy shy - in the "News Chronicle."


London; Dear Ann, My gloves are simply gorgeous and they fit me perfectly. I have never had such truly elegant gloves and flank ones were just what I needed.


London; Dear Ann, Through your publisher, Methuen, I was able to get your address so I could write you that Anita died, after a long illness, on October 29th.


New York [Xerox copies of all the Iris Barry letters in the Lewis papers. Actual letter follow in this guide.]


London; ...I am rather ill with tonsilitis and 4 sleepless nights much pain & long slow days. Will you come to see me? I shall not be infectious now [probably around 1920?]


London; Dear W.L. Many thanks for letter & enclosure, also for telephoning. The 30\- you sen was for last week, was it not, Nov.5th to 12th: [probably about November, 1921?]


London; Dear W.L. I'm dying of sixteen pulmonary compaints and am going down to Mill Hill for the week-end - I think I have sold that story I told you of.[probably about 1921?]


London; Dear Lewis. Sadleir writes that "Mr. Withersquash" is about to appear. When it does, please put in a good word for it where you can. [[probably about 1923?]


London; Dear W.L. I popped around on Monday night but the gate was locked. Are you in London? If so give me a line, or phone, won't you? [probably about 1922/23?]


London; Dear W.L. I called on spec. to try & borrow a few shillings as I only have 8 1/2 & haven't paid for Maisie. There have been complications with Constable, [probably about 1922/23?]


London; Dear W.L. I am going down to see Maisie next Sunday. I suppose you don't want to come -do if you can. Try & fix an evening for a meeting [probably about 1922/23?]


London; [Calling card, used sometime ca. 1926/1929]


London;I cannot believe that you are in the Land of the living, and I have some horrible idea that you are also at Liverpool, or New Haven or Stockholm. ["Wednesday" around Dec., 1920?]


Paris; It was sad not seeing you in Paris, you might have spared me five quick minutes for one small drink - As to the studio let me know how much you want to pay [probably about summer, 1921?]


London; Dear W.L. Thank you for cheque received this morning - I don't quite know how I'm going to cash it as it is crossed but will try. [probably around late in 1921?]


London; My dear Lewis. How are things? I'm getting a little restive once more - not having heard from you. On the other hand, I was quite willing to wait [probably around late in 1921?]


London; I wish I owed you 50 [pounds] as I do Mr. Selfridge, then perhaps you would write to me as often as he does. Marie is here; your chum Mr. E. [pound sign] has written [probably around late in 1921?]


London; Dearest Lewis. It was nice to hear from you - the novel is being sent today, now that I know it will reach you. Perhaps you'll ring me up [probably around March, 1930?]


London; Dear Lewis. This about scrapes the bottom of the pot, but here it is. Glad that things sound a scrap better. I have been in & out of town, [probably abourt lat 1930's/early 1940's?]


New York; Dear Lewis. This is the best I can do as we are quite bushed but maybe I will fill the gap for the moment. I'll let you know the minute I have any news about the book, [probably about 1939?]


New York; My dear Lewis. Alas I have been in Washington almost the entire past month & got your last letter only very recently. Your letter makes me very unhappy


New York; My dear Lewis. I am afraid that I am rather a weak reed though when I get back to town (I write this in the country where I have your two letters [probably around 1940?]


[n.p.] This is the verge of one of those public holidays, I have to rush to catch a train. [probably around 1940?]


[n.p.] Dear Lewis. I have been away & distractedly busy - but here is a fragment of assistance. What do you hear from Washington, I fancied something was about to be fixed up for you there? [probably around 1940?]


New York; Dear Lewis. We did buy the drawings, it seemed the only thing to do after so much delay & dithering around: whether the Museum does or doesn't want [probably about January 1941?]


New York; Dear Lewis. I spent this week in bed - fell out of an automobile & got a slight concussion - so things are rather awkward [probably about December 1941?]


New York; Dear Lewis. Your letter I only read quite late, meanwhile I hear Alfred Barr had spoken to you & will by all means attempt to get the purchase of one or two more drawings [probably around 1939?]


New York; Dear W.L. Do let me suggest, don't try to see the Picasso show at the Museum either on Saturday or Sunday - the galleries are crowded beyond belief, [probably around 1939?]


London; Dear W.L. I think you must admit that I have been very patient and tried not to worry you - although it is now some weeks since I had any money from you [may be December, 1921?]


London; Friday at 12 will mean Saturday after I have some - I suppose - however if not, and if I am not off to country Friday till Doomsday we might dine together [may be last part of a fragment?]


London; My dear Lewis. It is now well on the third week during which I have had no payment from you. It is useless my attempting to get you to ask yourself


London; [Addressed to Lewis, with London postmark]


London; Dearest Lewis. Sorry to bother you, but I didn't ever give you the agreement I made with the people up in Burnley who have Maisie, did I?


London; My dear Lewis. I wish I knew certainly whether you were to be found cirectly at the address to which I send this letter - it is rather a long time since you gave it to me.


Montreal; My dear Lewis. I wonder if after all this time I might ask something of you? I wouldn't unless it were really quite desperate.


[n.p.] Dear Lewis. I have no news, alas. Two publishing houses read the novel but apparently it didn't suit them, now a third one has it but will give no answer until after Xmas -


New York; Dear Lewis; I called Bennett Cerf at Random House who said that he had written you in Canada, but imagined the letter must have missed you


New York; Dear Lewis: The manuscript of "The Hitler Cult" was sent over here on Monday by Random House, so it isn't lost after all. I'm trying to look into the prospects


New York; Dear Lewis. My very much delayed reply comes from my being away for the past five weeks - I was sorry that you missed me when you called


New York; My dear Lewis: I would have written sooner had I had any news, but hope the enclosed will be some slight help for the moment.


[n.p.] Dear Lewis. Your letter didn't reach me in time to do anything about it yesterday - and alas this is the best I can do. I was not over optimisting about Olivet College


London; Dear Sirs, Letchmere v. P.W. Lewis. On the 22nd June 1915 you wrote to us in regard to this matter and as a result of your letter judgement was signed against Mr. Lewis


Oak Park, MI; Der Mrs. Lewis: In my forthcoming book entitled "William Faulkner: The Critical Heritage" to be published in 1974 by Routledge [With carbon of same letter.]


Oxford; Dear Mr. Lewis.You will see from the "blast" that I am enclosing that a more critical journal is shortly to be launched from Oxford.


Oxford; Dear Mr. Lewis. I am sorry your letter has been left waiting [?] of thos days for an acknowledgement. During the term my letter-writing


Marlborough; Dear Mr. Lewis. I have immensely enjoyed "The Writer & the Absolute" which will soon join the ever lengthening row of your works


Paris; Dear Mr. Lewis, As you probably know, mr. Joyce has been laid up for the past nine weeks with his eyes so he begs me to write to you.


Paris; Dear Mr. Lewis, Mr. Joyce asked me to correct a few mistakes in his typescript before sending it to you, but I omitted the following:


Boston; Dear Mr. Lewis: As I'm sure you know, we are planning to publich a Beacon paperback edition of TIME AND WESTERN MAN in the fall of 1957. [Signed Thomas A. Bledsoe]


Boston; Dear Mr. Lewis: Thanks for your note of January 7th. I look forward to receiving your new Presface and to hearing from you if you discover changes


[n.p.] ... room confortable for you. On Monday and Tuesday I shall be busy having bedrooms altered - the girls are very good in looking after things


Gipsy Hill, SC; ... that she comes back late Monday evening, & may with her & sleep with her, having to go to London next morning:


Gipsy Hill, SC; My dear Annie, Here I am again in your mama's dear little room as happy as a Queen and as they are still at lunch I will amuse myself writing a few line [With typed transcript.]


Gipsy Hill, SC; Thanks my dear friend for your kind letter - it appears an age since I lost my own Darling, and at the same time as if it were only yesterday.


Gipsy Hill, SC; My dear Mrs. Prickett. I am very sorry to hear from your note this morning that you are after a respite again unwell. [With poem and envelope.]


Gipsy Hill, SC; My dear Mrs. Prickett. Many thanks for your kind note & am very sorry to hear you have again been so unwell and feel so weak - rest as much as you can [With transcription.]


Gipsy Hill, SC; Tuesday, 4th. Here we are my very dear old chum and here we shall remain until you pay us the long looked for visit. When will that be? [With transcription.]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Perhaps you know that my husband died last November. [Signed Helen Lessore


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I rang you up not long ago, but could not get a reply. I hope that if you are away [Signed F. Lessore


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis: This should probably have been written to you in 1933,


[n.p.] He's getting confused now - Can we stop?


[n.p.] Love from Agnes [Birthday card]


[n.p.] My dear Froanna: How can you think I could behave so horribly to you? How could I give any sort of party


[n.p.] How very sad about Eric N.- I only heard him on the radio a few weeks ago -


Eastbourne; Dearest Froanna/ A terrific gale blowing - I wonder how your week-end will have turned out


London; My dear Froanna, I've tried to get your number a dozen of times. Geoffrey Bidson rang me last week.


[n.p.] My dear Froanna: I wonder what the reheasal was like? Except for Stephen Murray the homes in the east mean nothing to me.


London; Darling Fro- (and I mean the darling) - I thought about all this business of the letter -what to leave in & what to take out --


London; My dear Froanna: I'm feeling much steadier for the complete peace and quiet down here -


London; My dear Froanna: "The Revenge for Love" is on Sunday week - I do hope you are all right


[n.p.] Whatever your feelings are towards me I still want to wish you happiness in the New York [Christmas card]


London; My love and blessings to you dear Froanna


London; Dearest F. I tried to get you earlier in the week, wanting to express myself about Edith S.


London; Dearest Froanna: I gave you a ring at New Year but concluded you were still away. I do hope you enjoyed your Christmas visit,


Colchester; It's lovely here and I've been feeling so well, & as though I wanted to stay in the country forever


London; Dearest F. I had enclosed from our Miss Cooksen - [?] & now doing his finals or whatever they're called at Oxford.


Worthing; I bought a birthday card for you, but of course have left it at home. So this is to bring you my love & greetings,


London; Dear F: I don't seem to be able to get you on the phone. I do hope you are not ill again.


London; Dearest F: I rang you at 4.0 & again at 5.0, but no reply - I will try you again tomorrow morning.


London; Dear Froanna: I enclose cheque for 29 [pounds]. I am indeed sorry to have owed you money for so long,


London; Dear Franna: I am sorry you have fresh business worries. Let me know anyway in which I can help you


London; Dear Froanna: I have just received the "Canadian Literature" number about Wyndham in Canada.


London;


London; My dear Froanna: I do so enjoy your letter, and liked it even better for being hand-written


London; My dear Froanna: It cheered my up a lot to have you most interesting and amusing letter.


London; Dear Wyndham; Now arrived at the Mister Wyndham Lewis, & postcard stage. Hope the book's going well


[n.p.] Dear Wyndham; Thank you for the cheque. This is to remind you I am going to Walmer for a few days tomorrow


London; Dear Wyndham; It's kind of you to continue to enquire - I am very glad to you your messages


Essex; My dear Wyndham: I do hope my adventures are nearly at an end. I had not heart to write from that hospital - they sent me off, as you heard,


Essex; My dear Wyndham: No- I don't seem to fit in to thos dramatic scenes I wrote you about - I already begin to wonder if they really happened to me


Norfolk, England; Dear Mr. Eddy, Very many thanks for the print of the Lewis sketch. The finished portrait is a much better affair.


London; My dear Lewis, I spoke to Lord Herbert Scott yesterday on the subject of drawings. He would like five done - one himself, his wife, his boy and two girls.


London; My dear Lewis, Please forgive me - but I caught a chill yesterday and have got a slight temperature - I thought I'd be all right to come


London; My dear Lewis, I saw Herbert Scott yesterday, who unfortunately did not care at all for your drawing of his wife.


London; Dear Lewis, Violet told me that you had been good enough to suggest that if I didn't specially like the drawing of Lady Scott you'd be willing to exchange it


Rodmell, Lewes; Dear Lewis, I have been asked to choose a few English pictures for 'The Second Post-Impressionist Exhibition' --


Salisbury; Dear Lewis, I'm sorry I couldn't come to your 'show' but glad to surmise from 'The Times' that it was a success.


London;One line before I go to bed to say, in the first place, how much I like your picture, and that Fry and my wife -


London; Dear Lewis, Have you really nothng? or are you simply bored and irritated by the whole business?


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Fry passed on your query. I'm afraid the Society would never let me buy outright


London; Dear Lewis, Here is a cheque for 50 (pounds).0.0. My wife tells me that stretching a big canvass is a complicated affair


London; Many thanks. I will come tomorrow afternoon. To the 'Petit Savoyard'. If out will you send a card


London; Dear Lewis,


London; It would be possible to hang the picture at the cord of my wife's studio - where John's Pyramus once hung.


Perth; Dear Wyndham Lewis/ Just heard the last of your Trilogy and write to congratulate you on your achievement


Buffalo; [Return address clipped from envelope and pasted on another envelope with no addressee.]


Buffalo; [No notes or contents; addressed to England.]


London; Can you come to a meeting of the Mill St. Club here on Friday next the 14th at 5 o'clock?


London; Dear Mr. Lewes[sic] The meeting tomorrow is postponed as no one seems able to come.


London; Dear Mr. Lewis Will you dine with us on Thursday, July 11th at 8 o'clock? I hope you'll be able to.


London; Did you get a letter from me asking you to dine with us on the 11th? I hope you'll be able to come.


Saratoga Springs, NY; Dear Mrs. Lewis: May I have permission to reproduce a portrait drawing of the novelist Ronald Firbank


Saratoga Springs, NY; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Please forgive me for troubling you again in the matter of my biography


Kirkby Lonsdale; Dear Mr. Lewis: I should be very much obliged if you would be so kind as to allow me to include [torn into two pieces]


Worksop. Notts.; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis: I am very much obliged to you for giving me permission to include


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I wish I could just walk round and see you. Writing a letter is too great a temptation to "compose".


London; Dear Lewis/ Can you lunch with me next Wednesday 1.15. Lady Cholmondelay is coming.


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Would you be kind enough to let me know whether you are willing to undertake the commission


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis. You will remember our conversation, and that you were coming in one afternoon this week


Mont-Louis, France; Dear Mr. Lewis. You will be surprised to get at [sic] letter from me. But I thought I would write and tell you that I am walking in the Pyrenees


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. I have to go away for a time so I am dropping a note to you. I called in to Lee Brown & Phillips the other day


New York; Dear Madam: We have been asked by one of our publisher friends, Washington Square Press, one of the respected Pocket Book publishers


Pangbourne, Berkshire; Dear Sir, May I as a painter, say thank you for yr. timely article in the Listener for saying so splendidly what most of us cannot say for ourselves.


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis. Many, many thanks for your very great kindness. I am so very grateful for your generosity in lending me the Eliot letter


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: In connection with a biography of Sydney Schiff, I am interested in meeting with old friends and acquaintances who might be able to shed some light


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: I wrote to you some time ago in connection with a biography of Sydney and Violet Schiff. Their friendship with Wyndham Lewis was a very important one


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: You may recall our brief conversation at the Wyndham Lewis Sympsium at the Tate in April. At that time, you graciously gave me permission


London; My dear Moore, I don't know Lewis's address, but think you do. The Editor of the Oxford & Cambridge Review applied to me this morning for a poem


London; Dear Lewis, As I expect you know, I have now received from Messrs. Cassell & Co. Ltd. the cheque for 50 (pounds) which is in settlement


Santa Barbara; Dear Mrs. Salmon: Please reserve one full-page Primary Adspace for our paid notice refuting your irresponsible, [Facsimile copies of letter and 3 leaves containing a book review of the Morrow/Lafourcade Lewis bibliography and add for same.]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, This is just to remind you about Monday & to give you a not of our address & my name in case you have forgotten.


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, This is just to let you know that I got the picture back, without accident. I have told Bone, Schwabe and Jewett about it


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, When can I call on you & bring the 3 drawings that I am so anxious to hand over to you? They are sketches by you


Bristol; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis.Just a line as promised to say I am having a wonderfull holiday, and the first week was glorious, we had a thunderstorm on Saturday,


Bristol; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis.Just a line to say that I am having a lovely time here with my Brother and Sister-in-law they are both verykind to me, they have taken me to several interesting places


New York; Dear Mr. Spender: This will acknowledge your letter to me of January 18th enclosing the correspondence concerning Wyndham Lewis. [Signed John D. Barrett]


London; P. Wyndham Lewis, We are foregathering with members of the Borough group at the Archer Gallery 303 Westdowne [?] V.11. Tuesday 15th June


London; Dear Lewis. You may wish to go further than you have & write a book about my struggle to paint. With this in view I called at the Phaidon Press


London; Dear Lewis. We have assembled the rejects together but were not satisfied that it was a strong enough challenge. Therefore we have retained some rejects


[n.p.] ... My brother, whom you met in Windsor is also here at St. Michael's College. He has been ill for several months but is making a satisfactory recovery now.


Windsor, Ontario; Dear Mr. Lewis, I hope you haven't worried too much about your apartment. The door locked very easily from the inside


Windsor, Ontario; Dear Mr. Lewis, You may r3est at ease; the apartment has been turned over to Miss Cruise who had a tenant waiting. Your easel, table, and


Petersfield, Hants.; Dear Wyndham Lewis/ Yours just this moment arrived. I have no doubt that you have arranged something all right with Gockney.


London; Dear Lewis, Thank you for your letter. I am doing what I can to secure you a commission, but I fear there is a long list of applicants for commissions


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I have pleasure in enclosing a copy of the December BOOKS OF TODAY [Signed Stuart Smith]


Rochestown, Ireland; My dearest Frau Anne, We haven't heard from you for a long time - hope you got my sick letter


[n.p.] Dear Froanna. We were delighted to get yours; yesterday I was beginning to get worried and have a strange feeling


Canaria, Spain; My dear Froanna, Yours just arrived - 3 letters in 4 days; from you, wonderful!


[Maestro Valle, Spain?] My dear Froanna, How are you? It seems simply ages since we last heard, but actually only two weeks.


Rochestown, Ireland; Dear Frau Anna, I am very sorry not to have written when Hedi wrote you - but I have been rather ill


Rochestown, Ireland; Dear Frau Anna, We were very pleased to hear from you again - but are distressed that you shd. be so worried.


Canaria, Spain; My dear Froanna! You can't imagine how delighted we were to get your lovely letter. We had almost lost hope


Maestro Valle, Spain; Dear Froanna! It will be simply splendid if you can come in June - better still rather sooner.


Maestro Valle, Spain; Dear Froanna, I am very glad to hear that you have become a Catholic - it is almost the only firm thing


Canaria, Spain; Dear Froanna, Our best thanks for the cheque - it is very good of you to send it so promptly. [Added ALS from Hedi.]


Canaria, Spain; My dear Froanna, Thanks for yours of date (?). I do not think you need an estimate for shipping the furniture


Canaria, Spain; Dear Froanna, Just a word to tell you we have now seen the captain we spoke of. [Added ALS from Hedi.]


Canaria, Spain; Dear Froanna, Yours of last Thur: just came now. I reply at once. It is most annoying that all these difficulties emerge


Maestro Valle, Spain; Dear Froanna, We have been thinking over the furniture problem carefully. One of our pupils


Maestro Valle, Spain; Dear Froanna, Just a word to tell you about the electricity - it is 110 as you were told in London. [Added ALS from Hedi]


Maestro Valle, Spain; Dear Froanna, I hope you are not getting too bothered about all the last minute things! There is still time enough [Added ALS from Hedi.]


Jovellanos; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, I am sorry to trouble you, but we find that by mistake the book called THE HEART OF JADE


Letchworth; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Many thanks for your letter. We should greatly enjoy coming on Fri. next,


Letchworth; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Your wire just come.[sic] I am only just returned; am sorry not to have written.


Letchworth; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis,I should be very pleased to come on Tues. next to tea (which I agree is the best time for talk)


Letchworth; Dear Sir, I feel prompted to write to you with regard to your "Art of Being Ruled" (and "Paleface")


Letchworth; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I shall, of course, be delighted to have the opportunity of discussing these matters with you.


Letchworth; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Many thanks for the review and the photos. I think the editor will use the one of your own.


Letchworth; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Please excuse a short delay - I now send you the book by Edberhardt. It is not well written,


Letchworth; Dear Wyndham Lewis, We are just back from a holiday in Wales. I got yr. card as to address. Before we went - middle of July -


Letchworth; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Just a line to tell you I have the suggested article for "The Enemy", in a rough form. I do not know exactly when you will be getting the issue together,


Letchworth; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I have been down with my annual influenza, and am only just about again. Hence my long silence, and absence of mind and body!


Letchworth; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Just a line to apologise for delay in replying to yours. We were just getting off from a journey down here - Sussex -


Letchworth; Dear Wyndham Lewis, We were delighted to get the copy of your new novel - more especially as you signed it. I thank you most warmly for sending it.


Letchworth; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Thanks for your note from Berlin. We have only just arrived home. I am sorry there is no chance of meeting you over there;


Letchworth; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I am so extremely sorry we could not come up to town recently. Unfortunately I have been very unwell again.


Letchworth; Dear W L, I hope you got my long letter of three days ago all right! We can't even get an Eng. paper now! It is rather a nuisance,


Rochestown, Ireland; Dear W.L. Just a word abt. the donversatn. I had yest. with my manager. Yrs. came this mng. as I was abt. to write. I asked him abt. transferring the act.


Rochestown, Ireland; Dear W.L. I am very sorry about all these worries - they must be terribly trying for you! UI have now written to the Lloyds B. man,


Rochestown, Ireland; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Going through my old letters recently I was reminded so strongly of our old friendship that I felt I ought to write,


Rochestown, Ireland; Dear Wyndham Lewis, We were both very glad to get news at last! I hope the eye trouble is not serious? That would be a bad business for you,


[London] Dearest Anne:- So sorry you are beset by worries from all directions! We all seem to be, these sorry days. And we were disappointed not to see you.


London; Dearest Anne, This really doesn't matter to you but I'd said I'd send it. What do you think of the profile drawing? Emily is really down.


London; What about these? Turkey cooks nice but Rockland is worn. I do hope you are feeling better.


London; Dearest Anne, I write by return of post: your letter of a week ago, the 25th Aug., has just reached me! I have no faith, and indeed, I hope not,


London; Darling, Just a not to say I've just rung your telephone (24 times!) to see if you were better. I hope you're out and all right - If you were there,


London; Dearest Anne, I don't want to intrude ever as I love you very much and shall miss you on Sunday - but what you feel you can't do, you mustn't try to do -


Washington, D.C.; Dearest Anne, Thank you so very much for getting Emily's flowers for one - They'll be a bit of use returning - Cook here to tell you


London; Dearest Anne, Thank you for the telegram which I got early this morning - you weren't home the two times I called (tea time, dinner time)


London; Dearest Anne,I'm bringing this over by hand because you wouln't get it otherwise until Monday - "Quim-ban-Quimbang" - 14 times the telephone has been ringing you;


London; Dearest Anne, "While reason holds to sway in this destracted plebe" (misquoted!) My love and Easter blessings.


London; Dearest Anne, I am writing what I am too shy to say, but what I want you to know just the same - I am desolate. Of course, I want you to get away from England


London; Dearest Anne, It is 20 minutes past midnight so it's the 25th and Friday, but I am thinking in terms of "today, Thursday" as we night-hawks do ...


London; My dearest Anne, You must struggle with my handwriting today - I've had 3 days of neck & vertigo (cleaned house not wisely but too well & am paying.)


London; Dearest Anne,


London; Dear Anne, Your letter came this (?) Minday, afteroon. I am about to emerge from a harrowing week - first Mike, then Patch, and more unpleasantness from Margaret Steeder.


London; Dear Anne, The funny little grandfather fur man said he'd cut the collar, but "dear Madam - you must not worry. It can be altered"


London; Dearest Anne, I've looked in my diary and I wrote to you on the 4th, mailed on the 5th - so that letter never reached you & we have to forget it!


London; Anne dear - This clipping should have gone off with the other! I am still miserably communicating with you via notes because the beastly virus has me still in its grip


London; Dearest Anne, I wrote you - oh! long ago. Not the letter that you never got, another one - I hope you've been "as well as can be expected"


London; Anne dear- You might see me before you see these if you are at home and I can find a parking space on my way home about 1:15 pm


[London] My very dear Anne: So long has gone by without a word from you since we last talked on the telephone. You said then that your need was to be "left alone";


Shawford, Hants.; Dear Sir- Some years ago I wrote to Daily Telegraph and painted one - now heard it was in Sculptors not to have space for a fair exhibit of the years work.


Toronto; Dear Sir- Received your kind registered letter also Postal Note. You state you forget what arrangements we made about your mail, I looked up my P.O. records,


Claremont, CA; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I am writing to compliment you on your fine book, "Rude Assignment". It will surely find its place in history


London; Please rign urgently regent - London 1985.


[n.p.] Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis. Please accept this further intrusion. You will no doubt discover a deal of influence in the enclosed. Perhaps I am a better painter


Bolton, Lancs.; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Please forgive my wrinting as a stranger - I was deeply sorry to read about the death of your husband


Bolton, Lancs.; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis. I hope you will not regard this letter as an intrusion. Perhaps you will find it a little interesting; for myself it serves to send off my thought


Bolton, Lancs.; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis. As a person who is actively interested in Art, would you please give the accompanying letter due consideration?


[n.p.] Dear Mrs. Lewis, Leacock-Pennebaker's publishing plans are defunct, and I am no longer there. Few things have depressed me more, made me feel so idiot and green,


Toronto; Dear Mr. Lewis, I heard last year through Mr. Burgess that you were in Toronto, and hoped to be able to meet you. When I finally reached the point of doing something,


London; Dear Sir. We have been instructed by our clients Barclays Bank Ltd. of 1 Pall Mall East to apply to you for payment of the sume of (pounds) 228.4.6 the amount overdrawn


Hampstead; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you so much for the lovely drinks and good company on Saturday. I enjoyed seeing you again very much;


Hampstead; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I am writing an anthology of juvenalism. For instance, I have a poem by Andrew Young written before he was 5;


Hampstead; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Duckworth's are going to issue a collection of the letters of the late J. R. Ackerley, the literary editor of "The Listener".


Cowes; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I am now in the last stages of editing the letters of J. R. Ackerley. I enclose a carbon of one of them - and also of the footnotes.


New York; Gentlemen: We are in receipt of your bill for one hundred copies of the "Enemy" number three. We fail to understand why you sent us one hundred copies of this issue.


Paris; Dear Sirs, Replying to your favour of the 11th inst., just to hand we beg to resume as follows: We received one copy No1 "The ENEMY" with your letter


Paris; Dear Sir, We have to hand your letter addressed to Mr. Shaylor and beg to inform you that we shall be pleased to undertake the sale of your publication


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Riette Sturge Moore thinks you may like to have a copy of the book she wrote to you about, which I have edited.


London; With best wishes for Christmas and the New Year. To Froanna with love


London; Dear Froanna, It was nice to hear from you as we had been wondering where you had come to rest. I have been really busy (still am) on my Negro in America


London; Dear Froanna, I remember you told me that you wanted a copy of "Rude Assignment" 7 as I have just found a better one for myself I thought you might like this working copy


London; Dear Froanna, Joyce has told you how sorry I am that I have had to cry off for Saturday evening after all. I have been put into a TV show


London; Dear Froanna, Many thanks for sending me the copy of "Apollo" with the piece on Wyndham which I was very glad to have. I am glad to see that attention


London; Dear Froanna, It was nice to have your letter and learn that you were duly installed among the canaries - cockroaches notwithstanding.


London; Dear Froanna, It is so long since we heard from you that I have again had to get your address from Allan White. Just before Christmas I am planning a broadcast


London; Dear Froanna, I went round to Bertram Rota Ltd. & asked them how much they would pony for Wyndham's "Timon of Athens" folio. They only offered (pound)75 -


London; Dear Froanna, I wonder whether you would mind having a look at the enclosed synopsis for a book I am thinking of writing about Wyndham's political prose?


London; Dear Froanna, Splendid! I'm very glad that you like the idea, and also the synopsis. I am sure you can put me right on many things,


London; Dear Froanna, I had been intending coming to see you immediately after Easter, but decided not to ring you until I saw how the go-slow on the railways worked out.


London; Dear Froanna, Now that the rail go-slow seems to have sorted itself out, I think I had better make a quick dash down to Devonshire to discuss the points


London; Dear Froanna, Many thanks for your kind letter. I have passed it on to David Higham Associates, and asked my friend Bruce Hunter there to draw up a formal agreement


London; Dear Froanna, Many thanks for your letter. I think I shall simply take a chance on the matter, and presume that Sicily is either a mis-reading or some private code


London; Dear Froanna, I was very sorry to hear about your trouble with the Income Tax people: they really can be a terrible nuisance. I enclose a cheque


London; Dear Froanna, Good luck - here's the cheque for the TIMON OF ATHENS folio, which I hope will help out with the Income Tax people.


London; Dear Froanna, It was nice hearing your voice again last night, muffled with nuts as it was to begin with! I have today posted the MS of THE FILIBUSTER


London; Dear Froanna, I have been meaning for a week to write and say how glad I was that you finally agreed to Cassell's using the Tyro self-portrait


London; My dear Froanna, I had been meaning to write to you for some time, but as usual fell behind my good intentions. Anyhow, I had good news of you


New York; Dear Lewis, I am just passing through New York again on my way down to New Orleans, and thought you would like to hear how THE CHILDERMASS went down at Harvard


London; Dear Wyndham, Here is the last section of "Malign Fiesta", which should reach you by Saturday - if the Post is still to be relied on!


London; Dear Wyndham, I am returning this scene for expansion, as it is too short for its dramatic context. Would you please expand it to fill the whole page? [On British Broadcasting Corp. letterhead.]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Ever since I first got interested in radio production, I have cherished the idea of mounting a broadcast performance of "The Childermass." [On British Broadcasting Corp. letterhead.]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, As promised, here is the last quarter of the script. I really think that it has worked out rather well, and hope that you agree. [On British Broadcasting Corp. letterhead.]


New York; Dear Lewis, I am duly installed over here & enjoying everything very much except the heat & humidity - both of which are quite awful. [On British Broadcasting Corp. letterhead.]


New York; Dear Lewis, I am just passing through New York again on my way down to New Orleans, and thought you would like to hear how THE CHILDERMASS went down at Harvard [On British Broadcasting Corp. letterhead.]


London; Dear Lewis, I have just got back from Washington, where I took the discs of THE CHILDERMASS last week. I was very lucky to catch Juntington Cairas [On British Broadcasting Corp. letterhead.]


London; Dear Lewis, Here is a copy of the text of Richards' piece on "The Childermass" as promised. I have no actual date for the broadcast as yet, [On British Broadcasting Corp. letterhead.]


London; Dear Lewis, Here is the talk by Walter Allen which I forgot to bring for you. What a cracking good eveing we had last Saturday. [On British Broadcasting Corp. letterhead.]


London; Dear Lewis, I sympathise with your anxiety, but there is really nothing to worry about! I have just been checking with Methuen's [On British Broadcasting Corp. letterhead.]


London; Dear Wyndham, That was a very good evening we had and I hope you enjoyed it as much as I did. Here is the piece on Billy Graham which I promised you. [On British Broadcasting Corp. letterhead.]


London; Dear Wyndham, Here as promised is my draft of the first half of "Malign Fiesta:. You will see what I have done with Dis - [On British Broadcasting Corp. letterhead.]


London; Dear Wyndham, Here is the last section of "Malign Fiesta", which should reach you by Saturday - if the Post is still to be relied on! [On British Broadcasting Corp. letterhead.]


London; Dear Wyndham, I wonder whether it would be convenient for me to come round and record you for the Cafe Royal programme either on Thursday or Friday [On British Broadcasting Corp. letterhead.]


London; Dear Wyndham, Here is the dialogue which you wanted. I will get in touch with you shortly about another meal - this time with Joyce and me. [On British Broadcasting Corp. letterhead.]


London; My dear Wyndham, I am very sorry not to have been available when you rang, and not to have been able to ring you back - except in the mid-afternoon [On British Broadcasting Corp. letterhead.]


London; Dear Wyndham, I have now had an opportunity of working over "Tarr" in detail, and have the adaptation quite clear in my mind. [With leaf for extra scenes. On British Broadcasting Corp. letterhead.]


London; Dear Wyndham, I am very sorry to have been so slow getting in touch with you, but have been literally up to the eyes with eight shows [On British Broadcasting Corp. letterhead.]


London; My dear Wyndham, I have just heard from America that the Head of St. Elizabeth's Hospital has promised his full co-operation in the making of any recordings by Ezra [On British Broadcasting Corp. letterhead.]


London; Dear Wyndham & Froanna. I have just heard from Joyce the sad news about Wyndham being so unwell - & I do hope you're feeling better by now. [On British Broadcasting Corp. letterhead.]


London; Agnes dear, Here are two copies, one for you & one for Franna, from the script of last Friday's "Today" which referes to Wyndham. [Refiled from folder 91.24.]


Hampstead; Dearest Froanna, Long time no see. I have rung you a couple of times with no result & then belatedly learned from Dorothy Spokes that you were esconced


Hampstead; Froanna dear, Thank you so much from both of us for the gorgeous dinner & a delightful evening. We loved your two friends & generally enjoyed ourselves


London; My very dear Froanna, I dispair of having a phone free long enough to call you & mine at home has gone wrong except for in-coming calls!


Hampstead; My very dear Froanna, Will you please try to forgive me, you and Wyndham, for being such a disgustingly long time in writing to thank you for the wonderful dinner,


Hampstead; I don't know why, but my grace notes are always late. None the less, here is a very grateful thank you for a most magnificient dinner on Friday


Hampstead; Dearest Froanna, Just a rapid note to give you our news. Geoffrey & I are skipping off very quietly & getting married on April 9.


London; Froanna dear, Just to confirm that we are very much looking forward to seeing you tomorrow week, Saturday, May 23. I delight with you


Godalming, England; Dearest Froanna, Thank you so much for wiring me - it cheered me up a lot & I am looking forward very much to the flowers.


London; Dear Froanna, Please forgive me for being such an age in forwarding your handkerchiefs. I laundered them some time ago & then immediately, & bleissfully, forgot


London; Dear Froanna, What on earth could I, all unwittingly, have said to you to accound for your apologetic letter this morning?


London; My very dear Froanna, We have only just come-to in time to write in thanking you and Wyndham for the wonderful evening you gave us on Saturday.


London; Froanna dear, It is a long while since we saw you but, in our defence, it has been a long while since Geoffrey & I were both at home together


London; Dearest Froanna, I have tried to ring you four times & every time I lift the receiver I find an avid newshound on the end of it! This is, moreover, the third letter


London; Dearest Froanna, Please forgive me for not having rung you. I developed a small abcess on the operation scar & have been feeling pretty miserable.


London; Froanna dear, My Christmas list is gone [aglu?] so forgive me if this is the second card I've sent you! [Christmas card.]


London; Froanna dear, It was marvellous to meet up with you at the Tate, looking so well & lovely. I meant to write so, long ago, but time has caught me up. [Christmas card.]


London; Dearest Froanna, [Christmas card.]


London; Dearest Froanna, With love from Joyce & Geoffrey [Christmas card.]


London; To Froanna[Christmas card.]


London; Froanna, [Christmas card.]


London; Dearest Froanna, Where are you (I hope this address is right?) and how are you? We have thought so much about you & would so much like to see you [Christmas card.]


London; We hope you are well & happy (& feel [? ?] because we haven't rung you up to say hello.) [Christmas card.]


London; Froanna dear, We have decided to hold a small party for "refugees from Christmas" and even if you aren't one, we should love you to come.


London; Dear Froanna, It seems an enormously long time since we saw you both & old Bridson & I feel this should be remedied forthwith.


London; My very deqar Froanna, Forgive a very belated but sincere thank you for inviting me round last Thursday. You and Wyndham always make the most fascinating parties


London; Dearest Froanna, Here be patterns & stockings. We had to get bust 36 in one pattern because it's the largest size they make but all Vogue patterns are girth enormous,


London; Dearest Froanna, Have just received a cable from Hugh Kenner telling me his wife - that sweet thing Mary-Jo - died yesterday & asking me to notify all London friends.


London; Dearest Froanna, Here be cheque book - I do hope you don't have to pay overweight because I don't seem to have many stamps on me


London; Dearest Froanna, How lovely to hear from you & thank you for your loving sympathy. I should be all right by now; darn it, I am all right.


London; Dearest Froanna, Trust me, I left out an important item from my letter to you. BLAST is at 9.15 pm. on Wed., December 18, in the Third Prog.


London, Dearest Froanna, Geoffrey was both touched & delighted by your letter & we are both delighted to hear you will be in town next week.


London; Dearest Froanna, Geoffrey has asked me to answer your sweet letter to him as he is incarcerated in the studio producing Thomas Chatterton


London; Dear Froanna, Slight change of timing on Monday since Geoffrey's recording time has been switched till afternoon. Don't bother to answer


London, Dearest Froanna, We do so hope you have second that flat in Devon - even though it's taking you over further away from us.


London; Dearest Froanna, We are absolutely delighted to hear that you have secured the home of your dreams and look forward some time to visiting you there.


Venice; Dearest Froanna, We send this to you in your new &, we hope, very happy new home from under the chadow of Colleani - waiting for a couple of campari sodas!


London; Dearest Froanna, I am much ashamed at not getting in touch for so long. We hope you are fit and well and enjoying the beauties of Devon?


London; Thank you very much indeed for your kind co-operation in helping us to produce this issue of PROMPT. I hope the finished product is of some interest to you. [On University College London Union letterhead.]


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, This is just to let you know that we are hoping to give a repeat performance of "The Revenge for Love" in our Third Programme [Signed Elsie H. Wakeham]


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, In the Third Programme on 13th October we are planning to broadcast a recorded repeat performance of THE CHILDERMASS. [With Agreement; signed by Elsie Wakeham]


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Your letter of 11th January and Stephen Cross's acknowledgment of 16th January have been passed to me [Signed R. G. Walford]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. You will think me a monster not to have replied before to your letter of Jan.18. But I have had flu, then my wife had it.[Signed P. H. Newby]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis. How will the enclosed do? The photograph was very much on the dark side, and the block maker had some difficulty [Signed Ernest Williams]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you for your letter. I am glad dthat Randolph Hughes got in touch with you. I should be very pleased to come round to your studio [ Signed John Thear?]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I should have acknowledged the "Old Masters" manuscript. We will consider this suggestion as soon as we have an alternative from you. [Signed John Thear?]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Roy Campbell tells me that you might be prepared to broadcast a talk in the new Third Programme which begins on Sunday. [Signed Basil Taylor]


London; Desire broadcast programme about your work living writers third programme November 2nd couldst kindly ring Miss Ross [Signed Ross Broadcasts]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Did I, by any chance, leave my STubbs photographs with you on Tuesday? I'm so sorry to trouble you in this way, [Signed Basil Taylor]


Birmingham; Dear Sir, I understand from Mr. James Taylor in London that you would be interested in contributing to the series of talks I am running [Signed Paul Humphreys]


Birmingham; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis. I was delighted to have your letter and to know that you would like to contribute to my talks series. [Signed Paul Humphreys]


Birmingham; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I am sorry to have been several days writing to you to thank you for having agreed to do the talk for me and, [Signed Paul Humphreys]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I thought you would like a corrected copy of the script of Mr. Grigson's broadcast. I am very sorry indeed that I haven't sent this before [Signed Gilbert H. Phelps]


Birmingham; Suggest meeting you at broadcasting house London tomorrow at 2.15 pm as we shall need time to discuss script [Signed Paul Hamphreys]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Herbert Read told me that you were interested in the Crisis talks. I would be very happy if you would do one of them [Signed Anna Kallin]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis- This is to give you the exact address of the restaurant: "Elysee" 13 TercyStreet [Signed Anna Kallin]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, The series "Living Writers" which I produced for The Third Programme is being published by the Sylvan Press,[Signed Gilbert Phelps]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you very much for your kind permission to use the quotations from your work in the reproduction [Signed Gilbert Phelps]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, This is to confirm that you have granted us one serial use in the "British Ally", Russia, in your article: PURITANS OF THE STEPPES [Signed George Dilnot]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, We should like to use, in connection with the BBC Transcription Service, the talk entitled "Living Writers" [Signed Elsi H. Wakeham]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I was talking to Roy Campbell this morning and he told me that you might be willing to broadcast in my programme [Signed James Langham]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Many thanks for your telegram and telephone call this afternoon about the use of your poem "The Song of the Militent Romance" [ Signed E. M. Layton]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I am returning the print of 'The Doctor' which you were kind enough to lend me the other week. [Signed Patricia Eutract]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, We are proposing to re-broadcast in the Third Programme on Sunday 13th February at 10.55 p.m. [Signed E. M. Layton]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, On 6th July the Third Programme is having a reading of Ronsard's proems in the original and in translation, [Signed Anna Kallin]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Would it amuse you to write a short unsigned review of the enclosed King Penguin, 'Popular Art in the United States' [Signed Maurice Ashley]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, May I make yet one more appeal to you to take part in my series:ARTISTS ON ART"? {Signed Leonie Cohn]


London; Dear Sir, I am told that you are preparing a special ninety-minute radio version of your work "The Childermass", which we are hoping to broadcast [Signed B. H. Gray]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Confirming our telephone conversation this morning, I am sorry that you have been puzzled by the wording of the contract


London; Dear Sir, Mr. Bridson has asked me to write to you once more about the future broadcasts of a radiio version of your work "THE CHILDERMASS". [Signed B. H. Gray]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, On 23rd June our German Service would like to broadcast a shortened German varsion, about three-quarters [Signed B. H. Alexander]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Many thanks for your telegram authorising us to broadcast a German version of your LISTENER article [Signed B. H. Alexander]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndhgam Lewis, You will be now have heard from Mr. Bridson that we should like to commission you to complete your work "The Childermass" [Signed B. H. Gray]


London; Dear Sir, Our Latin-American Service are broadcasting in Spanish a series entitle "Book of the Week" which is designed to introduce recent successful English novels [Signed B. H. Alexander]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham-Lewis, We are glad to hear from Michael Ayrton that you are prepared to consider recording two pieces for the Third Programme [Signed P. H. Newby]


London; Dear Sir, We understand from Mr. Newby that you have kindly agreed in principle to make two recordings at your home, [Signed Ronald Boswell]


London; Dear Sir, Thank you for your letter of 2nd November in reply to ours of 1st November offering you a fee of 30 guineas [Signed Ronald Boswell]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you for your letter of November 2nd. It is good news indeed that you think favouirable of the idea [Signed P. H. Newby]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I so much enjoyed my visit last Friday and would like to say how grateful I am. About the Turkish Delight. [Signed P. H. Newby]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Our French Service are proposing to broadcast tomorrow evening a review of "The Demon of Progress in the Arts" [Signed B. H. Alexander]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I understand that you have now completed "The Childermass" Parts 2 and 3 and that they will be published by Methuen [Signed Elsie H. Wakeham]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Thank you for your letter of 20th January. I have discussed this with Mr. Bridson and we shall be perfectly willing [Signed Elsie H. Wakeham]


London; Dear Sir, We are preparing a new edition of our Schools Broadcasting pamphlet for Sixth Forms entitled "The Language of the Visual Arts" [ Signed M. Fells]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, In my letter of the 19th January I gave details of the fees for the broadcast performances of the radio adaptations [Signed Elsie H. Wakeham]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you for your letter of 22nd October, and for giving us your permission to show your portrait of T.S. Eliot. [Signed Sheila Gregg]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I understand that you have agreed to prepare, with the assistance of Mr. Bridson, a two-hour radio dramatisation of "Tarr" [Signed Miss E. H. Wakeham]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, This is just to let you know that we are hoping to give a repeat performance of "Tarr" on the 13th January from 3.00 to 5.35 p.m. [Signed Miss E. H. Wakeham]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, In our French Service at a future date we should like to broadcast a dramatised version in French of your story "The Bishop's Fool", [Signed B. H. Alexander]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Since I wrote to you on 8th January about the French Service broadcasting a dramatisation of "The Bishop's Fool", [Signed B. H. Alexander]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I understand that you have agreed to prepare, with the assistance of Mr. Bridson, a two-hour radio dramatisation of "The Revenge for Love" [Signed Miss E. H. Wakeham]


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, I was most sorry to hear from Miss Moore, the producer of "The Critics", that you were displeased [Signed P. H. Newby]


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you for your letter of 11th January. I am so sorry if there has been an oversight such as you suggest, [Signed Stephen Cross]


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, In the Third Programme on the 23rd December in a programme entitled "Satire and Invective" we broadcast an extract [Signed Miss Elsie Wakeham]


London; "THE CHILDERMASS" [Fee statement]


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Further to my letter of 9th November, the programme by Walter Allen was broadcast on 30th November [Signed Jack Beale]


London; [Agreement to televise copyright material in programme: "Omnibus: The Mysterious Mr. Eliot". Signed R. G. Walford and G. A. Wyndham Lewis]


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, In a programme called LOST TO MYSELF which is to be broadcast on Radio-3 on a date to be decided, the BBC would like to include [Signed Jack Beale. Included is Agreement for the extract.]


London;Dear Mrs. Lewis, I do not seem to have received a reply to my letter to you dated 23rd April 1971 regarding the use of an extract [Signed Jack Beale]


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, The educational branch of the B.B.C. Television Service, the Open University, is preparing a programme on Ezra Pound, [Signed Deborah Pounall]


London;Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, [Authority to Televise Artistic Works form for "The History of Europe Since 1900". Signed Brian Turner and G. A. Wyndham Lewis]


London; Dear Mr. Moore, Thank you for your letter of 11th February enclosing a copy of Mr. Wyndham Lewis' Will. Our Accounts Department are arranging [Signed Miss E. H. Wakeham]


St. Louis; I telephoned Mr. Cane at Detroit in regard to Mr. Wyndham Lewis' desire for an extension of his permit for another two or three months. [Signed A. L. P.]


London; Dear Mrs. Roberts, At the request of D. Stoll, Director of the Kunsthalle, Basle, the British Coundil has agreed to assemble a large exhibition of contemporary British art [Signed John Hulton]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis: Sir Gerald Campbell has asked me to answer your letter of June 28th, as he has left for England. [Signed John Foster]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis: Thank you for your letter of July 31st enclosing your article. I shall write you shortly on this [Signed John Foster]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis; With reference to your letter of July 31st kindly enclosing an article, I am writing to say that we were much interested in the article [Signed John Foster]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis: Your letter of September 12 to Mr. Vernon McKenzie has reached this office. Mr. McKenzie left last Saturday for Seattle, [Signed Frances Cadzow]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis: I was delighted to get the pamphlet "Anglosaxony" which you kindly sent to me: although I have not had an opportunity of doing more than glancing through it yet, [Signed Robert Wilberforce]


Toronto; Dear Mr. Lewis: I have pleasure in enclosing cheque for ..$200.00 covering the balance due on the Portrait.


Ottawa; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis: Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis: I am so very sorry that owing to my absence from the city I have left for so long a time


Ottawa; My dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis: I am so very sorry that owing to my absence from the city and subsequent illness I have been unable to reply to your letter.


Ottawa; My dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis: I am sorry that I forgot to return the supplement, but herewith remedy the omission. I have continued to hope


Ottawa; My dear Wyndham Lewis: I thank you for your letter. I will do whatever I can when I return from the West, for which I am leaving tomorrow.


Ottawa; My dear Wyndham Lewis: I had lunch today with Mr. Norman Robertson, the Under Secretary of State for External Affairs, and put up your case with enthusiasm.


Ottawa; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis: I am sorry I have been unable to reply to your letter before. I found two friends at the External Affairs Department,


Ottawa; Dear Wyndham Lewis: I was very glad to receive your note. I had been expecting a little memorandum from you in order that I might see what could be done.


New Haven; Dear Mr. Lewis, You may be sure that I will be happy to do anything that I can toward bringing you for a visit to this country.


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis. I have just learned the sad news of your husband's death. I had not heard that he was ill the last few weeks.


London; I wonder if you are still there, or if I haven't let you get lost by not answering you for so long. I was sorry about the introductions at Munick -I only know one person there


Torquay; /Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis. Thank you so much for the lovely plant you gave me. I am sorry I could not thank you in person but I had quite a [With a thank you note of 18.7.77 for peaches.]


Londonderry; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I was sorry to read in "The Listener" of your decreasing sight and that you will not write there on art exhibitions any more.


London; Dear Sir, On behalf of my blind friend, I am writing to tell you we are in proud possission of your wonderful articl, "Sea Mists of the Winter".


Buffalo; Dear Mr. Lewis, Some moths ago, I took the liberty of writing to you on behalf of the Lockwood Memorial Library's collection of materials [Signed C. D. Abbott]


Buffalo; Dear Mr. Lewis, The Lockwood Memorial Library, as you may remember from letters we have written you before, will provide scholars [Signed C. D. Abbott]


Natchez; Dear Lewis: Here we are, at last homeward-bound and dog-tired and ready for a rest and longing for the farm & a little peace.[Signed C. D. Abbott]


Chicago; Dear Lewis: (You don't mind if I drop the Mr., do you?) Swazay writes that you are having troubles about a studio, which amazes me somewhat, [Signed C. D. Abbott]


Buffalo; My dear Lewis, Everything went wrong at the end of our trip. But the particular and principal wrongness was that I just plain broke down. [Signed C. D. Abbott]


Buffalo; Dear Lewis, The name of the woman who was to ring you up was Florence Codman, who is the head of "Arrow Editions" [Signed C. D. Abbott]


Buffalo; Dear Lewis, Spring seems at last to have reached upper New York State, and Theresa and I are wondering whether you and your wife [Signed C. D. Abbott]


Buffalo; Dear Lewis, Good! Theresa and I are both hoping that we shall see all of you next week. The daffodils are bravely out and the lilacs will soon be [Signed C. D. Abbott]


Buffalo; Dear Lewis, I was later in getting back from the south than I expected to be, and the work which had accumulated here was terrific. [Signed C. D. Abbott]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, As I have not heard anything further from you for some time, I express the hope that everything is moving to your satisfaction.[With Statement.]


Manchester; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I must firstly apologise for troubling you. With the upsurge of interest in Vorticism you must have been inundated with requests


Toronto; Dear Mr. Lewis- Before your journey to Windsor I think I recall sending you a little clipping about a man called Barrois who had left Msgr. Sheen's school,


Toronto; Dear Mr. Lewis- Reading Saturday Night through from front to back, I had the advantage of going through Mr. Peterson's saddening article


Toronto; Dear Mr. Lewis- I was delighted to receive your letter and your good wishes for which thanks, indeed. I owed you a letter, but the December period is so intense


Toronto; Dear Mr. Lewis- I am happy to know that you have surmounted the minor distresses incident to the moving, and are settled down in tolerable surroundings


Toronto; Dear Mr. Lewis- I am sorry to hear of the troubles you have had in getting a roof overhead and hope you may now be comfortable.


Toronto; Dear Mr. Lewis- I am very glad to hear from you today and to know that you are doing tolerably well in spite of the tremendous obstacles


Toronto; Dear Mr. Lewis- I should have asknowledged your kind letter of Aug.17 sooner: however when one belongs to a family that is as the sand of the seashore


Toronto; Dear Mr. Lewis- I am glad to hear that you are back in St. Louis, and presumably enjoying painting again. No, thank you very much, the portrait project does not appeal to me.


London; Dear Sir, Your application has been duly put before the Committee for election. The Company however refuse their consent to your being made an Honorary Member


London; Richards asks me to see you about matter you wrote him stop leaving for Holland immediately stop hope ou can elephone Connaught Hotel


London; Dear Madam, You will perhaps remember my telephone call to you yesterday afternoon enquiring for work as a copy typist. During the course of our conversation


Lanarkshire, Scotland; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I must apologise for the unconscionable delay in writing to you. Regrettably I have been more than snowed under with work


London; [10 Royalty statements for Lewis' writings.]


London; [Correspondence regarding Lewis' writings.]


London; Dear Lewis. I'm sorry we have to go out. If you will leave a note as to what you wish done about a cheque [Signed Edgell Rickword]


London; Dear Sir. You may be interested to hear that a new literary review, THE CALENDAR, is to be brought out in April, [Signed Edgell Rickword]


London; Dear Sir, Some time ago I wrote to you with regard to this paper, but I am uncertain if the letter was forwarded [Signed Edgell Rickword]


London; Dear Sir, I am glad that you are willing to contribute to the Calendar and I have considered the piece of work you mention [Signed Edgell Rickword]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. I should very much like to publish the piece of criticism you left with me, as I think it is of very great interest. [Signed Edgell Rickword]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. I am sorry to have kept your essay in the dark so long but we did not want to waste it [Signed Edgell Rickword]


Radnorshire; Dear Lewis. This place is much better than I expected and I'm very satisfied with the change [Signed Edgell Rickword]


London; Dear Lewis. I am sorry you have been unable to come up this afternoon. Will you let me have yor copy as early as you can [Signed C. H. Rickword]


London; Dear Lewis, When are you going to give us another book? I ask partly for practical reasons, as I want to know [Signed Edgell Rickword]


Penypont; Dear Lewis. Very glad to hear from you. Yes, it is worth while cleaning up the garbage - when it can be done [Signed Edgell Rickword]


London; Dear Lewis. Is there any chance of seeing you now that I am in London again? I should very much like to talk to you. [Signed Edgell Rickword]


London; Dear Lewis.Many thanks for your note. I'm sorry you haven't anything for us now but I hope that we may look forward [Signed Edgell Rickword]


London; Dear Lewis. Has The Enemy cornered all your work, or could you let me have an article on some contemporary writer [Signed Edgell Rickword]


London; Dear Lewis. Certainly make what alterations are essential, keeping them down as much as you can. [Signed Edgell Rickword]


Edinburgh; Dear Mr. Lewis, I am writing on behalf of the member of this society (it's the college literary society0 [Signed Karl Miller]


Coulson; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, We should be most grateful if you would care to come to Cambridge some time [Signed David A. Matthews]


Coulson; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you very much for your letter accepting our invitation to address the English Club. [Signed David A. Matthews]


Cambridge; Dear Sir, I have assumed that Wednesday 25th October was in fact convenient for your visit [Signed David A. Matthews]


Cambridge; My dear Eliot, I hear from Ivor Richard that you and he have had some conversation about the appropriate framing [Signed Henry Willink]


London; Dear Lewis. I only got your letter a few days ago, owing to a change of address. The place I was in at Hampstead


London; Dear Lewis. I see that you are lecturing in Canada & that these lectures are always given by someone


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis. As I think you alread know, we are organising a major exhibition under the title of VORTICISM AND ITS ALLIES


[n.p.] My dear Lewis, I am so sorry to take so long in fixing up anything with Greenwood: I don't seem to be able to get an appointment


London; My dear Lewis, I am awfully sorry but I have just had orders to lay on a poetry programme from 7 till 8.30 on Thursday


Lisbon; After a terrible crossing we are very glad to be here. It is a beautiful town & at the moment almost like being in Spain,


Martiques, France; My dear Lewis, I am delighted to hear of your recovery. Gray told me that you were in hospital


Weald, Sevenoaks; My dear Lewis, Thanks for your letter. I shall be in London this Saturday but only for a few hours.


[n.p.] My dear Lewis, At last I have managed to reconstruct the Albatross, which I enclose: I shall start on G. & R. whenever you like.


[n.p.] My dear Lewis, I can't send you the Albatross today. I can't remember yet the last four verses. Yours was the only copy


[n.p.] My dear Lewis, I'm laid up & shan't be in London for a month or two. I have a pretty serious operation tomorrow


[n.p.] My dear Lewis, Please forgive me for not sending the Albatross sooner.I'll try to get it off tomorrow.


Weald, Sevenoaks; Dear Lewis, I enclose the poem I promised you. It seems to me, on re-copying it, that it comes off all right.


Weald, Sevenoaks; Dear Lewis, Your wire relieved me of a certain amount of anxiety. My wife has always liked the Albatross;


Weald, Sevenoaks; My dear Lewis, I have made a big stride in my essay and am no longer doubtful about it.[With poem.]


Weald, Sevenoaks; My dear Lewis, I'm awfully sorry for keeping you waiting so long. I'm only half-way through yet with Graves


Martigues, France; My dear Lewis, Thank you very much for the Enemy. I was very impressed with what you write


Martigues, France; My dear Lewis, Your arrangements suit me very well. I have said nothing about your visit


Martigues, France; Dear Lewis, The N. Statesman has just sent me "Paleface" to review. It had evidently been out to someone else


Martigues, France; My dear Lewis, Thanks for your wire. I have no photos of myself except this one taken by the newspapers


Martigues, France; I may be coming to London in 8 weeks or so for a fortnight. I have given up any thought of bullfighting


Martigues, France; My dear Lewis, The last enemy is magnificent. I have never read even in your work such a very complete and successful attack.


Martigues, France; My dear Lewis, Thanks for your letter. I enclose a poem which I hope is all right. I had a slight accident


Martigues, France; My dear Lewis, I wrote my letter in a moment of anxiety: but there is absolutely no need now to send me anything.


London; I shall call round at five tomorrow (Thursday) if you are ill or busy don't worry to come down. I shall bring my wife


Martigues, France; My dear Lewis, I have written to accept Prentice's suggestion. I shall be here till June but let me know when,


Martigues, France; My dear Lewis, Ellis Roberts seems to have turned a somersault; his review in places seems to paraphrase the one he rejected.


Martigues, France; My dear Lewis, I have not yet received the Apel of God. I should be glad if you would drop me a card


Martigues, France; My dear Lewis,I wonder if you still entend your trip to the Pyrennees and if there is any chance of your coming


Martigues, France; My dear Lewis, The Apes of God is great. I am half-way through the review of it already. I think it is the most important


Martigues, France; My dear Lewis, Thanks for the lampoon. It is a belated reply to the fragment of The Gourmet which appeared in the "book"


Martigues, France; My dear Lewis, For the present I have my work cut out with "Time and Western Man", "The Art of Being Ruled",


Martigues, France; My dear Lewis, Thanks very much for your letter. Your cable was a generous thought from so far away


Martigues, France; My dear Lewis, Review to follow. Excise what you want to from Preface. Not a word from Marshall


Martigues, France; My dear Lewis, Thanks for yolur enquiries about my health. Don't worry about Wina -


Martigues, France; My dear Lewis, Cape has not yet decided about my W. L. Can you suggest anyone? Any price will do as long as we get it out


Martigues, France; My dear Lewis, 1,000 thanks for getting me off with Harmsworth. I am delighted with Rob! and sorry if I gave you any impression to the contrary


Barcelona; My dear Lewis, One Way is great Stuff! It takes some time to get the hang of it as it is so packed. The "puff-puff" song is amazingly good,


Barcelona; My dear Lewis, Thanks for your last two letters. I saw Macleod for a minute and liked him. We are meeting later. You "One Way Song" gets better every time I read it


Altea, Alicante; My dear Lewis, I have not heard from you for so long that I hope your no-news is good news. I got rid of my prose some months ago


Altea, Alicante; My dear Lewis, I seem to have got into heaven - with no debts, nothing annoying or troublesome. But I had a fierce time of it for some months.


Binstead, Sussex; My dear Lewis, Meeting you and your wife had a very salutary effect: and Mary rang up twice to thank you for sending me back


Arundel, Sussex; I wrote you a long letter but decided to keep it as it was sent back. Please try to come on Monday, and let us know which train.


Binstead, Sussex; My dear Lewis, We shall turn up about half past two to three. mary may not be able to come up again. But she can stay while you want her.


[Toledo]; Sorry to have been so slack in writing, but what should have been an essay is now a tome & things have been too exciting. I read "Count Your Dead".


Toledo; My dear Lewis, I was thrilled to get your letter. You bet I am game for anything you like!!! I have just sent off the biggest book of poems I ever wrote,


Algarve, Portugal; My dear Lewis, I wonder how you are getting on. I have just sent off a Ms. "Resurgimiento" of 5000 lines of which is to be published on Oct. 18


Rome; My dear Lewis, I hope you got the Ms. I told Longmans to send you. I see that it is terribly mixed up in the typing and that some pages in the 100's are mixed up


Bormes, Var, France; My dear Lewis, Sorry, the article referred to was in Noumber 4 (not 5) of the Catacomb. I am down here hunting wild boars with Charles


London; My dear Lewis, Have you seen this review? (There is an article on you by Rob Lyle in No. 5.) We are going to turn it into a quarterly [With TLS to Campbell for Erich Heller, May 8th, 1950.]


London; My dear Lewis, Many thanks for your letter which I would have answered before only I've just got back. It was very nice to know that you liked the review


Sintra, Portuagl; My dear Lewis, Henry Regnery and his wife and daughter stayed here with us and we went on to Spain together and had a fine time


Durban, South Africa; I was very glad I called and saw you again in London, to renew the old acquaintance. I have been in Mozambique


Toronto; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis: This Company is the Executor of the Estate of the late Douglas M. Duncan. In this connection your letter of September 2, 1968 has been referred to me.


Ottawa; Dear Mr. Lewis, I have given further thought to your suggestion that you should cover purely Canadian was industry activities. And despite my mental struggles, [Signed Rielle Thomson]


Ottawa; Dear Mr. Lewis, Thank you kindly for your note dated January 20, 1943. The date on your letter reveals the inherent conservatism of the British. [Signed Rielle Thomson]


Ottawa; Dear Sir: For its collection of war paintings, the British Government has commissioned Mr. Wyndham Lewis to portray scenes [Signed Rielle Thomson]


Ottawa; Dear Downman: The British Government has commissioned Mr. Wyndham Lewis, now in Toronto at the Tudor Hotel [Signed Rielle Thomson]


Toronto; Dear Mr. Lewis: I am directed by the Prime Minister to acknowledge receipt of your letter of recent date. As you may know, [Signed R. H. Elmhirst]


You will proceed to Paris together with Lieut. Wyndham Lewis and report to the Office i/c Canadian War Records, Hotel Bristol.


Montreal; Dear Mr. Lewis:- I am informed by Mr. Rielle Thomson, Department of Munitions and Supply, Ottawa, that you have been commissioned [Signed C. P. C. Downman]


Vancouver; Dear Mrs. Lewis: I am writing to tell you that I have decided to devote a special issue of "Canadian Literature" to the subject of "Wyndham Lewis in Canada" [3 letters (July 27, September 5, 1967) all signed by George Woodcock]


London; Dear Sir, Referring to our telephone conversation this afternoon concerning certain packages consigned to you from Canada. [Signed J. Buchan]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis:- Attached hereto is copy of telegram received from Headquarters, Canadians, to-day. You will please proceed to France [Signed J. Harold Watkins]


London; Dear Lewis, I propose to bring Captain Lima round to see your picture in the morning about 12.oclock and hope you will be able to be in then. [Signed J. Harold Watkins]


Detroit; Dear Mr. Lewis, I am so glad that you spent a profitable afternoon at the Art Gallery with Valentiner and his assistant, Richardson.


Detroit; Dear Mr. Lewis, Many thanks for the "Smackers", two in number, which arrived quite safely in the form of a money order. Have you made any further contacts


New York; Dear Lewis, I have delayed some time in answering your letter because of wanting to hit upon some university that might apply for your as "resident artist."


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, THE ROARING QUEEN. I am sorry the position is not clear to you. The advice we received was to the effect that the restricted range of the motif [Signed G. Wren Howard]


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you for your letter of August 3rd. I confirm that the contract for your late husband's novel THE ROARING QUEEN


Buffalo; My dear Mr. Lewis. I am sorry to have delayed at all in answering your kind note - but I have been much occupied with an ailing nephew


Buffalo; Dear Mr. Lewis: Thank you very much for telling me where you may be found in New York. I am not sure when I shall be there again,


Oslo; [Royalty Statement for The Demon of Progress in T. with copy of same.]


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis. I have been in touch recently with Mr. Fox who suggested I write to you again about Carcanet's hopes to publish SELF-CONDEMNED and ONE WAY SONG. [Signed Michael Schmidt]


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis. Charles Sisson lent me your late husband's ONE WAY SONG in connection with a book I am preparing for Pan Books [With 4 other letters to Lewis from Cancanet Press (July 3, July 25,Oct.1, 1974 and April 29, 1975) all signed by Michael Schmidt.]


Cap Arcona; Dear Wyndham Lewis. I'm sorry I did not see you before we left, but everything was such a rush at the last moment. I wanted to come in for the books too


London; Dear W. L. I am sending you this little token of esteem and gratitude by hand, as I feel it is more likely to arrive safely than if sent by post


London; Dear W. L. I have been on to Lord Lloyd today to ask him about you. He has asked me to write him a line saying who you are, what you want,


London; Dear W. L. Am sorry not to have been able to get on to you yesterday. I tried twice but both times I received the engaged signal.





London; Dear Wyndham Lewis. Thank you so much for yesterday evening. - both the profs and your pleasant company, I enjoy one as much as the other.


Montreal; Dear W. L. Thank you for your two letters. I shall have to do some thinking before I can give you an answer. My expenses are so rigorously contracted


Oban, Scotland; Dear W. L. A short note to you, while I am recovering from a rather heavy dinner. We came up here very much on the spur of the moment.


Stornoway, Isle of Lewis; Dear W. L. I'm sorry I couldn't come and see you before leaving the other day. Everything was so chaustic, with mama on the telephone


Scilly Isles; Dear W. L. This is where we are. A glorious place, baking hot, clear blue sea & sky. Thousands of islands of sandy bays


London; Dear W. L., Since talking to you on the telephone yesterday morning, I have been thinking about the book. The title at the present moment is 'THE ROLE OF LINE IN ART',


Montreal; Dear W. L. A note to tell you how delighted I was to see you again, after this long time. That evening we spent together was the most refreshing,


London; Dear W. L. The last letter I received from you just missed me in Finland and agin in Lisbon but caught up with me here. You saound sad and depressed.


Estoril, Portugal; Dear W. L. I appear to be only about three days travelling away from you, which is the nearest for very many moths. Also I cannot spend those three days


Helsingfors; Dear W. L. I have been meaning to write to you for a long time, but in this remote place, one is apt to be cut off from civilisation. Besides that letters come and go


Helsingfors; Delighted hear from you book not out yet as you have several pages to correct and colophon to sign will get Peggy to send proofs


Montreal; Arriving 530 train hope you can dine with me.


New York; Dear Mr. Leffingwell: I think that Mr. Wyndham Lewis, in his letter of September 25th to Mrs. Lamont, referes to the resident artist plan [Signed Charles Dollard]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis: It was entirely in order for you to write to me, and I am glad that you did so. Dexter Keezer has separated himself from Reed College, [Signed Charles Dollard]


London; Dear Michael, As promised, I enclose cheque in favour of Mrs. Wyndham Lewis for [pounds]80 for the drawings which I bought last night.


Columbia, MO; Dear P. W. L., Its long since we met and our paths have been divergent as to country but I have an idea that things are clos as regards Life.


[n.p.] ... somewhat larger amounts of money. By later, I mean towards the end of next month. Kenner said you could use some extra cash --


[n.p.] Dear Mr. Lewis, The short story and your letter received. I like the story very much, and am pleased by your consideration in not offering it to anyone in England;


Martinsville, VA; Dear Mr. Lewis, Let me offer my sincerest congratulations for "The Human Age", which I read about a month ago.


Nashville, TN; Dear Mr. Lewis, I'm sorry to bother you, but I must ask a sort of favor. You might remember I said I was doing a piece on "The Human Age" for the Kenyon Review.


Cheltenham; My dear Mary, I have received your letter of the 16th inst. and altho' I thank you for the kind expressions it contains, and can assure you


[n.p.]; [Christmas card]


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you for your letter of 30th November. I am so pleased that you agree to our reprinting THE ENEMY, THE TYRO and BLAST. [With 5 other letters, Jan.12, ; Feb. 20,; May 21, 1968; Jan.8, 1970; and May 5, 1970.]


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I enclose a letter from a gentleman in America who whhes to use some material from MEN WITHOUT ART [Signed Anne Parkin]


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I attach a letter from a a Mr. Elliott of Ohio State University who wishes to quote some material from MEN WITHOUT ART. [With Elliott's letter and list of quotes he wishes to use.]


London; Dear Sir, Thank you for your letter of 20th March requesting permission to quote passages from two works by Wyndham Lewis [Sent to G. Anne (Hoskyns) Lewis with "Complimentary" note from Cassell for her permission.]


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, As we should very much like to reproduce a black and white print of the self portrait of Wyndham Lewis as Tyro, [With 4 other letters, April 28,; May 2,; Sept. 6, 1972]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis. Many thanks for your letter. With regard to a date for the delivery of your manuscript [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Sir, In reply to your letter of the 11th instant, I have pleasure in submitting a list of payments [Signed George Felmingham]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis [Signed H. Auberlpentey?]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis Could you dine with us at 2 Gordon Place (W8) on either Friday next, [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis It is with surprise and chagrin that I hear from my wife, that the Eifel Tower waiters [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis Thank you so much for yr letter. May we come Wednesday? [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis The woman representing Coward McCann is Miss Elizabeth Houlter and Joseph Bard [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis When we lunched last week, I forgot to fix anything about our lunch with Margaret [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis Thank you for your note. The Rothernsteins are coming in to see us after dinner tomorrow [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis Just a quick line which may catch you in the morning, to say that we want to do your book, [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis Thank you so much for "One Way Song". It is very good of you to send it, [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis Many thanks for your letter. I am very sorry indeed to hear that you have been having a bad time, [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis As I told you, I was away yesterday. My father cam back yesterday, but is away today[Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis I am happy to say that we are preparing a contract for "Satire & Fiction" allowing for an advance [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis I very much regret that I have not yet got a decision on the money question. [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Referring to our talk to-day, I write to say that I shall be very pleased to enter into an agreement [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis Many thanks for your letter of April 10th. I am sorry that it has not been possible [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis Thank you very much for your letter. I am indeed glad that the agreement has been arrived at, [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis Many thanks for your letter. I am so sorry that my evenings are quite full this week.[Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis Thank you for your letter, which I was glad to receive as I had had no word from you [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis I am so sorry that I was tied up today when you called. I have not had an opportunity of reading [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis Many thanks for your letter. I am so sorry that you have struck trouble. [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis Could you pay us a visit on Wednesday morning to talk about "Snooty"? [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis Many thanks for your note. I am sorry the "Snooty" proofs went astray [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; My dear Wyndham Lewis I am sorry I was out when you 'phoned to-day. I hear that all sorts of people want to bleed you [Signed Newman Flower]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis I wish you would change the name Gollanx to something else - between ourselves, [Signed Evelyn N. Flower]


London; Dear Lewis I have just had introducaed to my Mr. Floyd Van Vuren, literary edition of the Milwaukee Journal, [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis Thanks for your letter. I am very sorry I was unable to attend the show, [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; My dear Wyndham Lewis, Have you finished your poem? You promised to let me have it at the end of September, [Signed Newman Flower]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I did not refer to the portrait [?] when I wrote to you the other day - [Signed Newman Flower]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis I enclose a copy of a letter we have just received (a copy, you). I have written to Piehler [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis Thank you for your letter of June 14. It was good to hear from you after such a long time. [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis Thank you for your letter and the [pounds]50. Our official receipt is enclosed [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis In connection with the above exhibition I am organising a loan exhibit of rare books and MSS., [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis Thank you for your letter. It is good of you to promis the loan of a MS. I should like part of a book [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis It was a pleasure to hear from you that your operation has gone off well [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis Thank you so much for the parcel of drawings and the proof of page 88 duly altered. [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis I realise fully the difficulties under which you are labouring following your illness, [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; I am making good progress with and enjoying "False Bottoms", but I glad shd [?] another 48 hrs on it, [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; DearWyndham I have, I am afraid, a disappointment for you. We had both forgotten that some time ago you instructed us [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Lewis Thank you for your letter. Your protest at the delay is most diplomatically worded. [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Lewis Thank you for your letter of May 6th. I told you when I wrote last that I expected Boots' report on the book[Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Lewis I hear again from Symons that yo would prefer not to discuss the matter of your novel with him. [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis I would like to have a chat with you about your book. Would it be convenient for you [Signed Newman Flower]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis Many thanks for your letter. I am sorry there is no chance of seeing you before you go away, [Signed Newman Flower]


London; My dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Since I wrote to you some weeks ago about the novel, I see that you have published [Signed Newman Flower]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Thank you for the return of Galleys 1-21 of "Revenge for Love". We shall be wanting you to get the others [Signed J. H. P. Marks]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis Thank you for your leter of December 11th and further galleys, 25-49, of "The Revenge for Love". [Signed J. H. P. Marks]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Many thanks for sending me the galley-proofs of "The Revenge for Love". [Signed Arthur Heyward]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I am sending you page-proofs up to 104 of "The Revenge for Love". I notice on page 38 that Percy calls Serafin [Signed Arthur Heyward]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I am sending you the final batch of page-proofs of "The Revenge for Love". You will notice [Signed Arthur Heyward]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I am sorry to trouble you again but since writing earlier this afternoon I find the printers are holding [Signed Arthur Heyward]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I have discussed your proposition for an autobiographical book, to be called something like [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewi, Thank you for your letter of 9 September. With regard to "The Revenge for Love", we feel [Signed Desmond Flower]


London; Dear Sir, Mr. Geoffrey Wagner of 2310, second Avenue, New York 25, writes that he is doinga dissertation [C. A. E. Paget]


[n.p.] ..."Tyros and Portraits Exhibition Catalogue" (1937) "Exhibition Catalogue of Paintings by Wyndham Lewis" (1949) Again, let me emphasize myself lucky


[n.p.] ... With luck, I'll be able to get some kind of work in Ithaca, enough to add to any grant I secure, and to enable me to eke out a living there.


[n.p.] [Christmas card]


Chicago; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Please forgive my tardiness in answering your kind letter of August 29. I have been deep in labours both literary and domestic


Chicago; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Suddenly, everything is happening at once. I have just obtained the address of Ezra Pound (San Gregorio, 252; Venice) and would like to write him


Chicago; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Please forgive me for resorting to the perhaps overly dramatic device of registered mail, but I have begun to worry about an apparent breakdown


Chicago; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Every time I sit down to write you, the world seems to intervene. Since the first of the year, we have had a continuous run of minor illnesses in our family.


Chicago; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I write to say that I must regretfully cancel my trip to England for this summer. Lady Mitchison will not be available until late in July


Chicago; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Just after mailing the "Life" magazine to you I received "National Review" in the mail with a review of Mr. Michel's book on page 876.


[n.p.] Dear Mrs. Lewis, Thank you very much for both your letters. I hope you had a nice visit from Mr. Michel. His anthology of Lewis' writings on art


Ithaca, NY; Dear Mrs. Lewis, As you can see, my address has changed and I am now living in Ithaca, New York. About six weeks ago, much to my surprise,


Ithaca, NY; Dear Mrs. Lewis, We have not corresponded for some months now. I write to ask whether you will be willing to see me when I visit England


Ithaca, NY; Dear Mrs. Lewis, It was nice to hear from you after so long. Apparently you neglected to place a stamp on your letter, so it travelled by sea instead of air.


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I am at long last settled here in London; the above is my permanent addresse for the next six weeks or so. If we are to meet,


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I apologize for using this stationery, but I am out of the regular kind and all the stores are closed. Would the week-end of Saturday 25 and Sunday 26


Torquay, England; Could not reach you telephone arrive Sunday.


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, It is too bad that I had to rush away so quickly yesterday. It would have been pleasant to continue


Ithaca, NY; Dear Mrs. Lewis, First let me apolgize for taking so very long with these photographs. I had a terrible time getting them copied


Ithaca, NY; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I do not think I have heard from you since last summer when we met in Torquay. The biography of Lewis progresses;


Evanston, Ill.; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I do not know how long it has been since we last corresponded, but it must be about two years.


Chicago; Dear Miss Lovenberg, FLASH! As I was going through my files the other day, I unearthed the great-great-grandfather of Percy Wyndham Lewis. [Sent to Susan Lovenburg at Special Collections]


London; Dear Percy. I understand from your mother that it is better to order Blast direct from you. Will you please send us a copy?


London; Dear Percy. We got back yesterday after a most pleasant fortnight at Sidmonth. I had to see my solicitor this morning


London; Muy señor mio: En relación con su interesante libro "America and Cosmic Man", tengo el encargo de mi estimado amigo,


Manchester; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, I am responsible for teaching the history of twentieth century art in this university,


Manchester; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, You kindly offered to let me come and see you about your husband's painting


Manchester; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Thank yuou for your letter. I will come at 11.00 am on Friday, the 28th.


New York; Union Bank of Scotland London instructs us to pay you [pounds] 117-18-3 on identification against receipt


Board the "Mauretania"; Dear Mr. Lewis. Before leaving England I tried to ring you several times, but got no reply,


[n.p.] ... course be part of an informal correspondence and although any additional factual information would be welcome [numbered 5 & 6]


Reading; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis. A great deal had happened since I last wrote (a card from Paris I think). Lisa and I got married there,


Uxbridge; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis. I though I'd get these books which we mentioned, bofore I wrote to thank you


Uxbridge; Just a note to thank you once again for thinking of me and generously sending the new publications.


Uxbridge; Dear Mrs. Lewis. Thanks very much for your letter. I have just come up to my parents house cand find your very welcome communication,


[n.p.] Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis.I am writing to confirm what we discussed by telephone, namely that I have the honor of going around


Uxbridge; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis. As you can see I have discovered a W.L. exhibition on my regular Private Gallery tours.


Paris; I don't know whether I told you we hoped to stay at the [?] Shakespeare & Co. bookshop. When we went to Paris again but here we are.


Uxbridge; Dear Mrs. Lewis. Just a note to wish you well for Christmas etc. How are you? Did you get the Mayor Gallery catalogue?


Uxbridge; Dear Mrs. Lewis. This note is just to recommend the gent. who's writing from the land of the melting-pot.


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis. We have net once or twice but I do not suppose that you remember me. I am writing to congratulate you


New York; My dear Miss Moir, Miss Stringfellow has asked me to thank you for your letter. We are very sorry that our calendar of lectures [Signed Mary M. McClung]


Kent; Dear Mrs. Lewis, We discovered your scarf in the kitchen after you had left. I am so sorry for the delay in sending it on to you.


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I shall be here on Friday the 16th if you can manage to come in then with your manuscript. [Signed Alec Waugh]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Of course I did not in the least resent your request that you manuscript should be shown to as few people as possible. [Signed Alec Waugh]


Kent; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I forgot to ask you on the phone, but could I trouble you to give me some sort of formal written permission


Kent; Dear Mrs. Lewis, This is just a note to thank you for your help to Cy Fox and myself in preparing the "Unlucky for Pringle" collection.


Kent; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I've been meaning to write to you for some time. Cy Fox mentioned to me that you were wondering about copyright


Kent; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Thank you for your letter. I'm amazed that the books in Rota's catalogue have come into their hands


Kent; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Many thanks for your letter and the copy of TAMESIS you sent to me: Edward Chaey seems a real live-wire,


Kent; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Thank you for your kind letter about my book: I'm very pleased you liked it & I'd like to thank you again


Kent; Dear Mrs. Lewis, This is just a note to thank you once again for your great kindness. Your generosity more than repays the editing


Northampton; Dear Mrs Lewis, How are you? I've been meaning to write for ages, but we seem to have been "settling in"


[n.p.]; ... Paisley doesn't like it when we go on holiday. He can't travel, so he must go into kennels (the one he visits is called "The Cat Hotel",


Northampton; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I've been meaning to write to you for a while - to thank you for your tip about the woodworm.


[n.p.] To Mrs. Lewis [Christmas card]


[n.p.] Dear Mrs. Lewis, I hope you are keeping fit: the winter is really setting in up in the wilds of the midlands -


Northampton; Dear Mrs. Lewis, First of all, thank you very much for the telegram of congratulations: Thomas will be very proud of that when he grows up.


Northampton; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I hope you are keeping well (and that neither the weather nor inflation is getting you down). The time seems to have flashed past since last Christmas


Lanarkshire, Scotland; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Please excuse the use of this printed reminder. Unfortunately, pressure of work renders it impossible for me to write individually.


Lanarkshire, Scotland; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Dear Mrs. Lewis, I write to request your assistance with a project we are considering for the next year, part of our new series


[n.p.] ... medium of English prose - which in its strength and melody recalled to many of them familiar passages in the Psalms or Solomon's Song.


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Many thanks for your letter which was quite unnecessary. I only hope that the letter to the Times will have the required effect.


Chicago; Dear Father Murphy: Thank you many times for your kind letter of April 25. I am sorry that absence in Arizona has prevented me from telling you sooner


Norfoalk, Va.; Dear Wyndham: You probably think I forgot all about your request. I did not. Tried to get in touch with the cousin who knew the address you wanted.


Oakville, Ont.; My dear Aunt Annie. When Grandmother Lewis died she left a small piece of property which as she died without a will, goes to her children and their heirs.[With quit claim for the property.]


Oakville, Ont.;My dear Aunt Annie. Your letter of Jany 26th came duly to had but it was about the time mother and I were starting for Colorado


Eechless; My Dearest Annie. I can scarcely realize that Christmas is just at hand again and that it is my privilege to wish you and your mother and Percy a "merry Christmas"


Oakville, Ont.; My dear Annie. Imagine my chagrin and disgust about two weeks ago to have la letter I had written to you returned to me. It was one I had sent


Oakville Ont.; My Dear Annie. I wrote to you from Colorado Springs in August. The wather [?] not.


Oakville, Ont.; My Dearest Annie. I know not if I am the first to break to you the news of our dear George's death my beloved brother. It is a loss so terrible


Oakville, Ont.; My Dearest Annie. I am afraid I am late in getting off our Christmas greetings to you and Percy and your good mother but not too late to wish you all a happy New Year.


Oakville, Ont.; My Dear Annie. I had just finished writing a number of letters when your very welcome letter was brought in. I feel impelled to sit right down again


Oakville, Ont.; My Dear Annie. How time flies. It seems to me but a few weeks since I was visisting you my Christmas greetings for 1900. We lead such busy lives


Buffalo; My Dear Annie. I cannot begin to tell you how glad I was to get your dear good letter and to know something about you. I was away from home


Oakville, Ont.; My dear Annie. Here is another year gone. The days of our youth further and further away in the dim distance a few mere "air battles" demolished


Oakville, Ont.; My Dear Annie. I am truly greatly distressed at the contents of your letter received a few days ago. I sent it to Albert. He writes me that he will try and find Charlie.


Oakville, Ont.; My Dear Annie. It has been a long time since we have heard from you. I had lost your address or I would have written you before.


Oakville, Ont.; ...me near what your plans are. And when we may expect you perhaps you can get Mary to come with you. That would be lovely


Oakville, Ont.; My Dear Charlie. We were greatly surprised and pleased to hear you were in New York. I can easily imagine the lovely visit you and Mary will have together


Leicester; [Sparks?] letter telegraphing thirty pounds Atle good propose using it setting page form and netting printers to correct please cable reply writing [Signed Prentice]


London; Dear Sir, May we remind you that we are still awaiting the MS. of your Appreciation of Mr. Gilman. The Exhibition opens before the end of this month, [Signed Chatto & Windus GAS.]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, The firm has asked me to write to you to say that we would very much like to publish "The Art of Being Ruled". [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Here is the Form of Agreement. I hope you will find it quite in order. If so, will you please date it, sign it before a witness, [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Many thanks for your telegram and your two letters. I am very glad that the Agreement appears to you quite all right [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Very many thanks for your letter. I am extremely sorry that you have had this worry about the typing of the MS., but shall look forward to receiving the whole of it [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I am now putting in hand our Spring Announcement List. Do you think you could let me have the Agreement and typescript soon for "The Art of Being Ruled"? [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Many thanks for your kind letter. I shall be in tomorrow afternoon (Wednesday) and will be delighted to see you any time [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Very many thanks for your letter. Thursday will be quite all right. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I have now been through the revied MS., I fear very hurriedly, and I can find nothing in it which would make us want to delay sending it [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Yesterday evening you said that you would cut off from your MS. the little figure that is to go on the title page and take it away [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Many thanks for your kind letter, which I very much appreciate. And thank you too for the press notices of "Tarr" and your other works. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, The page has been passed, and you may expect your first batch of proofs before Christmas, possibly by Wednesday morning; [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Many thanks for the drawing. I think I did prefer the original, but the revised version may come out better than the original, [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Many thanks for the proofs of pp. 129-240 (sigs. I to P). Will you please let me have sig. H [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Many thanks for the correction for page 39. I hope, however, that I did not mislead you on Friday [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Many thanks for putting me right about "The Irish Staesman", and for giving me Sullivan's address, [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Many thanks for the biographical details and for your letter. I shall expect the photographs shortly. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, It's certainly going to be a remarkable & astonishing book. I am afraid I can't judge the typescript chapter [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Here is the Zagreus material. The "Lenten Party at Lord Osmond's" bit is incomplete; [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis,We are enclosing for your kind attention an enquiry from Mrssrs. Rütten & Loening, Frankfort [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Is Part I of the novel finished yet? I am now back, and very anxious to read it when it is. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Many thanks for your letter of the 11th. I wrote to your London address the other day, [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I am very glad to hear that you are back again and that the novel is now practically finished; [Signed C. H. Prentice]





London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I expect you have been wondering what has happened to the first account for "The Art of Being Ruled". [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Many thanks for your kind letter and for accepting our suggestion about the printer's charges for corrections. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, The difference between the cost of looking out, folding and collated two copies [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I have been away for a short holiday and have just come back. Is it possible that the novel has been finished? [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, "Der Querschnitt" wish to translate and publish Chapter 5 of "The Art of Being Ruled". [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I am afraid we have got nothing so far out of Sir Maxwell Hicks, and I am very sorry too because I read "The Lion and the Fox" [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Mr. Prentice has recently undergone a slight operation, from which he is rapidly recovering. [Signed Chatto & Windus]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I have now read "The Revolutionary Simpleton" and greatly look forward to seeing the completion. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Thank you very much for the drawing. It fascinates me, & I shall feel very proud of having it on the Menu [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I enclose the drawing, and a couple of pulls of the black. Will you please let me know at your earliest convenience [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I have pleasure in enclosing six of the menus, and a couple of proofs on white paper. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Many thanks for your note. I had not forgotten "The Enemy" No.2. We have been getting out an estimate, [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Many thanks for your letter. I am greatly distressed about "The Enemy", and I beg you not to draw from my letter [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I have read Book II of "Time and Western Man" with the greatest admiration and enjoyment. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Very many thanks for your kind letter of Wednesday; and for the copy of the American "Nation", [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I enclose the proposed agreement for "Time and Western Man". It follows the agreement for "The Art of Being Ruled" [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Many thanks for your kind letter. I am afraid I shall be away from London this weekend; [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, "Time and Western Man" went to the printers at the beginning of the week. I told them to arrange for half titles in front [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Thank you for your letter. I am very glad to know that I understood your instructions correctly regarding the arrangement of the book. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, The first 16 pages of the proofs of "Time and Western Man" went to you last week, and a further batch of 32 goes to you today; [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Many thanks for your letter. I shall be very glad to get the extra pages for the "Object" chapter. Do you think you could let me have them early [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Many thanks for the conclusion to "The Object as King". The addition certainly is an acquisition. It seems to me to round off the chapter [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I have much pleasure in sending you the draft Agreement for "The Wild Body". I hope you will find it perfectly satisfactory. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Sir, We beg to acknowledge your letter of August 1st enclosing list of corrections. We are dealing with this at once, and will write further [Signed Chatto & Windus]


Morar, Scotland; Dear Mr. Lewis, I am very glad to hear you are back again & that you have made satisfactory arrangements with Harcourt Brace for the publication of the two books. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I was rather horrified to see these further queries from the printers come in here this morning. I notice that they affect the second part [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I have been wanting to consult you about the material for our advertisement in the coming number of the Enemy. What I would suggest is [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I enclose copy for the advt. in the Enemy; please alter it, if there is anything that appears unsuitable. I should have mentioned that I am going away tomorrow [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Paleface is excellent: I have just a little bit more to read. It will make a splendid book, & I hope we may be allowed to arrange to publish it. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Many thanks for the first 136 pp. of The Wild Body. I have looked up "Corunna" in an atlas. It is spelt int his manner, which I take is the English; [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Many thanks for pp. 137-208 of the proofs of The Wild Body. I note that they are passed for press, with the exception of the fact [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I enclose herewith two sets of revise proofs of the first 96 pp. of The Wild Body, together with your original proofs. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, - May I drop the Mr.? - I feel I must write & thank you again for the privilege of listening to your reading last night & for the very remarkable pleasure I had from it. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Many thanks for your two letters and for the corrections to The Wild Body. We sent the corrections off last night, and I hope that some of them at any rate will have been in time. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, The Number Pages for The Wild Body have arrived. Could you please manage to call and sign them before you go away? [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, The Wild Body was published on Thursday. It is going well; up to this afternoon we have sold 812 copies. We printed a first edition of 2500. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Thanks very much for the two sets of notes on yourself. They will be most useful; they give me the very information I want, [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Many thanks for the photographs and for the copy of Father d'Arcy's review of Time and Western Man. I return the latter [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Thank you for your two letters and the proof of the prospectus passed for press. If I am unable to answer your letter about the literary side of The Childermass [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I am sorry I wasn't able to write yesterday - I was very busy clearing up points of office routine - & now I have just got through my calls [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Thanks very much for your letter. My suggestions were only small ones, but I am glad that you regard them so kindly. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I read last night the portion of "The Childermass" you left with me. I think your further work has been terrifically worth while. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, We have now had a copy made of the manuscript of pages 108-110 of "The Childermass", and we have pleasure in enclosing it. [Signed Chatto & Windus]


London; Dear Lewis, I am much perturbed by your letter, & I am very sorry you did not come in, as, I think, I could at any rate have made you feel less uneasy [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Here is the new page for The Childermass. It is supposed to be a facsimile of the Time and Western Man page minus one line. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I enclose a notice of the Childermas, which I intend to have printed on a sheet of paper and inserted into the leaflet about yourself. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Thank you for the two bundles of typescript of "The Childermass" you left at Earls Terrace yesterday evening. They have been sent on to the printer's today. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Many thanks for your letter. Skapta Jokul is marked in the Encyclopedia Britannica map as a glacier, but I don't see why there shouldn't be geysers [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Your revisions seem to be invariably felicitious. The last part of Section I comes out in the amplification better than ever. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Thank you for proofs pp. 61-8. A fresh batch goes to you today, & we are ordering the printers to expedite the remainder. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I have read through the rest of the slip proofs. I'm sorry I can't consult my partner about them till next week, but I do not observe anything very shocking. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Thank you for the revised Alectryon passage, which seems to be quite O.K., & for your note with the two additional corrections[Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I was very glad to get your note yesterday evening & to learn that David Garnett will write the article. I am sure you can safely trust [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Thanks very much for the slips of pp.69-75 of The Childermass. I am glad to find that the slips of the Alectryon passage have arrived [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Many thanks for the bke. of the slips. I enclose some queries. You will no doubt have spotted them already. We think that it would be as well to delete [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Sir, We have pleasure in sendingyou herewith proofs of pp.273-322/end of "The Childermass". With reference to the correction you wish to make [Signed Chatto & Windus]


London; Dear. Lewis, [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I had rather a harried week last week & haven't been able to read any more proofs till today. I wasn't at the office yesterday. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, The Insel-Verlag of Leipzig are ready to publish a German translation of Time and Western Man, paying you a royalty of 8% on the publishing price [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Thank you for your letters of the 9th & of today, & for the shortest of additional corrections. I quite see you position regarding the question of output [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Thanks very much for your letter of yesterday with the two corrections; and thank you again for your unfailing patience in dealing with my suggestions [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Thank you for your letter. I see your point of view, but I must put forward certain facts. Please be patient with this long letter, [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I enclose the promise of Assignment for "Tarr". I hope you will find it all right. If you do, perhaps you will sign it before a witness [With the mentioned Assignment. Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I enclose the Agreement for "Tarr". I hope you will find that it accurately represents the result of our discussion yesterday afternoon. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, We shall publish The Childermass on the 21st. I take it that this is all right. What about your American arrangements? [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Miss Wright rang me up on Saturday & gave me your address. I hope you had a decent crossing & that you are having an immediate success [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I enclose the revised memorandum concerning the payments of the advance on Sections II and III of "The Childermass". [With a copy of the memorandum mentioned. Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Sir, We have pleasure in enclosing proofs of pp.129-192 of "Tarr", and shall be obliged if you will return to us the marked set [Signed Chatto & Windus]


London; Dear Lewis, Once more many thanks for allowing me in our Miscellany to quote from The Childermass. I think the passage comes out extraordinarily well. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I am glad to hear you are back again, & I hope the voyage was a successful one. I shall be glad to see you soon too. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I am sorry I was unable to write to you yesterday. We have now, however, had time to discuss your suggestion that we should pay you [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Thank you for your letter; I do hope that the arrangement proposed will be of sufficient use. I enclose the sort of document we suggest, [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Here is the copy of "In the Beginning". I absolutely agree about "The Apes". [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, We have had a letter from Literarishes Bureau und Zeitungskorrespondenz, Baumannstrasse 5, Wien 3, enquiring after the German translation rights [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, The alterations are magnificient, but there are a couple of passages we are nervous about. Could you possible call here tomorrow morning [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, The printers have set up and pulled in galley not only the portion of "Tarr" you wanted treated in this way, but also another portion as well. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Thank you for your letter. Do keep the English edition of Tarr, if it is any use. But we shall be very glad to have it back at the earliest opportunity, [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Can yo possibly let me have the Foreword to Tarr by Monday? I hope some more proofs will be ready by then too. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Thanks very much for the Preface. I do not see any objection at all to the content of the opening sentences. The only criticisms I would venture [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Thank you for the further batch of proofs; I shall look forward to the rest tomorrow. I see you have changed "Clumsy things & some women are so proud of them" [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Many thanks for your consideration in sending the balance of the proofs here. I was very glad indeed to get them, as I am going away tomorrow at noon [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Thank you for your letter of yesterday. I note that you do not want to see any further proofs. If you can send me back the Preface passed for press.[Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Thank you for the queries on pp.65-192 of Tarr. They have been sent off to the printers, and I have asked them to get their German expert on to the case endings. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Will you please deal with the enclosed enquiry from the Literarisches Bureau? [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Many thanks for the Tarr material; I have sent off the preface & asked for an immediate proof, as I suppose you would prefer to see one; [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis,I enclose my cheque for [pounds] 20 for the picture. I hope that is all right. I am very glad to have it. Coming home I passed a man in pyjamas [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Here is a proof of the Tarr band. Will you please pass & return it as soon as you can? Proofs of the little 4-page list consisting of reviews of your books[Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Thank you for the remainder of the MS. of the Disbolical Principle. I have enjoyed reading it very much, and we would like to publish it [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, We have talked over your suggestion that we should make you a single proposal for the publication of Paleface and The Diabolical Principle. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I would have acknowledged Part I of "Paleface", had I not thought you might have been in at St. Martin's Lane. Thank you very much for it. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I am sorry that no proofs of Paleface have yet arrived. We are applying the goad to the printers (who may still be suffering from the Scottish celebration [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I shall certainly speak to our advt. manager in the sense you suggest. I had already told him to pay particular attention to "Tarr", [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I am very sorry you have been down with flu: I hope you will soon be quite all right. Thank you for your two letters. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, We are having trouble with the dustcover of Paleface. For the negress's head we naturally applied first to all to the artist who drew the Summit young man, [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, The artist has drawn his negress. Will you come and have a look at it? [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Your package arrived safely, but I had to leave the office almost as soon as I got it, since I had an appointment with the oculist, [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Thank you for the index to "Paleface". What about the drawing of the negress? [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I ought to tell you that I saw your American publisher, Friede, yesterday. He is staying at the Curzon Hotel until the 20th. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Very many thanks indeed for the drawings for the top cover and the spine of the Paleface dustcover. They are excellent. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I am sending you under separate registered cover the originals of your drawings for the front cover and spine of the Paleface jacket; [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, The dustcover of Paleface has beenpassed, and we have been able to fix the publishing date. I am sorry it will not be before May 9th. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Many thanks for your letter; two unjacketed copies of Paleface are being posted to you under separate cover; the jackets will follow [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, The subscription sales of Paleface, which was published yesterday, came to 725 copies, which I think is a fairly useful beginning; [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I am awfully sorry at having muddled "The Diabolical Principle". I did not realise that when the third number of "The Enemy" appeared the 'copy' was complete, [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Sir, Thank you for your letter of 17th May enclosing the glorious cutting from "The Times" which I san and pounced upon. I am quoting it in the T.L.S. [Signed Oliver Warner]


London; Dear Sir, We are enclosing for your kind attention an enquiry from Miss Mary E. Dallas, of Sponholzstrasse 50, Berlin- Friedenau, Germany, [Signed Chatto & Windus]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I am making what remains of the "Paleface" allocation go as far as possible. In addition to the T.L.S. 'solus' next Thursday, [Signed Oliver Warner]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, We are enclosing for your kind attention a letter from the Universitas Deutsche Verlags- Aktiengesellschaft, Berlin, [Signed Chatto & Windus]


London; Dear Sir, We beg to acknowledge receipt of your letter of the 6th inst., and have duly despatched the copy of "Paleface" to the address you gave. [Signed Chatto & Windus]


Morar, Scotland; Dear Lewis, I was delighted to receive the bundle of entries concerning "Paleface" yesterday. Certainly the press has been good. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, We have received a postcar from Messrs. R. Piper & Co. Verlag, Romerstrasse 1, Munchen 13, whom we believe to be a very sound firm, [Signed Harold Raymond]


London; Dear Sir, Mr. Raymond is on Jury service, and he has asked me to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of yesterday, and to say that we have today forwarded a copy of "Paleface" [Signed A. Willmote]


London; Dear Lewis, I am back here again. A letter has just arrived from the Viking Press declining Paleface. Would you like me to try someone else, [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Good. Will you meet me at the Kensington Palace Hotel at 8.0, which is, I think, the time that suits you, on Monday evening next, the 24th? [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, In accordance with your request I have pleasure in enclosing the firm's cheque for [pounds] 20, which will be set off against your general account. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, We have had a long discussion on The Apes of God. Our Town traveller says that on his own initiative he sounded Zwemmer the other day; [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Thank you for your letter and for writing so very kindly. I am most deeply sorry that Chatto & Windus are not to publish the Limited Edition [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Many thanks for your kind letter of last week. Whether we publish your books or not, I shall never change my mind towards them & towards yourself. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Many thanks for the Apes prospectus. Will you please put me down for 3 copies. I very much like the Ape & the Easel; [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Thank you for your kind letter. I would very much value the present from you of a copy of the Apes. It's awfully good of you to think of such a thing. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I am very glad you will be able to dine with me next week. What about Thursday or Friday (the 26th or 27th)? I hope one of the dates will suit you. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Thursday will suit me splendidly. I shall be in, or outside, the bar of the Kensington Palace Hotel at 8.0. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, From what I can see these printers look as if they were sticking it on. Our production manager confirms my guess that the binding should be [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Aldington tells me that he has received from you a telegram: "Death of a Hero magnificent I congratulate you war scenes superb". [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Since I wrote to you this morning, Mr. Derek Patmore has been in. Will you look at the enclosed clipping from the "New York World"? [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Thank you very much for your note. I am delighted you have written the article, and I do hope the "Express" takes it. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I enclose my cheque for [pounds] 50 for the three drawings: I am very happy indeed at being their fortunate possessor. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I enclose Hueffer's Foreword to the 1930 Imagist Anthology. I see that he does mention Pound in connection with the founding of Vorticism. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Thank you for the return of Ford Madox Ford's article on Imagism. Aldington tells me he has written to you promising to put right the question about your name. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, "Bottom Dogs" I fear is out of print; I applied to Putnam's in vain. I shall see whether a copy cannot be secured through the trade. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I managed to get hold of a copy of "Bottom Dogs" y'day & flicked through it last night. Here it is. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Many thanks for your letter of yesterday returning the Index. I am sorry that the elusive drawing has caused you so much trouble. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, If you are not too busy, could you dine with me one night next week: Would eith Thursday or Friday (16th or 17th) suit? [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, We have received an order from A. H. Spencer Ltd of 86, Bourke Street Melbourne, Australia, for 3 copies of Apes of God; [Signed Chatto & Windus]


London; Dear Lewis, I am very sorry I was out each time you called on Thursday. I hope though that matters righted themselves, not having heard from you since [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I am sorry I was out both at the office & her when you called, but I have got the proofs safely. No one shall see them or hear of them, [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Thank you for your letter. I am glad that Thursday next week will suit you (the 24th). I shall be at the Palace therefore that evening at 8.0. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Very many thanks for your kind letter. I shall be delighted to dine with you after Easter, & as you leave the date to me, may I say Thursday the 24th? [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Liveright's address is:- Georgian House Berry St. St. James, S.W. telephone: Regent 4014. He will be in London until the end of this week. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


Ari, Italy; I expect to be back in London on the 19th. Can you dine with me on Tuesday evening the 20th (8.0: Kensington Palace Hotel)? I hope you will be able to, [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I am delighted to prossess a copy of 'The Apes of God', as it is most kind of you to send me one. I am longing to steep myself in it [Signed Harold Raymond]


London; Dear Lewis, I returned from Scotland today & found the two parcels for me here together with your letter. I cann thank you enough for your kindness. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Very many thanks for your p.c. I guessed that the Arthur Press invoice was a mistake, as you had so kindly promised me a copy of 'The Apes'. [Signed Harold Raymond]


London; Dear Lewis, Thank you very much for your letter. I am glad you are in London again, though I hope this doesn't mean that your much-deserved holiday is abandoned. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I return the [undies?] Many thanks for letting me see them. Naomi Mitchison's was [?] to be: a very Oxfordish production. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, "The Roaring Queen" is one of the best things of its kind I have ever read. Beddnutt in the train & in his regal bedroom & the Hon. Baby Bucktrout [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Very many thanbks for "Satire & Fiction". May it effect all that you wish it to do. It's a classic pamphlet, in its arrangement, its contents [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Many thanks for your letter. I have to go out of town this afternoon, but I will be back about mid-day tomorrow. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Thank you for your letter. The reason why I suggested a meeting was because I wanted to ask you how many copies remain to be sold [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Thank you for your letter. It is dated the 28th, but I take it to be in answer to mine of yesterday morning. You did not reply to my question [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; My dear Lewis, Many thanks for your two letters. I very much appreciate the kindliness of your remarks in the longer one, and I shall write to you separately about it. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; My dear Lewis, I am sorry that various bustling occurrences prevented me from writing my second letter to you yesterday. But I just wanted to say that our first proposal [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Many thanks for your last letter of last week, which I received only this morning, for I was not here on Saturday. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I am back again & would be very glad if you could dine with me some evening next week. Would eith Monday or Tuesday suit you [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I think you must be away, for we can get no reply on your telephone. I wrote to you at the beginning of the week asking if you could dine with me [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Many thanks for your letters; I hope you enjoyed Germany. I'm very sorry, I have an engagement on Thursday night. But could you dine with me [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, "European Books" rang up late this evening to say they had had an e=inquiry from Germany regarding your HITLER. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I enjoyed the Hitler book very much, and have described its contents to the firm. The length, about 40,000 words, imposes, we are afraid, a publishing price of 6/ [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Here is the agreement in case you would like to look it over before signing. If it is all right, and yo can call here with the manuscript tomorrow [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Many thanks for your replies to the printer's queries regarding "The Diabolical Principle"; the Duke of Northumberland is O.K. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Very many thanks for the arrangement of the dustcover for "The Diabolical Principle". It will, I am sure, turn out most excellently. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Many thanks for your letter this morning. We shall talk over the matter you mention when I see you on Friday evening [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Many thanks for pp.1-96 of "Hitler", corrected for press. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, We have come to an arrangement with a "subscription" firm to handle the Phoenix Library, and may at some future date do the same regarding The Centaur [Signed Chatto & Windus]


London; Dear Lewis, Very many thanks for the admirable design for the spine of the Hitler dustcvoer; everyone here is delighted with it. We are held up on the dustcover [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, It was very kind of you to remember about the drawing of the Diabolical Principle. Every so many thanks for so acceptable a present. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, We are publishing "The Diabolical Principle" on March 5th. I take it that this is O.K. I enclose an uncorrected proof of the dustcover. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I am sending you herewith 4 pulls of the Hitler dustcover, together with your original designs. Will you please let me have your views. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I am very sorry to tell you that Morrow has just rung up and declined "Hitler". He did not say more than that he had read the proofs himself [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Thank you for your letter. We shall follow "the pencil on the white paper" pull; no colour. There has been no delay here at any point [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, We shall publish "Hitler" on the 26th. The book is now made; at least early copies are in the house. They will be wanted for the travellers, [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, The firm would very much like to publish your book on Youth. It is understood that it will run to 90,000 words, and will be published at 10/6d. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Here is the proposed agreement for the book on Youth, which I hope correctly follows the lines of our conversation of yesterday evening. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis,I forgot to enclose in my letter of yesterday evening the firm's cheque for five guineas in respect of the dustcover design for Hitler, [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, How about the additions and final alterations to your "Youth" book? I was expecting you to call in here and settle them last week, [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I ws delighted to get your letter. I cabled you this morning:- "THANKS LETTER. PLEASE WIRE TITLE. URGENT. PROPOSE SETTING PAGE FORM AND GETTING PRINTERS TO CORRECT...".[Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Thanks very much for your letter of the 25th. I am delighted that you are finding the country so pleasant and propitious. It is excellent [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, When may we expect the proofs? Time is running out; I hope you will be able to polish them off immediately. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I am very sorry not to have heard from you. Where are you? It is, of course, too late now to publish "Doom of Youth" this Autumn, [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I am very sorry not to have heard from you for so long. I hope all is well. Meanwhile, may I beseech you to let me have the corrected proofs [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I understand from more than one source that you are in London. Can you possibly make an effort and let me have the corrected proofs [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, We have received the enclosed letter from Mr. Barman, of Stockholm, expressing an itenerst in the Scandinavian right in "The Doom of Youth". [Signed Chatto & Windus]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, We thank you for returning the corrected proffs of "The Doom of Youth". We are sorry that you are dissatisfied with the printers' corrections, [Signed Chatto & Windus]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Before he left for his holidays Mr. Prentice suggested to us that if in his absence you returned the proofs of "Doom of Youth" we should examine [Signed Chatto & Windus]


London; Dear Lewis, I have just got back and am very glad to find a letter from you. I hope you had a good time in America, and I presume your visit was a successful one [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Many thanks for your letter. I enclose herewith your set of corrected proofs for the completion of the material on the pages I mentioned [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Sir, We should be obliged if you would send to us by return the queried proofs which we forwarded to you in two batches on the 9th [Signed Chatto & Windus]


London; Dear Sir, Since writing to you on the 18th inst. asking if you would return the queried proofs, our printers have again written to remind us [Signed Chatto & Windus]


London; Dear Lewis, We propose to publishe "Doom of Youth" on the 30th of this month, and unless we hear from you to the contrary in a couple of days, [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, We are amazed to hear this morning that Grayson & Grayson are publishing immediately a book by you on Morocco, and to see the announcement [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, The relevant document is a rider to "The Childermass agreement; I enclose a copy of this rider, which is in the form of a receipt for the [pounds] 100 advanced [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I still cannot understand why you avoided writing to me for so long, and I am sorry that I cannot agree with your accound of the delays [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, Thank you for your letter. The settlement we would prefer would be the complete transfer of the "Childermass" agreement and rider. [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I enclose a copy of a letter we received last night. We acknowledged it this morning, saying that we were consulting you, [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, We have this afternoon received a letter from Alec Waygh's solicitors demanding the instant withdrawal of "Doom of Youth", [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, I have been away over the weekend & our office has been [?] Your letter of the 31st is news to me. The matter has been left in the hands of your solicitors, [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Lewis, We have had no reply to the letter I wrote to you on July 4the about "The Childermass". In it I said we would not approach you other publishers [Signed C. H. Prentice]


London; Dear Sir, In answer to your letter of September 9th, we think you have been misinformed regarding your book "The Art of Being Ruled". [Signed Catto & Windus]


London; Dear Sir, We thank you for your letter of June 3rd. We regret that we do not anticipate being able to reprint TARR in at all the near future [Signed Catto & Windus]


London; Dear Sir, In answer to your telephone query, THE WILD BODY is at present out of print with us and as we have no plans for reprinting it in the near future, [Signed Catto & Windus]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I expect you will have heard from Mr. White of the conditions which I proposed for the transfer of our contract with you for THE CHILDERMASS [Signed Harold Raymond]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Thank you for your letter of 14th July, in which you kindly signed by letter of 26th June. I find on going further into your account [Signed Harold Raymond]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I am mush obliged to you for sending me the revised letter of 26th June, duly signed. I have pleasure in enclosing the dupblicate with my firm's signature. [Signed Harold Raymond]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, We are planning to publish, in collaboration with Indiana University Press, an extensive study of James Joyce, entitled DUBLIN'S JOYCE [Signed Piers Raymond]


London; Dear Sir, We were recently approaced by the Brisith Council for permission to quote a few paragraphs from "The Childermass" and "The Wild Body" [Signed Chatto & Windus]


London; Dear Sir, We enclose herwith a request for permission to quote 6 lines from THE ART OF BEING RULED. We have advised Miss Saint the we are forwarding her letter on to you [With the mentioned letter. Signed Arthur Horsfall]


London; ... I have just taken my temperature & find it is 102 so I think I had better keep myself to myself for all our sakes! I'm sending you a slight pullet as I feel you need a nourishing supper


London; My dear W.L. I am glad to have your letter & the articles. The letter to Maurois is excellent. I am "desolee" to have to tell you that I am not certain whether Tuesday will be possible


London; My dear W.L. I can't come today as I have to go to the occulist - my eyes having "done a shrink" on me! - but I am staying till Wednesday so shall see you tomorrow


London; My dear Wyndham- I more than understand & approve of your wise decision. It would take you a cool 1/2 hour to get here - oh for the days of ossers!


London; Wyndham dear - This return of the oat is very tiresome & I am distressed to think of you being ill - I will come to see you on Thursday 15th


London; Dear W.L. I'm laid low with a terrific cold & a high temperature so that I cannot leave tomorrow - Probably shall not arrive before Saturday or Sunday.


London; Dear W.L. I've had to put off leaving till Friday & I can't go out as I am not well. I spoke to Seymour Berry (son of the proprietor of the D. Telegraph)


London; Dear Wyndham, I've only just arrived in London too late to see you & tomorrow I go to Folkestone till Saturday. I could call upon you Monday morning


London; I am not sending you the Girandoux books as I find they are not your affair! Here is a segment of Sargent for your approval. How I enjoyed finding you again.


London; My dear Wyndham, I have a very bad sore throat so will keep away from you today for fear of bringing you any new bugs! I am so sorry as I enjoy coming to you


London; Dear Wyndham, I'm much better today but still rather throaty & think it best not to see you till Monday. I am going away tomorrow to the country.


Cannes; My dear Wyndham, The journey to Paris passed in a flash thanks to the Wild Body which I enjoyed quite enormously. I only wish it had been twice as long.


Capo di Monte; Dear Wyndham- I am nipping over to London to see my boys next week & am hoping very much to see you. I arrive Tuesday at 7.30


London; My dear Wyndham, Will you please lunch with us on Thursday instead of Tuesday as arranged as I find we shall not have our cook on Tuesday


Norfolk; ... & I have to thank you for a very happy evening. I come to London sometime after the 12th for a week & shall be continually knowcking at your door.


London; My dear Wyndham, Rock has made some trouble for me tomorrow afternoon & I must [hie?] me to the country but I shall be at your studio at 5.30


Norfolk; Wyndham dear, I have come here for a few days with my sick friend Katharine Furse but hope to be back in London very soon & will let you know at once.


London; Dear W.L. I have a ticket for you for Mosley's Circus tomorrow night so please ring me up between 12 & 1.00 to make arrangements.


London; My dear W.L. I am very sorry to have been so unsuccessful with your drawings. I sent them to a Mrs. Cagales who is rich & supposed to be interested in modern drawings


London; My dear Wyndham, Everything is alright for tomorrow & I will come to you at 11.15 & stay as long as you want me. You missed nothing by avoiding the lunch yesterday,


Norfolk; My dear W.L. Rock likes the drawing & is grateful to you for having let him see it. His only criticism is the shadow on the nose & the sort of twist of the nostril


Norfolk; My dear Wyndham, You will be wondering about me. My let got rather bad & I was ordered to rest it completely so I came here for a few days


Chesire; Wyndham dear- I came here by airplane direct from Folkestone that is why I did not see you. I am passing through London on Thursday 10th


London; Your telephone is the dead letter office so I write to ask if you will lunch here on Friday next at 1.30 or failing that will you call me up this evening


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. I am so sorry to hear that you have been laid low & I am anxious to hear how you are & what is the matter with you.


Norfolk; Dear Mr. Lewis. I was in a rage when I got your telegram but as it is a day for good resolutions, I forgive you. My only other resolution - & I doubt your finding it good


London; Dear Wyndham, I couldn't have enjoyed my evening more than I did. I do hope you will be back in June, it makes an enormous difference to my pleasure in London.


London; All right - your remarks have gone home & you shall be asked to no more luncheons. Noel & I will come to you tomorrow at 2.45 & you can tell me if you want me to stay


Paris; My dear Wyndham, I am overjoyed at the thought of seeing you. Your absence has lasted so long & I began to feel I should not see you anymore.


Paris; My dear Wyndham, My husband has got to stay here till the 1st or even the 2nd of June so I have had to put off going back till then. I should like very much to see you


London; My dear Wyndham, I have just heard that my boy at Eton has a whole holiday on Wednesday next ("for Henley" whatever that may be)


London; My dear Wyndham, I am free on Monday if you like & can come either morning or afternoon whichever suits you best. I hope it is the second drawing that you are going to finish,


London; Dear Wyndham, 1) I saw Noel Coward last night & he is in the throes of rehearsals & hardly ever free.- but I have arranged for him to lunch here on Wednesday


London; My dear Wyndham, I'm sorry you had the trouble of writing but was very glad you approved of my choice of Orlebas. I thought his florentine face would be good


London; Dear Wyndham, I am glad you have finished my drawing & quite agree that we must be alone when we see it so as to examine it comfortably.


Paris; My dear Wyndham, Your letter was welcome - I am sorry to have missed the opening of your show but I will see it next week. I knocked at your door


Norfolk; My dear Wyndham, I can't tell you how much I enjoured Snoot - the only complaint I had was that it was much too short & I read it at a sitting


Paris; My dear Wyndham, I'm returning to London today week the 8th & shall be there till X'mas as I have refused to return to Houghton! I'm greatly looking forward


London; Dear W.L. I've just come back & only for two days - will you try & call me up either today (Wednesday) or Thursday between 1.30 & 2.30


Norfolk; [Christmas card]


Norfolk; My dear Wyndham, I am relieved to hear that you are recovering but I shall feel happier wehn I have the certainly that the "bigwig" was a really up-to-date medicine man.


Norfolk; My dear Wyndham, I wish you wd. give me your address, then you would get the letters at once instead of delaying things by sending to Percy St.


Paris; My dear Wyndham, I wonder how you are & where? I shall expect a letter from you very soon telling me of your adventures since my departure.


[n.p.; My dear Wyndham, It is some time since I heard from you but I hope you have made a start with your massage - & I hope that you have a doctor who has two arms!


Capo di Monte; My dear Wyndham, How strang it is that none of you rmany Aesculops ever diagnosed your trouble as coming from the kidneys


Paris; Dear Wyndham, I've been in a spin ever since I got here so my very measly contribution to your holiday is rather delayed. I am rather "genie" at the moment


Nurnberg; I came here for a week of complete rest & have enjoyed it enormously. The Chancellor has been here all the time & I have seen him daily from afar!


Norfolk; My dear W.L. I have got One Way Song & think it quite first rate. It goes with a terrific rhythm & all the new cantos (which were new to me)


London; Dearest Wyndham, I am distressed at leaving London without seeing you again & I feel somehow that you are not well but there it is.


Norfolk; My dear W.L. I was glad to hear from you as I was very disheartened at not having seen or heard from you during my short visit to London.


London; Dear Wyndham, I am back in London, and would like to see you as soon as possible. Please telephone me to-morrow evening after 8 o'clock,


London; My dear W.L. I am sending you a small present so that you may be able to "pendre la cremaillete" in your new abode without undue stinting.


Paris; Wyndham dear, I am so vexed to see this Coriolanne article in the Times, it is so inadequate & I would so much rather it had been yours.


Golfe Juan; My dear W.L. Well, you have been going through some bad times since I went away & before you could say knife - c'est le cas de le dine -


Norfolk; My dear W.L. I am thankful to hear that you have at last escaped from the prison-house. You will have a tale to unfold when I see you.


Paris; My dear W.L. Your rapid blit was a great pity but probably you were right. I shall see you on Tuesday next. Let me know where unless you will" stretch a point"


London; Dear Wyndham, I was very sorry that you gave up your holiday as I felt that you needed it rather badly. As you did not send for your drawings,


Cannes; Dear Wyndham, I like the beret picture very much, with its slightly Chinese look which I don't see in you at all. I wonder what you are up to


Bathurst, N.D.; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you so much for your letter of the 2nd and I am indeed sorry to hear about your glasses.


Bathurst, N.D.; Dear Mr. Lewis, Many thanks for your letter of the 9th and please forgive my not answering your previous letters but owing to unforseen activities


Oxford, Dear Madam. An American client, who is an advisor of your late Husband's work, has requested me write is you is enquire whether you would be willing to let him


Oxford, Dear Madam. You will recall that I wrote to you regarding a client of mine who was interested in your late Husband's work. When I hear from you,


St. Louis; Dear Mr. Lewis, I was delighted have your letter and to hear that there is a possibility of your coming this way. Mr. Giovanelli was kind enough to bring in an outline [Signed Charles Nagel, Jr.]


St. Louis; Dear Mr. Lewis, It was a pleasure to have your letter of Aug. 20th and I shall take up with the Board in September the matter of definitely schedulting a lecture by you [Signed Charles Nagel, Jr.]


St. Louis; Dear Mr. Lewis, At the meeting of the Board of Control on Thursday I was authorized to ask you to give a lecture on contemporary painting [Signed Charles Nagel, Jr.]


[Numbers skipped due to misnumbering.]


St. Louis; Dear Mr. Lewis, I am delighted to know that you will be here on the 21st of February and we shall schedule the lecture definitely for that date. [Signed Charles Nagel, Jr.]


St. Louis; Dear Mr. Lewis, I think your suggestion that you speak on "The Cultural Melting-pot" aspect of modern painting is an extremely good one and one which will be sure to interest all of us [Signed Charles Nagel, Jr.]


St. Louis; Dear Mr. Lewis, I am enclosing the Museum's check for one hund and fifty dollars, the honorarium for your lecture on Monday night. [Signed Charles Nagel, Jr.]


Oxford; Dear Mrs. Lewis, You may remember that in August last year Methuen consulted you about Philip Larkin's proposed use of 'The Song of the Militant Romace' {Signed Isobel M. Findlay]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis. My wife and I are very glad you and Mrs. Lewis can be our guests of lonor at supper, Sunday, March 3, at seven o'clock.


Goshen, NY; Dear Mr. Lewis: Last March 24th I wrote to you with regarad to THE INTERNATIONAL PETITION. Not have heard from you,


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you for your letter. The War Artists Committee are most anxious to employ you; indeed you were one of the first artists


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I have now had the opportunity of reading both your letters to the War Artists Advisory Committee. They fully appreciate your position,


London; Dear Sirs, We have been instructed by Mr. Wyndham Lewis to act for him in the position which has arisen out of his agreement with you


London; Dear Sirs, With reference to your letter of the 25th February, our previous letters have dealt with the whole of the facts so far as they are withing the knowledge of Mr. Lewis [Sent to Ivor Nicholson & Watson Ltd. with copy to Poetry London.]


London; Dear Sir, We are instructed by Mr. Wyndham Lewis to write to you regarding the agreement of 21st February 1946 for the publicattion of "Chateaux Rex"


London; Dear Sirs, We are in receipt of your letter of the 19th instant from the second paragraph of which it appears that you have not assimilated paragraph 4 of our letter


London; Dear Sirs, We refer to the letter addressed to the letter addressed to us by Editions Poetry London Ltd. on the 17th December. We have further conferred with our client


London; Dear Sirs, With reference to Mr. Wyndham-Lewis' book "America and Cosmic Man", there are two metters upon which our Client desires to be enlightened.


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. I enclose for your consideration a draft of the letter I propose writing to Mressrs. Poetry London. I should be grateful if you would let me know [Signed W.M. Mitchell.]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. Thank you for your letter of the 14th instant enclosing the relevant correspondence between yourself and Poetry London. [Signed W.M. Mitchell.]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. I enclose copy of a letter we have sent to Mr. Roberts today. Letters in similar terms have also been sent to Messrs. Nicholson & Watson [Signed W.M. Mitchell.]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. As arranged on the telephone this morning I enclose (1) Copy letter from Poetry London; (2) Copy letter from Nicholson & Watson [Signed W.M. Mitchell.]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. I enclose draft letters I propose sending to Mr. Roberts and Poetry London respectively. I should be glad if your would let me know [With the draft letter to Poetry Editions London; Signed W.M. Mitchell.]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. I enclose copies of two letters from Nicholson & Watson Ltd. dated 13th instant, together with a draft of the replty I propose [Signed W.M. Mitchell.]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. I enclose draft of the letter I propose sending to Editions Poetry London and should be grateful ifyou would let me know [Signed W.M. Mitchell.]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. I enclose copy of a letter I have received from Poetry London today. I do not think any reply is required. I will let you know [Enclosed is a copy of the said letter. Signed W.M. Mitchell.]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. I enclose copy of a letter I have received from Editions Poetry London today from which you will see that although there is a welcome change [Signed W.M. Mitchell.]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis. I enclose copy of a letter received today from Poetry London, from which you will see that they are willing to agree to a mutual release[Signed W.M. Mitchell.]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. Referring to our telephone conversation this afternoon, I have referred to the correspondence. I think the position is as follows: [Signed W.M. Mitchell.]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. I have referred to the papers and agree with you that the time has come when you should give notice to determine this contract. [Signed W.M. Mitchell.]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. This is to acknowledge receipt of the two notices you signed. I have served them by registered post today and will keep your informed [Signed W.M. Mitchell.]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. I enclose copy of a letter received from Editions Poetry London as a result of my serving the notice. The letter is self explanatory [Signed W.M. Mitchell.]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. Herewith copy of my letter to Messrs. Nicholson & Watson Ltd. as arranged on the telephone this afternoon. [Signed W.M. Mitchell.]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. I have received the draft Agreement which is to supersede the original Agreement in respect of this book. The terms are in accordance with the proposals [Signed W.M. Mitchell.]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. I enclose the Agreement for signature by you over the 6d. stamp and return to me, when I will use every endeavour to exchange it [Signed W.M. Mitchell.]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. As I told you on the telepone I have had sufficient assurances from Messrs. Bulcraig & Davis that the Agreement will be carried through [Signed W.M. Mitchell.]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. I have heard from Messrs. Bulcraig & Davis today enclosing cheque for [pounds] 60 in your favour. I enclose this herewith [Signed W.M. Mitchell.]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. I have received the two parts of the Agreement signed by Ivor Nicholson & Watson Ltd. and Editions Poetry London Ltd. [Signed W.M. Mitchell.]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. This is to acknowledge receipt of the further copy of the Agreement and receipt for the sum of [pounds] 60., the amount of the advance, [Signed W.M. Mitchell.]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. I have received two copies of "America & Cosmic Man" which I have forwarded to Mr. Richmond Temple. I have asked him to get in touch with you [Signed W.M. Mitchell.]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis. I am enclosing herewith your original documents and papers in connection with the dispute with Messrs. Ivor, Nicolson & Watson Ltd.[ With list of deeds and documents returned and copy of same. Signed W.M. Mitchell.]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. Many thanks for your letter of the 20th instant acknowledging receipt of the papers I returned to you. I have written to Nicholson & Watson [Signed W.M. Mitchell.]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis. I enclose a copy of a letter received today from Ivor Nicholson & Watson Ltd. The first paragraph is thoroughly unsatisfactory, [Signed W.M. Mitchell.]


London; Dear Sir, May we remind you that we have not received your cheque for [pounds] 32.5.0d in settlement of our account in the above matter [Signed Clifford Turner.]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, As arranged on the telephone this morning I am returning to you the papers in my hands concerning your latest trouble with Editions Poetry London Ltd.[Signed W.M. Mitchell.]


Berkhamstead, Herts.; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, We once lived on the middle floor of 4 Phene St. It was always a joy to me that here perhaps Blast and Vortex defied the Chelsea neighborhood


Toronto; Pklease reply regarding contract for Mrs. Dukes Millions.


London; My dear Wyndham Lewis. Its strange that as I left you I met Grayson and to-day he sent me Filibusters and The Apes of God. I'm ashamed that I haven't read the Apes.


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I am still working on my catalogue of books illustrated by British painters and sculptors, I think I mentioned it to you


Columbus, OH; Dear Mr. Lewis: In "Blasting and Bombardiering" you give some attention to the personalities and ideas prominent in the literary life of London


View Royal, B.C.; Dear Sir. I always enjoy your articles in the Tatler, so I turned eagerly to your article 'Bread & Ballyhoo' in The Listener, Sept. 8th.


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis. I was deeply grieved to hear the sad news of your husband and all of us at the Slade would like to send you our most sincere sympathy.


London; Dear Sir. We are appealing to you to sign the enclosed statement. Where politicians have so manifestly failed, it is the plain duty of others, who in normal times, [Signed G.D.H. Cole, J.L. Hammond and Ford Madox Hueffer]


Crux Easton, Berks.; My dear Lewis, Many thanks for your invitation. Alas, though, I can't come on Wednesday, as I'm off to Briebs tomorrow


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, We venture to ask your support in the founding of a new literary magazine, COLONNADE. We shall not enlarge on the need [Signed S. S. Canre-Ross]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis: Have just heard you are in New York, and I wondered if you would be interested ing iving a talk to our young painters [Signed Frank Mechau]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis: Your lecture here the other night stirred up a great deal of interst among the students. The controversy is still rolling on between cigaretts. [Signed Frank Mechau]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis: Have just heard you are in New York, and I wondered if you would be interested ing iving a talk to our young painters [Signed Frank Mechau]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis: Sorry you couldn't make it today. I'll be out of twon Thursday, and this week end, but practically any other day will be all right. [Signed Frank Mechau]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I have tried yesterday and today to reach you by telephone, but there has not been a reply. Perhaps you are out of town, [Signed Ann Rogers]


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, We have received a letter from a Mr. Walter Michel of New Jersey, U.S.A. a copy of which is attached. [Copy enclosed. Signed Patrick Matthews]


London; Dear Lewis, I have been through the proposed book of stories and as commerce, I do like the look of it. As I believe that you want to try and arrange for their publication [Signed Michael Sadler]


London; Dear Lewis, We have discussed the question of revising the letter agreement of June 7 last between you and this firm. The proposed changes in the arragement [Signed Michael Sadler]


London; Dear Lewis, My wanderings now being over, I write as arranged to ask when we could meet either to go through the story or to discuss matters generally. [Signed Michael Sadler]


London; Dear Lewis, I am glad tohave your letter of the 22nd. I am not at all tired of the idea of fiction from you, although I am bound to say I had begun to give up hope of getting any. [Signed Michael Sadler]


London; Sir, More than eighteen months ago some correspondence passed between you and a member of this firm relative to your book THE LIFE OF A TYRO, [Signed Constable & Co.]


London; Dear Sir, We understood when you came to see us that you were going to be good enough to write to us. We shall be very glad to have a letter [Signed Constable? & Co.]


London; Dear Sir, We are in receipt of your letter of the 23rd January. After careful consideration, we think the simplest course will be if you will sign a fresh agreement [Signed Constable & Co. ]


London; Dear Sir, We received your letter of the 5th February, stating that you had influenza, and that you would attend to our communication as soon as you had recovered. [Signed Constable & Co.]


London; Dear Sir, We have your letter of the 3rd April, and are very much disappointed with its contents. We thought it was settled that you should either sign the new agreement [Signed Constable & Co.]


London; Dear Sir, We have had no reply to our letter to you of the the 10th April. If you mean to reply to it, will you kindly let us have a letter [Signed Constable & Co.]


London; Dear Sir, We received your letter on the 4th May in which you said you would "try to put your hand on the hundred pounds" and would [Signed Constable & Co.]


Cambridge, Mass.; Dear Mr. Lewis: I am writing to you to inquire into the possibility of your collaborating with "Confluence", a quarterly designed to give European, [Signed Henry A. Kissinger]


London, Canada; Dear Sirs: I am editing with an Introuction a book of critical reviews and articles on Morley Callaghan for publication this autumn in McGraw-Hill Ryerson's Critical Views


London, Canada; Dear Mrs. Lewis: In March I recweived a note from Associated Book Publishers Limited of London indicating that they had forwarded to you my request [With ALS reply to Conron from Mrs. Lewis on verso.]


London, Canada; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Thank you for your kind letter giving permission to reprint without fee Wyndham Lewis' "What Books for Total War."


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Philip Toynbee took your article away with him on Friday to read over the week-end. As he will not come in to the office [Signed A. G. Weidenfeld]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I am not writing to hurry you up, for I know that your date-line is still some time ahead, but I have been wondering [Signed Philip Toynbee]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, On behalf of the editors I beg to enclose cheque value Twenty-six pounds and five shillings ([pounds] 26:5:0) in payment [Signed E. Johnston]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I write to ask you whether you would be good enough to send along some biographical notes about yourself - roughly 250 words - [Signed Nora Lloyd]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Mr. Weidenfeld has passed to me your letter of August 10th. I am very sorry indeed that the advertisement of BRITAIN BETWEEN WEST AND EAST [Signed Nora Lloyd]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, It was good to you to agree to write a critique on the Royal Academy for the first number of "Contact" magazine. [Signed Jack Winocour]


Toronto; Dear Mr. Lewis Unfortunately, the enclosed letter was opened by us in error.Please accept our apologies. [Signed E. Vorres]


Oxford; Dear Agnes, I received the enclosed this morning and thought you might possibly be able to help them. Perhaps Mrs. Lewis could give them a negative [With TLS request from Peace News.]


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, I write to you, as I am starting to plan a special illustrqted Wyndham Lewis number of AGENDA to contain articles


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Please forgive my delay in writing to thank you for your v. helpful letter of the 3rd January - my correspondence has got into a chastic state


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Many thanks for your letter. I am sorry to hear that you have been unwell & hope that the severe cold now gone.


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Many thanks for the very interesting parcel of photocopies you sent recently. Can you give me any idea of the date of JOINT?


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you for notification of your change of address. I am greatful to you for saying that I can use the No-Nothing Mode.


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, I was very sorry to hear of the accident to your foot & hope it is less painful now. I would not bother you with another letter


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Many thanks for your letter. I will ask Walter Michel for that address. I enjoyed meeting him and his wife last week.


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Many thanks for your letter and the fine photographs. I hope to use several of them. I particularly like the one with a boat


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you for your letter. I am surprised Kenner described Sitwell portrait as "satire" - I wonder if it was an ill-though-out remark


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, I send you an advance copy. The printed brought round yesterday. I am sending most of these for various.


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Re: Flat 2, 59 Great Cumberland Place. I enclose herewith a note of our charges in this matter, which I trust you will find in order. [With invoice enclosed. Signed K. Wood]


[Missed in numbering]


St. Louis; Dear Mr. & Mrs. Lewis, Many thanks for your letter of January 9th, and I do hope you finally received your baggage safe & sound.


Washington, D.C.; Gentlemen: I have your telegram of yesterday with regard to the possibility of Mr. Wyndham Lewis lecturing here. [Signed C. Powell-Minnigerbode]


Kirkwood, Mo.; Dear Mr. Lewis: It was very nice to hear from you; I hope the cool weather at Windsor continues at 53 [degrees} F. It has been the coolest July


Estes Park, Co.; Dear Mr. Lewis: Thank you for your letter which was somewhat cryptic. However even phony ethis are better than none.


Kirkwood, Mo.; Dear Mr. Lewis: Thank you for your note of Dec.26. I hope you have found a suitable apartment and there are not too many blizzards.


Kirkwood, Mo.; Dear Mr. Lewis: Your letter of Feb. 1 is before me. More of Europe has gone up in flames and down in rubble since then and


Kirkwood, Mo.; Dear Mr. Lewis: I suppose you are thinking of booking passage East. It is wonderful to know that the fighting is over, though the elation is considerably weakened


Kirkwood, Mo.; Dear Mr. Lewis: I am reading "Rotting Hill" with very great interest and am pleased taht it has been extensively reviewed in this country;


Kirkwood, Mo.; Dear Mr. Lewis: How very nice of you to invite us to dinner at the Savoy Hotel on June 28. We are greatly looking forward to the occasion.


Le Zoute,Belgium.; Dear Mr. & Mrs. Lewis: It was a most enjoyable party and it was a great pleasure to see you again, in your own environment.


St. Louis, Mo.; Dear Mr. Lewis: We hope to be in London again for a few days. It will be in June. Could we call on you any time around the 25th -


Bath; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I am at present engaged on a thesis on Vorticism for my Fine Arts Tripos at Cambridge University. Illustrations naturally play a vital part


Cambridge; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you so much for your very kind letter of May 2nd. I must apologise for not replying more promptly,


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I have been researching for some years now into the Vorticist period, and indeed wrote to you about it when I first started


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Thank you so much for being kind enough to write down your memories of your husband's account of his Paris days.


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, How good of you to reply to my queries with such helpfulness. I find it fascinating to hear that Lewis was involved with the Appolinaire group


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, My thanks once again for replying to my queries: it really is most kind of you. How fascinating that Lewis lived in the same street


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, My thanks once more for replying to my letter. You have been more than kind in answering all my queries, and I really think you deserve a rest from me now!


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, The book on Vorticism which I have corresponded with you about before is finished, and will be published next March


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Thank you so much for your helpful reply to my letter. I am indeed quoting fairly extensively, not only from the two issues of BLAST,


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, You may be aware that I am organising a full-scale Vorticism exhibition at the Hayward Gallery, scheduled to open on March 26th


Ithaca, NY; Dear Mr. Fox: Thank you for your letter of 15 February about the existence of unpublished short stories [Signed Mary F. Daniels]


Ithaca, NY; My dear Mrs. Lewis: Among the faculty of English literature of this university there are many persons [Signed George H. Healey]


Ithaca, NY; Dear Mrs. Lewis: I am writing to inform you of a publishing project that the Cornell University Library is undertaking. [Signed Mary F. Daniels]


Ithaca, NY; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Thank you so much for your letter of 1 May. I am very happy that you are pleased with our publishing project, [Signed Mary F. Daniels]


Ithaca, NY; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Enclosed you will find, fresh from the press, a copy of the library's catalogue of the Wyndham Lewis Collection [Signed Mary F. Daniels]


Ithaca, NY; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Thank you for your very kind letter of the 4th September. I'm sincerely happy that the catalogue pleased you.[Signed Mary F. Daniels]


Ithaca, NY; Dear Mrs. Lewis: I've just had a note from Linda Sandler, fresh from a very pleasant Lewisian interlude in England with you, [Signed Mary F. Daniels]


Ithaca, NY; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Thank you for your note of the 8th. Since you might not have access to it, I enclose a xerox from the 1972 edition [Signed Mary F. Daniels]


Ithaca, NY; Dear Mrs. Lewis: In a recent letter C. J. Fox mentioned that you have found among your papers several interesting letters to your husband [Signed Mary F. Daniels]


Milton Keynes, England; Dear Mrs. Lewis, In a student correspondence text for form part of our course "Modern Poetry"


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I am sending another page of proof, and tis relevant manuscript, together with the whole typescript


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis. Thank you for your letter & also for your cheque for [pounds] 7.17.6 which I hereby acknowledge.


London; Dear Mr. Lewis: Mr.Newman Flower told me this morning that he believed that your book SNOOTY BARONET [Signed Nora L.C. James?]


Glasgow; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I am writing to tell you about the formation of a Wyndham Lewis Society. The aim of the society


Glasgow; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Thank you for your letter with Peter Lloyd's address. I wrote to Peter Lloyd asking him if we could show his film


Glasgow; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I am writing to tell you about the formation of a Wyndham Lewis Society. The aim of the society


Glasgow; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Thank you very much for your kind letter. Both Tom Kinninmont and I were delighted that you enjoyed yourself


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Could you possibly come and see Ronald Jeans and me on Friday afternoon at 3.00.


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I have only just returned from America and found the copy of your new book. How terribly nice it was of you to send it to me.


New York; Dear Lewis: If you'll read this piece of yours over again in cold bood, I think you will get the impression that I did,


Windsor; London [5 creditors have sent dun notices to Lewis for payment of debts.]


London; Dear Sir, As you did not fetch your books today at 3. o'clock as arranged, the books have now been removed to the basement. Will you apply for them to the housekeeper


London; Dear Sir, Mr. Ekiot has asked me to remind you that your reviews for the January number of "The Criterion" are required by tomorrow (Saturday). [Signed I.P. Fassett]


London; Dear Sir, I am informed by the housekeeper of these buildings, Mr. W. Read, that you have not yet called for, or sent for, the parcels which he is holding. [Signed I. P. Fassett]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Mr. Eliot has asked me to reply to your letter as he is on the point of leaving for Cambridge. He asks me to explain that he has not yet had time to read [Signed I.P. Fassett]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I sent your manuscriopt to you by your messenger this morning. I had hoped taht I might see you to explain the circumstances [Signed I.P. Fassett]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I have been hoping to receive the corrected galley of your essay during today. I am afraid that I shall be obliged to return final galley [Signed I.P. Fassett]


London; Dear Sir, Mr. Eliot has asked me to inform you that owing to certain concurrences of opinion THE CRITERION is to be continued. [Signed I.P. Fassett]


[n.p.] With every good wish for Chrismas and the New Year - during which we hope we shall see you again. [Christmas card]


[n.p.] Our fourth daughter born three weeks ago! Do hope all goes well with you - and that we will meet again soon. [Christmas card]


[Oxford] ... with nearly all writers at that period) he felt personally involved in politics in their day to day manifestations. Having said all this, I must hastily add .


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Delighted that we shall be meeting again soon. The day that suits me best next week is Thursday and I would suggest that you


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Do please forgive me for any apparent rudeness. Since our last phone conversation I have embarked on a flat-moving operation,


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Delighted that we shall be meeting again soon. The day that suits me best next week is Thursday and I would suggest that you


The Hague; Unlike you I have managed to get well away for Easter. This ks a fine old city and well worth a visit. I do hope you are feeling better now.


Tellaro; Tomlin gave me your new address. I do hope you will enjoy living in Devon - and that you will still come up to London some times.


Toronto; Well, [?] I am and this evening in the company of Hugh Anson-Cartwright I have made my pilgrimage to the Tudor Hotel?


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, I have been meaning to write to you ever since I spent two days in Toronto at the beginning of March.


Milan; I'm so sorry not to have been in touch for so long. Cy Fox told me recently that you had not been well. I do hope you are better and that we meet again soon.


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Did you know that a small Lewis exhibition is currently being held at the Mayor Gallery? It is a rather slight affair


[n.p.] Very nice to catch a glimpse of you at the Symposium but wish there had been more chance to talk! Wasn't it tragic about Michael Ayrton? [Chritsmas card]


Brewst; As Carl Tomlin is writing card to you I take this liberty of doing so also ... and to include a hope that this great picture is nearly finished.


Malta; Dear Froanna, I've been meaning to write and say how mich I appreciated your lending me "American, I presume" - and also how much I've enjoyed it.


[n.p.] Dear Froanna, Could you make it 7.30 tomorrow evening, instead of 7? I had hoped to have another couple to meet you - tshe being an old friend of mine,


London; Dear Froanna, I'm back in London, awaiting transfer to Paris - to a new international body, the O.E.C.D., as its Director of External Relations


London; Forgive me angel please - I did go to Hyde Park H. but was so late - 25 to 6 - looked for you in lounge and saw Hoope-La (or some such)


Dear Wyndham Lewis, We are delighted with this composition. See you Wednesday at 2.30.


[London] Dear Lewis, I sent you a telegram yesterday but no answer. I'm at the 'Tower' Museum 870: and suggest lunch tomorrow - or before dinner?


Venice; Dear Lewis, It is done - I have found a home here; yesterday took a little floor on the stretch of ... The Grand Canal - it is rather exquisite.


[n.p.] It is somehow impossible to write of all this - see me doing the children's Christmas tree, surrounded by relations, and noise. Father really very ill,


[London] Dear Lewis, Yes, alright, and with pleasure, tea - on Thursday? at 5 cher vous. But D shan't come unless sanctified by wire or word.


[n.p.] Darling Lewis, The more I think of you the more I feel that a lot of nonsense passes between us - that I listen to you with very great impatience,


[n.p.] What a lovely drawing of Ronald Firbank in his book - it has just come from Violette - really a lovely drawing. Do write to me, and say who you are doing


[Paris] Dear Lewis, What do you think? It is proposed to start a new gallery in London (Rosenberg, Lionel) and to give shows of english artists as well as french


London; Dear Lewis, Her L and to will come to see you tomorrow (Friday) afternoon about 4.15. It is Mrs. Kennington's drawing that she wants.


Train; Thurs.; It is some time since I felt as I do at the moment! rather angry (not unreasonably so over luggage difficulties etc) and somewhat sick.


Train to Newhaven; Thursday; Sweet Lewis. What should I be angry with you about? of course I am not. Loved your pretty note and have taken Kondino's head with me.


Foydt's; Fri, 5 p.m.; Darling. Just got your telegram bless you. I get rather alarmed when I hear nothing of you for 10 days! - but it is [?] isn't it?


Peterboro; Friday; Dear Lewis, It is Thurday next I should love you to dine with me. I hear in this house the reasons for not having the war-memorial,


Cavalaire; Friday 15; If I do not find the Moorish town of Gassin more to the taste than this ... we go in a moment, by car and on foot, returning by the train


[n.p.] Friday morning; I miss you and I hate this damp winter; not much else has passed through my mind since your left, save a pleased memory of our last dinner.


Cavalaire; Saturday; Test your cold by pinch in of this erb (as the Americans say) and admire the pretty stone - perhaps it has a remote connection with the diamonds


[Paris] Darling- Look at this honey-comb - suppose my mind to be like it, full of empty pigeon-holes for your reception - however, I am hurriedly lunching alone.


[Paris] Sat; Dear Lewis- Loved your letter yesterday with enclosure of flaccid Hutchie - Poor H. Had not received a previous, and it is very good to know you are coming here,


[Trains] Sat.;Dear Lewis, I must explain, one day, how very Spanish I felt when I did not meet you at V - it shook even me from my generally brave and firm resolution


Train to Scotland; Sat Morning; Here are the pale fields of the Midlands - and 3 comfortable co-travellers. I feel rather numb, and very parched after a great hurry


Saturday, 6.30; I enjoy my solitary afternoon, tapping out dispiriting poems - one of which (and not written today) I send you. Doris liked it -she was fine this morning,


[n.d.] Sat. 8.a.m.; Goodbye darling - I love you more than I did, and you were very divine last night - what a nice dinner. Good-bye makes me wonder


Alpes Maritimes; Dear Lewis, This is my address for 3-4 weeks. I am thinking of the painting I bought (Christmas-time) which, alas I had to leave at Mrs. Kapp's.


Positano, Italy; Dear Lewis,I can understand that you should have no time nor inclination to write me letters, but the reason of your not having sent the drawing


Cagnes sur Mer; Dear Lewis, Many thanks for your letter. Have moved from Mougins, and the above is the address till I send you my own


Venice; Venice. And Lady Colebrooke (a bit earlier in the season - should come on or out with Rain, no?) And Jerry Kerr, but as yet untraced.


Paris; Dear Lewis, I should like to see you again. Would you by any chance care for a holiday or dange here in Paris? if so I would get you a room


Paris; Dear Lewis, Do I know if you would mind receiving a man, Mr. de Hevsey, (whom I don't know) who is to do interviews with "best modern painters in London"


Paris; Darling Lewis, Before I go now to stand on my head in the effort of moving from the studio to the island (now approaching flood) I thank you


London; DOha Comarade. Quite for hasard I got your message, on Saturday night when I saw Alick & my brother. Of course, I am really furious with you!


[n.p.] Positano Notepaper actually & rediscovered, but I am dining in great wariness and pleasant enough solitude in the place where we had a scene


London; Dear Lewis, I have been dining alone and pondering how I could write to you - concluding also that it cannot be done - if I were stulik I could talk to you,


London; Such a lunch - between 2 editors made Clifford Sharp (celin du chapeau d'or) tell me of the Hspenski Institute, which has thrilled him!


Paris; Darling Lewis, You have not written to me, I miss you. Did you get my note from the train? What a journey that was -


Venice; Echos of "The Hat" even will not force me to England just yet! but I should like to see you. Put enclosed towards the acquisition of a drawing


St. Remy; Being on the wing has impeded the writing of letters, it is the postcard's triumph! Darling, the studio I saw was at the end of Avenue


Toulon; Darling. I find a letter with a nice drawing of glove here, bless you. Lovely Toulon. This quay like Venice,


On the Channel; Rough as hell - I feel so ill - nearly 300 people on the boat and I'm hidden downstairs thank God


Train to Marseille; And what a dreary journey. Shocked into horror at Lyons, where I lost my blue case with passport, keys, etc. etc.,


Vernon; Dear Lewis, Once more impossible to remember number! Je one fre an postman (for the complete circulars of film)


London; It is a great book. I have just finished it. Would you ever care to come here? It is boring to see people but have not an artist


London; I am so sorry you have been ill. I have been abroad & during my absence my house burnt down (inside only)


London; Dear Sir, We regret that no reply has been received to our former letters relating to a reading glass [Signed J. R. Howard]


Leipzig; Dear Sir, Your letter to the Insel-Verlag was submitted to me, as I was formerly a member of this house. [Signed Kurt Fiedler]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis: I am enclosing a letter which ourr German office asked us to forward. [Signed C. R. Everitt]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Our German office reports that Messrs. Insel Verlag have been so much in the midst of Christmas [Signed C. R. Everett]


Leipzig; Dear Mr. Lewis" With reference to your kind letters of December the 23rd 1930 I am so sorry to have to inform you [Signed Kurt Fiedler]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, As one of our rebels, you ought to be able to write me a most interesting article on why you are rebillious [Signed Reginald Pound]


New York; [Letter and envelope torn in half length-wise and unreadable.]


[n.p.] Dear Mrs. Lewis, Your husband & I were first cousins-once-removed, his mother being the daughter of my father's sister, Mrs. Prickett.


Oxford; Dear Wyndham Lewis. Your book has not yet been sent on to me by the publishers and as they have probably forgotten & I am looking foward to reading


Oxford; Dear Wyndham Lewis. The Enemy No.2 and Time and the Western Man have both arrived. I am very greateful to you for them and for the trouble you have taken.


Oxford; Dear Wyndham Lewis. I send you the review I promised of Tmer & Western Man. The editior mas made it into a small article, given a title of his own


Oxford; Dear Wyndham Lewis. I am so glad that you found my review on the shole far & that it did not displease you. On the one point you mention I am very sorry


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis. Many thanks. May I suggest Thursday of next week for lunch. I shall be at the Palace Hotel at 1 p.m. But don't hesitate to put it off


Oxford; Dear Wyndham Lewis. It is very kind indeed of you to send me the Wild Body. I am looking forward to read it with great enjoyment.


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis. I was so glad to hear from you. I should like to meet you again very muvh. Yes it will be quite possible to meet here at Mount Street,


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis. It was certainly good of you to send me the Enemy. I enjoyed reading it very much - delayed writing to thank you


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis. By all means drop the "Father". Thanks so much for the suggestion as to how to see you. I should like to come in this evening


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis. Many thanks for your letter. I am delighted my book is acceptable. It would give me great pleasure to sit for you.


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis. I have had an answer from Chesterton. He says he will be very glad to sit for you. He hopes you are not in a hurry


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis. Thank you for the telegram. I have only just got back & so could not answer before. Thursday will suit me just as well


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis. I find too that Tuesday from 3 to 6.30 would be very difficult for me, whereas I could manage from 5 to a little after 6


Oxford; Dear Wyndham Lewis. I have been thinking since I got your letter yesterday, whether I could find an illustration. But so far I have failed.


Oxford; Dear Wyndham Lewis. Thank you so much for your kind invitation. I should so much like to have come, but I am tied her on Thursday,


Oxford; Dear Wyndham Lewis. Many thanks for your letter & invitation when I return to London. It will be a pleasure to see you again. The Phoenix Society


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis. I am so glad to hear from you & also to learn that you have several books in [?]. I know little save by reputation


Oxford; Dear Wyndham Lewis. Tom Burns has given me the card of invitation to your exhibition which you so kindly sat. I wish I could come for his Turvali now,


New York; Dear Wyndham Lewis. I had heard that you were in the States & I am very glad to hear from you. I should very much like to see you again.


San Francisco; Dear Wyndham Lewis. Your letter reached me here this morning. I left New York a fortnight or so ago & am giving a summer course of lectures here.


London; Madam, The Sunday Times magazine is preparing a series on art and we would like to reproduce in colour the painting at the Tate:


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, I am collecting the illustrations for a book entitled A VISUAL DICTIONARY OF ART which is to be published


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I have had a letter from Mr. Ezra Pound in which he asks me to give you a message. I think it would be the best thing if I copied it


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I am very sorry to have to draw your attention to the enclosed account of Messrs. Lovat Dickson with yourself? [Signed Nicholas Davies]


Woensfield, Staffs.; Dear Sir, I must apologise for the liberty I am taking in writing to you but I am endeavouring to make a collection of the autographs of the leading artists


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I shall be delighted to meet you again, but we have to postpone the anticipated pleasure for a little while more,


Ontario; Dear Mr. Pound: I have been reluctant to gett too far into the publication of "Mrs. Duke's Millions" before receiving a signed contract from Mrs. Lewis.


Sussex; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, We have published a dictionary of 20th c. artists & propose to publish a second volume which will carry 200-300 plates.


[n.p.] Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Granada Publishing Limited would like to reproduce Portrait of Virginia Woolf C. 1923 drawn by Wyndham Lewis


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, We are working on a history of the Cafe Royal, to be published by Hutchinsons later this year, and should be very grateful


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Many thanks indeed for your letter and for allowing us to quote from your books. Thank you also for suggesting that we get in touch


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, We thought you might like to read through what we are writing about you in our forthcoming book - and I sincerely hope that you will not mind


Toronto; My dear Wyndham Lewis, I hope that you received the wire that we sent to you this morning. If I had been sure that it would have been safe [Signed H. B?]


Toronto; [5 letters from Canadian publishers to Lewis in Buffalo.]


Toronto; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you for yours of yesterday. We expect our shipment of the "Cult" any day - I think I can go so far as to promise[Signed H. B[?]]


Toronto; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Your letter, undated, reached me two or three days ago. I had to take up the matter with our trade and business offices [Signed H. B[?]]


Toronto; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Here are the Canadian reviews of "The Hitler Cult". They have only just arrived from our Sale Promotion Depatment, [Signed H. B[?]]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, After all I must ask you to let us have until Monday before my Board are able to decide [Signed Richard Church]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, It would be fine if you could get a picture from David Low for the wrapper of your book [Signed A.J. Home]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Ben Huebsch is not at this moment in England but he is expected back from the continent very soon [Signed John Hadfield]


London; Dear Sir, We attach a copy of a letter which we sent to you in New York on the 19th December last. [Signed MDW]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I am most interested to see in Howel Soskin's new catalogue that you have a new book [Signed John Hadfield]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I do not know whether this letter will reach you, but I am writing to say that we hold a cheque [Signed John Hadfield]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I have thought over our conversation carefully and have come to the conclusion [Signed E. F. Boyman]


London; Dear Madam, We have in preparation a book by Walter Allen, entitled TRADITION AND DREAM: [Signed Ursula Penfold]


London; Dear Lewis- Desmond Harmsworth arrived this morning from Paris & would be very glad to see you [Signed Winifred Henderson]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Thank you for your letter of March 23. I am very happy to think we have been able to come to terms [Signed Winifred Henderson]


London; Dear Lewis- I had hoped to hear from you by telephone to-day as the proofs were delivered her last night [Signed Winifred Henderson]


London; Dear Lewis, Thanks for your letter. I note that you are willing to adhere to the 10% clause for corrections [Signed Winifred Henderson]


London; Dear Lewis- I am not "turning on you" as you rather inappropriately describe it. All I am [?] is that you let me have the balance of copy [Signed Winifred Henderson]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, This is a formal statement by which we agree to allow you to make the corrections


London; Dear Lewis- There seems to be wholesale muddle about instructions for the printers regarding "The Enemy of the Stars" [Signed Winifred Henderson]


London; Dear Lewis, Enclosed are your proofs. Will you kindly return them at your very earliest convenience


London; My dear Lewis, I am disappointed on arriving from Paris to find that the whole of THE ENEMY OF THE STARS [Signed Desmond Harmsworth]


London; Dear Lewis, May we call in tomorrow at 4 o'clock? [Signed Desmond Harmsworth]


Paris; My dear Lewis, First, to say that I have just received, and inevitably read for the first time, proofs or "The Enemy of the Stars" [Signed Desmond Harmsworth]


Paris; My dear Lewis, Thank you for your letter, which I should have answered some days ago, and for your kind offer


London; Dear Lewis- With reference to my conversation with you by telephone of a few days ago in which I told you, [Signed Winifred Henderson]


Paris; My dear Lewis, After our nearly eight-months absence we are returning to England about the 1st April, [Signed Desmond Harmsworth]


Detrot; Dear Mr. Lewis: It develops that we had better schedule your talk in the museum's Tuesday evening program. [Signed Edgar P. Richardson]


Detrot; Dear Mr. Lewis: It develops that we had better schedule your talk in the museum's Tuesday evening program. [Signed Edgar P. Richardson]


Detrot; Dear Mr. Lewis: Our registrar tells me that the thing for you to do about bringting pictures across the border [Signed Edgar P. Richardson]


Detrot; My dear Mr. Lewis It was a very pleasant lunch the other day and I am flattered to have been able to throw some light on the USA [Signed Edgar P. Richardson]


Detrot; To whom it may concern: This is to say that I have lent to Mr. Lewis my copy of a book by Henry Miller [Signed Jane Himmelein


Detrot; Some of donors making difficulty would prefer group of drawings to paintings [Signed Edgar P. Richardson]


Detrot; Dear Lewis: I am sorry about the difficulty here. Because of the need to hurry I asked a contribution from one man [Signed Edgar P. Richardson]


Detrot; Dear Lewis: Your picture of the little Canadianne went off to you a fornight ago. I trust it will reach you [Signed Edgar P. Richardson]


Detrot; Dear Mr. Lewis: In the absence of Mr. Richardson I am answering your note of August 14, to say that your painting [Signed Clyde Burroughs]


Detrot; My dear Lewis. I have just been reading with a great deal of pleasure a book of yous "America". [Signed Edgar P. Richardson]


Detroit; Dear Mr. Lewis: Knowing how difficult it is to keep on hand a sufficient amount of typewritten publicity, [Signed Forence Davies]


Detroit; My dear Mr. Lewis: On Tuesday, February 22nd or 28th, in the morning, would you consent to speak to the memers [Signed Gladys Culbertson]


Cambridge; Sir. I have received from you a libellous letter dealing with the officies of the Omega Workship. You must be as stupid as you are malicious to send such a letter


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I have now had a talk with my colleagues, and I am delighted to say that we are prepared to make a contract for the books. [Signed Loval Dickson]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I see that Robert Hale is announcing a new book of yours on politics, to be called NEW POLITICS [Signed Loval Dickson]


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis. I have great pleasure in inviting you to attend a special service at Farm Street on the second Sunday of the month,


Torquay; Dear Madam, Further to our call on you this morning at Compton, when you provided us with a schedule of your furniture and effects to be packed


Torquay; Dear Madam, We are in receipt of your letter of May 8th concerning the removal of your property to Flat 2, Froyle House, Burridge Road, Chelsoton. [Signed W. S. J. Wilkinson]


Torquay; Dear Madam, We thank you for the return of the form of Acceptace, and for your letter, contents of which have been noted. We have therefore booked [Signed W.S.J. Wilkinson]


London; My dear Mr. Lewis, I must tell you how much I enjoyed our chat yesterday, and I hope you have not put yourself to too terrific hard work


Dear Mr. Lewis. If you have nothing else on, do come round on Tuesday evening some time after dinner. I wonder how you are getting on with the Fry campaign.


Cher-et-Loire; My dear Lewis. I had a card from Helen the other day, but no news of you - I hope things go on well. I am staying on here a bit longer


London; Dear Lewis. Thanks very much for the [pounds] 30 in bank notes received today.


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I am enclosing for your a rent book and 8/- which I owe you back from what you have already paid for this month.


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I am sorry you cannot come on Friday, but I should very much like to meet you at luncheon. I am afraid I am rather full this week,


London; Dear Lewis, I am very glad you wd. not object to my notice of "The Lion & the Fox." It is so difficult to express approval without appearing to patronise


Leeds; Dear Wyndham Lewis, It is indeed a long time since we met. I shall certainly be seeing you in the autumn as I am to have the honour of presenting you


Leeds; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I am very much looking forward to your coming up here. Please let me know if there is anything I can do to make things comfortable.


Leeds; My dear Wyndham Lewis, I have been away for a day or two and have just got your letter, which it was very nice of you to write. You know how very glad


Leeds; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I have been thinking about possible writers of the book about you. As you suggest, it must be somebody fairly senior,


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, We hope you will excuse this letter coming to you via Mr. Ayrton as we do not seem able to trace your address.


London; My dear Lewis. I have come to the conclusion that I shall not send the cheque as arranged yesterday morning, after akk tiy are tge ibe wgi us benefiting


London; [4 letters with request for legal and rental fees; 1 an 8 page listing of all the legal duties from August 1945 to May 1946, another an invoice with fees for drawing Lewis' will; two acknowledging the account payment [as folder 20 holds]; and another asking for rent arrears.]


London; Dear Sir, We acnowledge receipt of your cheque for [pounds] 2.10.0 received by us to-day further on account.


Round Hill, Va.; Dear W.L. Gertrude Stein spoke last night. I did not hear her. We have scarlet fever on the farm, the tenant's son. Grandmother died.


London; Dear W.L. May I come to tea with my brother this afternoon (Thursday) at five. Will you call the hotel leaving a message if it's all right.


Round Hill, Va.; Dear Wyndham Lewis. I am coming back again for whatever conflagration there may be. I will be in Berlin the last of April.


London; [Listing of Anthy d'Offay private viewing exhibition hours.]


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis: I am contemplating an exhibition of drawings and watercolours by Percy Wyndham Lewis and should be most grateful


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you very much for your letter dated Feb.22. I am interested in buying drawings by your husband


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Next year I shall be having an exhibition of abstract and Vorticist painting and sculpture, showing in particular work by your husband,


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, I am now making the final preparations for our Vorticist exhibition to be held in November. It will certainly be the most comprehensive since 1915.


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, I am sendingunder separate cover a catalogue of our forthcoming exhibition "Abstract Art in England 1913-1915",


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, I have just bought a collection of your husband's drawings and watercolours, and I am planning to have an exhibition


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, I have now definitely decided to hold the exhibition of your husband's drawings and watercolours in September, 1974.


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, I cannot tell you what a pleasure it was to meet you on Friday last. I was so happy to be able to show you the drawings


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you very much for your letter. I would be delighted to see the studies you mention and I wonder if we could arrange it this way.


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, I was glad to receive the four drawings safely on Friday last. I would be happy to pay you [pounds] 850.00 for them


London; Thank you very much for your kind letter. Please find enclosed my cheque for [pounds] 850.00. Would you please be good enough to sign one copy of the Purchase Note


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, I wonder ifyou can help me. I am trying to trace the Vorticist work of Helen Saunders and have been told that you might have something


London; Eduardo Paolozzi Colages and Drawings 23 March to 22 April 1977 Monday to Friday 10 to 5:30 Saturday 10 to 1. [Exhibition announcement]


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, I just wanted to let you know that we are organising a big Vorticist exhibition in New York, running from 5th to 30th April.


[New York] Dear Mr. Lewis: It was entirely in order foryou to write to me, and I am glad that you did so. Dexter Keezer has separated himself from Reed College,


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis: I have been just incoveniently ill, and therefore am late in acknowledging and thank you for the Enemy #2, which came in the same week


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis: I suppose my point about Berman is that, although you do not overrate him, and simply hold him up as a specimen to the masses of his kind,


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis: It is delightful to hear from you, and to see Yeats come out so roundly for "The Childermass". Have you sent the same clipping to Covici, Friede?


London; Dear Sir, Kindly let me have your large picture for the forthcoming show in, On Monday afternoon next, if possible between 1 and 2, [Signed Joseph Fishburn]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I am pleased to say I have sold your Nos. 187 and 188 for twelve guineas, this is not quite what you wanted, but you said I could take anything, [Signed Joseph Fishburn]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis- The Countess of Trogheda wants to see you most urgently at [?] 40 Hilton Cresent S.W. As soon as you receive this [Signed Joseph Fishburn]


New York; Dear Mr. Giovanelli: Thank you for your note of September 14 and for the information on Wyndham Lewis. We have come to no definite decision [Signed John T. Sargent]


New York; Dear Mr. Giovanelli:- Thank you so much for sending along the full list of names. We have covered them entirely, including the little magazines [Signed Louis Thomas]


New York; Dear Mr. Giovanelli, We enclose herewith royalty statement on AMERICAN AND COSMIC MAN by Wyndham Lewis for the six-month period [With ALS to Lewis on it.] [Signed John T. Sargent]


New York; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Thank you so much for your pleasant letter of the 7th. and for the enclosed review which I return to you now. [Signed John T. Sargent]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis, We were delighted that Felix Giovanelli gave us a chance to read your most interesting and provacative book, [Signed John T. Sargent]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis, The agreement did indeed reach me safely and the signatures are in order. We are very delighted too that Doubleday is publishing your book [Signed John T. Sargent]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis, My professional historian, who, as I suspected, was not too favorably inclined to your general thesis, nevertheless came up with one or two points [Signed John T. Sargent]


New York; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Thank you for your note of January 8. I am glad the Christmas package arrived and I only hope that its contents were suitable. [Signed John T. Sargent]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis, Your letter, the photographs, and the "vits" (where did that word ever come from" Giovanelli?) all arrived together, [Signed John T. Sargent]


New York; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I am happy to report that "The Saturday Review of Literature" bought from us a chapter (The Case Against Roots) [Signed John T. Sargent]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis:- I have your letter concerning the press clippings of "America and Cosmic Man". The reviews are alreading coming in [Signed Louis Thomas]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis, I feel extremely guilty because I have been so long in writingyou about RUDE ASSIGNMENT, and all the more so long because the news [Signed John T. Sargent]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis, I'm returning the John Vickers photographs, which you were good enough to let us have, under separate cover, [Signed John T. Sargent]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis:- I'm sorry for the delay in sending your reviews; I know how anxious you must be to see them. As you will see for yourself [Signed Louise Thomas]


Amherst; My dear Mrs. Lewis. I can scarcely realize that almost a year has passed since I received your last letter, and [?] lots of Percy and that I have acknowledged neither


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you for sending me the folder of contracts and correspondence with Methuen's. I think that , before I make any approach [Signed Bruce Douglas-Mann]


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you for your letter of 6th March. I am accepting the offer of [pouns] 30., from Pickfords. I have passed the correspondence and contracts that you sent to me [Signed Bruce Douglas-Mann]


London; [20 letters between Douglas, Solicitor, and Lewis regarding legal assistance and 1 invoice.]


London; Dear Mr. Nevinson. Drogheda & I are both coming to hear Signor Marinetti lecture tomorrow Thursday at 9 p.m. - on futurism in the Dore Gallery.


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Do please come & see me if you have time tomorrow Thursday at 1/4 to 3. I should so love you to do a frieze for me - & I will get the decorator


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, 1) I have great pleasure in acceptingyou kind estimate. 2) I should be grateful if you could come & see the room again


Voorhout; Dear Sirs, We kindly beg you to inform us if the dutch translation-rights of Wyndham Lewis: TARR are free yet. If so, we should esteem it a favor


New York;Dear Mr. Lewis: We have beenmost interested to read about you new novel, SELF CONDEMNED, in Methuen's spring catalog. [Signed Charles Duell]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis, It was good of you so promptly to get us a coy of SELF CONDEMNED for publishing consideration. [Signed Charles Duell]


Rochester; Dear Mr. Lewis: I felt sad yesterday when I read your letter to the Sturday Review concerning your article


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Eliot gave me your address just after Christmas and before leaving for South Africa.


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Sorry our theatre telephonew were all frozen out from the burst cable that morning,


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis. If this is yours, it has not been long delayed, for I call at the Garrick Club


Bad Gastein, Austria; In a room on this cascade I spend a fifteenth of my life - 3 1/2 weeks a year. Hope to call on you


London My dear Froanna. I had a talk yester with Tom Eliot at the Garrick, and he wanted to know just how thaings stand with you. [Also on same side and verso TLS to T. S. Eliot, n.d.]


London; Dear Lady Cunard, Please forgive a typewritten letter. I shall be delighted to see Wyndham Lewis any time


[n.p.] Dear Mr. Lewis- I enclose a cheque $65 - I hope there'll be more. My only trouble is that I am so frantic with prize books


[n.p.] [List of 10 Lewis drawings, with prices.]


Sault Ste. Marie; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Thank you for your letter of the 13th. I was impressed by your very direct portrait


Sault Ste. Marie; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I have your letter of July 4th and hope to be in Toronto about the end of this week


Bath; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, I must apologise so much for not returning these books to you sooner.


Bath; Dear Mrs. Lewis, First thank you so very much for letting me come over to see you last Monday. I so much enjoyed meeting you


Bath; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I am writing extremely tenttively to ask you whether you would consider allowing me


Bath; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, I was so delighted to get in touch with you yesterday. Omar Pound suggested about two months ago


Edgbaston, Birmingham; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I was to have visited you, in Torquay on the 21st of this month


Edgbaston, Birmingham; Dear Mrs. Lewis, How are you? keeping well I hope. Some time ago, in the summer,


Edgbaston, Birmingham; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I trust that you are keeping well during this heatwave? Do you remeber


Edgbaston, Birmingham; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Thanks for your recent letter, and I'm sorry about the delay in my reply.


Edgbaston, Birmingham; [Christmas card]


Edgbaston, Birmingham; Alan Munton & I hope to see you soon. [Christmas card]


Edgbaston, Birmingham; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Forgive me for not having contacted you now for several months


Edgbaston, Birmingham; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Several years ago, whilst at art college, I became interested in the drawing and painting of Wyndham Lewis


Edgbaston, Birmingham; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I'm a post graduate student, working at Nottingham University; on a thesis,


Edgbaston, Birmingham; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Thanks for your kind letter, replying to my request for an interview.


Edgbaston, Birmingham; Dear Mrs. Lewis, First things first: thanks again for your hospitality, and the loan of "The Enemy",


Edgbaston, Birmingham; Dear Mrs. Lewis, First let me say that I hope your health may improve with the weather.


Edgbaston, Birmingham; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Thanks for your letter. You didn't say whether you wished me to by[sic] you a copy


Edgbaston, Birmingham; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Thanks for yr. letter, and invitation. It's rather strange; the copy of "Men Without Art"


Edgbaston, Birmingham; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Frist of all I trust that the climate in southern Englad is fine, and that you are in good health


Edgbaston, Birmingham; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I trust that you are keeping well. I believe that I am scheduled to come


Edgbaston, Birmingham; Dear Mrs. Lewis, How are you? I trust that the winter months in Torquay haven't been too hard.


Edgbaston, Birmingham; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Many thanks for your hospitality the other day, and thank you once again for the gift


Edgbaston, Birmingham; Dear Mrs. Lewis, How are you? Keeping well during this peculiar summer I hope.


Edgbaston, Birmingham; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I trust that you are keeping well - did you recieve [sic] the card and letter that I sent


Edgbaston, Birmingham; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I write to confirm that Dick Humphries, Alan Munton and myself


London; Dear Sirs, Owing to insurmountable staff difficulties, we are being compelled to close the department


Durban; Messrs Webster Steel and Co London instructed fourth October to receive and pay for Eliot portrait


New York; Dear Mr. Spicer-Simson: We do appreciate very much indeed your kindness and that of Mr. Brooks


London; My dear Lewis, One-Way Song is tremendous. I got no conception of its grip and scope from the few extracts


London; Dear Lewis, Here are the letters, which, while proclaiming mea culpa, I thank you for reminding me about.


Martha's Vineyard; Dear Alick: In return for the book you sent me, and which I have not even yet found time to read, I am sending you a copy [On verso, ALS to Schepeler from Eliena Eastman.]


Hull; ... to plan for an important exhibition proper which will take place there in 1966, and would naturally wish to represent your husband's work


Hull; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you very much for your kind letter of December 7th. I would certainly not expect you to give us a picture,


London; This is notstalgic sort of - because the other day I heard you were "downstairs" at Hutchinson's - so look forward to the autobiography - I must keep off writing mine!


Boston; Dear Mr. Lewis: I have just been reading your AMERICA AND COSMIC MAN, and feel called upon to spring to the defense of BBC news announcers


Hemel Hempstead; Dear Sir, I am writing to express my grateful thanks to you for the many interesting hours I have enjoyed reading, re-reading & then placing permanently at my bedside


Paris; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I am writing to you on behalf of my friend and colleague Bernard Lafourcade from Tunis who gave me your personal address.


London; Dear Sirs, We are as anxious as Mr. Wyndham Lewis to see the early publication of his book "America and Cosmic Man". [Signed Tambimuttu]


London; Dear Sirs, This is in acknowledgement of your letter of 23rd May. I much regret that you should see any innuendo against your client in my letter [Signed Nicholas Moore]


London; Dear Sirs, With reference to your letter of the 16th May we will be glad to revoke our contract for Chateau Rex on condition that you client repays [Signed Tambimuttu]


London; Dear Sirs, "America and Cosmic Man" We are in receipt of your letter of the 16th instant relating to the agreement between ourselved and Mr. Wyndham Lewis for the publication [Signed Richard March]


London; Yes, make all the corrections you want. We won't charge you for them. I am glad you are re-writing the first chapter. Sorry there are so many mistakes [Signed Tambimuttu}


London; Tambi is having a party at his flat next Friday (122th) 7.30ish. He wondered if you would like to come. His address is 19 Argent's Park Terrace. [Signed Michael Swan]


London; John Roberts away will wire you later. [Signed Tambimutttu]


London; Dear Wyndham, If you will deliver the second half of the Ms. of America & Cosmic Man this week we will have proofs ready for you by the end of next week. [Signed Tambimutttu]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Thank you for returning the book so quickly. The enclosed were found inside and have just been returned to us. [Signed Helen Scott]


London; Appointment Wednesday twolve o'clock [Signed Tambimutttu]


London; Thank you for sending (a) the proofs, (b) the blurb and (c) the list of books to face title page. They arrived this morning. [Signed Helen Scott]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, In Tambi's absence, I am returning your contract for "Chateaux Rex" with Clause 13 deleted, as you wished. [Signed Helen Scott]


London; Out[sic] letter 21 st June said we were enclosing final proofs for your approval stop we also sent you your corrected proofs of second part [Signed Tambimutttu]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis,We sent you first proofs of "America and Cosmic Man" in April and again in May, since you had mislaid the original set. [Signed Tambimutttu]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis,Would you very kindly return the proofs of "America and Cosmic Man" as soon as possible. The printers are anxious to continue [Signed Helen Scott]


London; Urgent that proofs are returned


London; Dear Wyndham, The printers are troubling us for the proofs of "American and Cosmic Man" and I will be very glad if you will return them [Signed Tambimutttu]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, We have pleasure in sendingyou herewith our cheque for [pounds] 75. being one half of the advance due on the Freedom Book [Signed Richard March]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, We are sending you in a day or two your copy of the T. S. Eliot book which is now ready, and which will be punctually published [Signed Richard March]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Following our verbal agreement we hereby confirm that we have no objection if you should choose to use that portion of your book [Signed Richard March]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, We beg to acknowledge receipt of the two remaining chapters of your book - The Rot and The Conclusion, which we will now add [Signed P. A. Hartley]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you for your letter of Dec 27. Mr March, who is dealing with this matter personally, is away on holiday [Signed Laurence Clark]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I came back from France a few days ago where I have had to be unavoidably owing to the recent death of my father [Signed Richard March]


Madrid; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Thank you very much for your kind letter dated March 27 and your permission to reproduce the work "The Crowd" [Signed Agustia S. Luqus


Barcelona; Dear Mrs. Lewis, We are writing to you following instructions from the Tate Gallery. Our Publishing House is preparing a History of the XX Century Art [Signed R. Andreu]


Turin; Dear Sirs, We are interested in "Tarr" by Wyndham Lewis. Can yo send us a reading copy with an option? Thanking you in advance, we are [Signed Drielso?]


Nedlands, Australia; Dear Mr. Lewis, I've just had the pleasure - the very lively pleasure - of reading "Rude Assignment" and would like to tell you


Berkeley, Ca.; Dear Mr. Lewis: For the past two years I have been collecting materials for a critical biography of Ezra Pound. In this process I have ranged


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis. Please forgive me for not having written earlier to thank you for entertaining Cy and me on our visit to you. I've been very busy


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis. I hope you're well, and that the weather in Torquay is a bit milder than here in London. I remember when I came down to see you


[Maredon?] My dear Anne, I still feel very abshed at forgetting to get Gran down to Torquay Station & so ruined your trip to Exeter. I am truly sorry, [With TL[fragment]S and birthday card]


Las Palmas; [Invoice for Pasaje]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Mr. Eliot asked me to thank you for your note of the 31st. He can lunch either on Tuesday, the 8th, or Thursday the 10th.


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Mr. Eliot asked me to thank you foryour note, and to say that he will be pleased to lunch with you next Tuesday,


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, In reply to your telegram, Mr. I. A. Richards address is:- 41 Kirkland Street, Cambridge 38, Massachusetts.


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Mr. Eliot asked me to thank you for your letter of June 9th. Would it be convenient if he called to see you on Tuesday, June 26th?


London; Dear Mr. Sir, I am writing on behalf of Mr. Eliot, to thank you for your kindness in sending him a copy of "Self Condemned", which I will show him


London; Dear Mr. Sir, Mr. Eliot asked me to let you know that on looking up the correspondence, he fins that what the "Hudson Review" wanted was "an article


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Mr. Eliot has asked me to thank you for your constant enquiries afterhim, and to express his appreciation of your kindness.


London; How are you? Have been out of action following an emergency operation for perikontis in July. Now well again. [Christmas card]


London; Do let us meet in the New Year. I am just back from a lengthy visit to American where I worked on "The Waste Land" manuscript. [Christmas card]


London; [Christmas card]


London; How are you? Do you ever come to town? It would be nice to see you. [Christmas card]


London; I have telephoned you unsuccessfully. Please ring 937 0909 on reverse charges one evening when you feel like a chat. [Christmas card]


London; Do let me have your address & some news! [Christmas card]


London; Dear Froanna, I was surprised to learn when I telephoned your old address this morning that you had left a fortnight ago. I hope you are happy [With ALS to Eliot from Dorothy Pound]


London; My dear Froanna, I was delighted to get your letter, and have some direct news from you at last. It is distressing to hear that you suffer from arthritis,


Cambridge, Mass.; Dear Mr. Lewis, Mrs. Eliot heard some gossip yesterday to the following effect: it seems that Prof. Julian Lowell Cooledge, Master of Lowell House,


Cambridge, Mass.; Dear Mr. Lewis, In re yours of April 1: Mrs. E. saw Ted Spencer the other day, and he said that the way to go about that business was to approach,


Cambridge, Mass.; Dear Lewis: Yours of the 26th received only yesterday, we having been for a few days up at Dublin, N.H., using Aimee Lamb's cottage;


Cambridge, Mass.; Dear Lewis: Yours received. I have sent it to Tom Metcalf of the Museum of Modern Arts here, which is to move into a new building soon.


Cambridge, Mass.; Dear Lewis: As you will see, I addressed a letter to you at a defunct address. I have now your letter back from Metcalf,


Cambridge, Mass.; Dear Lewis: Metcalfe telephoned me today, and said that he had talked with the Grace Horne Galleries in Boston, and that they were very receptive


Evanston, Ill.; Dear Mrs. Lewis, My biography of Joyce is at last done, in a thousand pages, and the Oxford University Press is planning to publish it


Evanston, Ill.; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I wrote you to your old address but the letter was returned to me, and I have only just learned of this new address,


Evanston, Ill.; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Thank you very much for your kind letter, which I received yesterday. I much appreciate your courtesy in allowing me


Evanston, Ill.; Dear Mr. Lewis, I expect to be in London during the second week of March, and should be greatly obliged if you would permit me to call upon you


Amsterdam; Madam, For publication of the book Winkler Prins Grote Wereldgeschiedenis (world history) we intend to use the painting "The Crowd"[Signed Len v.d. Berg]


London; Dear Mr.[sic] Lewis, I refer to our telephone conversation of to-day regarding the delivery of your paintings. The name of the transport company [With List of the paintings sent from the Canadian Customs Broker Signed Iris. E. Abbott]


Dear Mrs. Lewis, I have recently obtained from the Tate Gallery a black and white photograph of the painting "The Crowd" by Percy Wyndham Lewis, [Signed Joseph Azizollahoff]


Chicago; Der Mrs. Lewis: We would like to reproduce a painting of "The Crawd" 9formerly known as "Revolution") by Percy Wyndham Lewis [Signed Jeannine Deubel]


Zurich; Dear Sir, In our encyclopedia, called "Schweizer Lexikon", which we are going to publish, we have the intention to cite your esteemed name. [Signed Sandert]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis: You may, or may not have heard that we are pursuing a policy here of trying to refresh the theatre by inducing serious writers to take part. [Signed George Devine]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis: Thank you very much for your letter. I am thrilled to think that there is a chance you might write a play. I will take up your kind suggestion [Signed George Devine]


Dublin; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Mr. Cullen of Methuen's whom I met recently in Paris told me about your forthcoming book "Rotting Hill". [Signed Michael Heron]


Dublin; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Many thanks for your letter & offer of a story from "Rotting Hill". I have only just returned from London [Signed Michael Heron]


Munich; Dear Mr. Lewis, I found out recently that even "The Human Age", to say nothing of your other books, ghas as yet not bee published in German,


London; My dear Wyndham. I see you still persist in taking gossip seriously. I never do or else I should have bashed your head in long ago


London; Dear Lewis. No thought was further from my mind than to act as go between for Malene[?] Strindberg & I am sorry you imagined that was my motive


London; My dear Lewis. I differ from you as to the relative importance of your paragraphs. The idea you have somehow got of being "unwelcome"


London; Dear Mr. Lewis- I didn't come the other day as the toe was so black I thought it would have been to dark to draw. Shall I come Saturday


St. Louis; My dear Mr. Lewis: A party who is writing a book on nerve physiology would like to have for publication in it the fugure on the card


London; Dear Madam, We have been consulted by your husband about the unhappy position which has arisen between you and he instructs us to send you


London; Dear Sir, re: Your Maintenance Affairs. A note of our charges in the above mentioned matter amounting to 6 guineas was rendered to you [Signed Ernest W. Long]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you for your most helpful letter, which sets out pretty well all the information I am likely to need [Signed W. H. Betts]


Essen; Sehr geehrter Herr Lewis! Ich war verreist und stelle nach Ruckkehr von meiner Reise zu meiner Freude fest, [Signed D. R. [Drsodfingers]]


Essen; Sehr geehrter Herr Lewis! Herr Dr. Brodfuhrer ist fur 3 Wochen in Ferien gefahren, sodass er Ihren Brief vom 6. Mai nicht beantworten kann. [Signed undecipherable]


London; Lewis knows my opinion of the various questions that are coming up. I give him full power to vote for me.


London; My dear Lewis. Here is my address. I meant to have sent it before to you. I'm afraid I've done little in the way of "projectious" I've been settingon a low deck chair


London; My dear Lewis. This is rather amusing. I copy from [Dostoriffsky's sic] "Idiot": The Prince enters "cultured" Society for the first time.


London; My dear Lewis. I have made 3 ineffectual attempts to see you at your studio door. Will you come round some evening to Bessboro' Pl.


Henley; Dear Lewis, I was very glad to get your letter, which has followed me from Hastings, up North, and finally here. I'm glad to hear you are managing another number of Blast.


London; My dear Lewis. I had meant to answer your letter long ago. I have been very much rushed, & pushed about over money worries also.


London; My dear Fred, I was glad to get yr letter to know how you were & also if you had got the parcel's allright. I got yr Father's cold & have had a week in bed


Berlin; Dear Mr. Lewis, Very many excuses for not answering your kind letter at once. I was very much obliged to you indeed for helping me with so detailed annotations [Signed Joachim Moras]


Berlin; My dear Mr. Lewis, I certainly should not be astonished if you were very angry with me for not having answered your kind letters of March 9 and 13. [Signed Joachim Moras]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Many thanks for yours of the 18th May. The wire from the Insel Verlag re "Time and Western Man" has not reached us [Signed C. H. Brooks]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I have just returned from Germany where I talked with Alexander - our representative in that country[Signed C. H. Brooks]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Reimar Hobbing has not confirmed the tentative offer I made to you by telephone the other day, and I am consequently sending you herewith a draft [Signed C. H. Brooks]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I have pleasure in sending you herewith a counterpart of the agreement you signed for the German rights of "Hitler" [Signed C. H. Brooks]


London; Dear Jessie, I found your note on Wyndham Lewis interesting, and I should like to publish someting in "The Criterion" about Lewis,


[London] [Christmas card]


[London] [Christmas card]


[London] [Christmas card]


[London] [Christmas card]


[London] Dear Froanna, I must apologise for having been so long in answering your letter of the 9th, but I was reather under the weather - that is to say, under the fog


[London] Dear Mrs. Lewis, Mr. Eliot has asked me to send you the enclosed proof of an article which was published in "The Hudson Review" [Signed Susan F. MacEwen]


[London] Dear Froanna, Unfortunately, April 9th is the day on which we have had to ask some American cousins, briefly in London, to dine with us.


[London] Dear Froanna, I am writing this hurried line tonight - we leave early tomorrow morning - to tell you how very sorry I was - and how very sorry Valerie was,


[London] Dear Froanna, I am sendingyou under separate cover, by Registered Post, all the letters from Wyndham Lewis that can be traced.


[London] Dear Froanna, I was very glad to get your second letter, together with the proof of ONE-WAY SONG, and to hear that White was active.


[London] Dear Froanna, This is to confirm what I said in our telephone conversation the day before yesterday. Alan White will give a fee of [pounds] 30 for the Preface


[London] Dear Froanna, I hope that you have now received the proof copy of the letters, which I gave out to be returned to you before I received your letter of the 17th.


[London] Dear Froanna, Thank you for your letter of October 14th, with enclosures. I had already written to Alan White, objecting the the first sentence


[London] Dear Froanna, I have your letter of the 28th with enclosures. I will check your list of deletions to see with which I agree. I gather from White


[London] Dear Froanna, The enclosed letter which I have not see is from a man who said he wished to write to you about some matter on which he is I believe writing himself


[London] Greetings of the Season/ As Mr. and Mrs. T.S. Eliot are abroad, they are neither sending nor expecting Christmas cards this year,


[London] Dear White, Excuse me for bombarding you with correspondence. I have just realized that, from my point of view, time rather presses


[London] Dear Lewis, My apology was for the one point which seems to me to require an apology. For the rest it is a pity that we have not a higher opinion of each others characters,


[London] Have been delayed, but expect to have something for you in a few days. Would you object to something about Whitehead,


[London] Dear Lewis, I saw Mary Sinclair & she is going away again on the 8th. I took the liberty of mentioning your books. She said Hutchinson was good


[London] Dear Lewis, I'm afraid, you were right. I look it up and found Lawrence was just under 9000 words. I do understand your difficulty [Copies have two other letters from Eliot: May 13, 1924 and Feb. 24, 1924.]


[Paris?] I sent Fritz a card to say I would fetch him about 5-6. If he dines with me I will return here before dinner. Or better still, come on to his flat


[London] Dear Lewis, Very many thanks. If you will send MSS. as soon as ready there will always be someone here, or they will be quite safe [Copies contain two other letters from Eliot: [n.d.] in folder 23 and August 3, 1921]


[London] Dear Wyndham Lewis, Being in bed with a cold too, I think Wednesday is safer. I will meet you at Versangten[?] Palace Hotel at 8 as you suggest.


[London] Dear Lewis, I want to get at Lady Cunard at once if she is in town. I have been having a row with the Navy here and I want to see Admiral Sims -Copies have second Eliot letter of Oct. 18, 1920.


[London] Dear Lewis, I'll come in certainly on Friday, as I can't on Thursday. Vivian is supposed to be going to a dance with Rodker, & she says she hopes


[London] Dear W. L., I now find it will suit me better to come to Redfern after lunch - around 3 I expect.


[London] Dear Lewis, I am supposed to be ill and have been at home for 2 days having the time in finishing my book. I shall be back again on Friday.


[London] Dear Lewis, Will you please not mention to anybody what I told you this afternoon about the possibility of my going away for two or three months. [Copy has another Eliot letter of June 18, 1921.]


[London] Dear Lewis, I shall be up in town on Friday. Will you let me know whether you can meet me for lunch


[London] Dear Lewis, I have been trying to get hold of you but have so far failed. Am trying to get into U.S. Navy [Copies also have another letter from Eliot, Aug.11, 1918]


Marlow; Dear Lewis, I am going to see Schick in the morning, and I am not going to the bank at all, as I want to get my physical


[London] Dear Lewis, Thanks for your address. I should have communicated before but have been in almost hourly consultation [Copy has another Eliot letter, December 8, 1922]


[London] My dear Lewis, You may already have left for Hastings but if not I trust it will do you good and that the strike will not prevent


[London] Dear Lewis, Thank you very much for the Tyro which has just arrived; I am writing at once before reading it


[London] Dear Lewis, I am very sorry to find that tomorrow afternoon will be impossible - we are getting in -


Lausanne; I wish you wd. send me the criticism you said you would write, please. I shall be here till Christmas.


[London] Dear Lewis, I have been absolutely taken up the last en days with the hell of moving etcs., and very tired and depressed.


[London] Dear Lewis, I should like to see you on a matter of business: Can you meet me on Sunday evening


[London] Dear Lewis, Send the essays along as soon as you can, and give me a few days to read them carefully,


Chichester; Dear Lewis, I got your letter forwarded this morning. I am awfully sorry I missed you, and that you are going away;


[London] Dear Lewis, Many thanks. May I take it that we shall have deinitely 1. Mr. Zagneus for Jan.no.


[London] Dear Lewis, Thanks for your leltter. I expect to be in my office up to one o'clock tomorrow, after that less certain.


[London] Dear Wyndham, I am sorry about the cheque. You should have received it about four days ago but for distractions on my part.


[London] Dear Lewis, I have waited to answer your letter until I had the time to deal with it as thoroughly as I could.


[London] Dear Lewis, I suppose you will be printing a brief rejoinder to Bell? He has certainly not replied, [Copies contain another 2 Eliot letters, both undated.]


[London] Dear Lewis, I have now heard from Schiff and I believe I am to see him on Saturday. I suppose you have already seen him.


[London] Dear Lewis, Many thanks for the fresh MSS. I will do as you say. I hope it will do if I return you the part you want


[London] Dear Lewis, I am sorry I did not answer the door this afternoon but I was in bed and did not want to get up


[London] Dear Lewis, You have impassed yourself & everything. It is worthwhile running the Criterion just to publish them.


London; ?Apes? Z. is a masterpiece. Want Apes at once.


[London] Dear Lewis, I presume that you received your proof direct this morning as I received one copy.


[London] Dear Lewis, I have got back and want to see you soon. I cannot manage this week but will you let me know what evening


London; Very many thanks for punctual MS. I shall expect the others during the week. Excellent. If you can send me this week


[London] Dear Lewis, I do not know in the least what you mean by "sound economic factors at work on my side."


London; Dear Lewis, After two frantic letters from Schiff requesting and entreating me to grant him an interview


[London] Dear Lewis, Thanks for your letter. I am glad to hear that you will go and I shall see you there.


London; I have been very harrassed & occupied. Could we meet directly after Christmas - say Monday or Tuesday week?


[London] Dear Lewis, I have been ill in bed with influenza and bronchitis, hence the delay. Whibley says he does not expect to be in London


[London] Dear Lewis, I have your letter dated the 30th January. You are certainly entitled to some explanation of the advertisement


[London] Dear Lewis, As I am unable to attend to much correspondence at present - indeed my last letter you was much the longest


London; I have received your registered letter. I am at present quite unable to deal with correspondence but your letter shall be answered


[London] Dear Lewis, Your essay reached me after - as I found by telephoning to Aylesbury or the Apse Crierion had already been set


London; Dear Lewis, This is the first opportunity I have had to reply to your letter. I shall be very glad to discuss the matter


London; Dear Lewis, I have your letter of the 8th instant As I know nothing whatever about the matter of Whibley


[London] Dear Lewis, I return you MS. as you request, but bear in mind that it would have suited me perfectly for October,


London; Thanks for yours. I am ill, harrassed, impoverished. I am going to have 5 teeth out. I have managed to avoid seeing anyone


[London] Dear Lewis, I simply don't understand you at all. If you are dissatisfied please explain with figures.


London; Dear Lewis, I enclose a statement from Cobden Sanderson of monies paid you. The extra [pounds] 3.14 -can very well go in as an additional payment [With the mentioned statement.]


London; Dear Lewis, What I am doubtful of is whether it is possible to get into "The Times" a letter obviously pointed against another newspaper.


London; Dear Lewis, I have been back in London since Christmas day but have been too busy to write and thank you for your letter which was forwarded to me in France.


London; Dear Lewis, Thanks for your note and for the circular of Chatto and Windus. The advertisement of your book is all right. Will you ask them to send us a review copy


[London] Dear Lewis, I quite understand your inability to do anything in the way of a regular art chronicle or even any occasional writing about matters


London; Dear Lewis, Here is MSS. What I have read I like exceedingly. If you will return it by Wednesday night I shall have read it all by Monday;


London; Dear Lewis, Your manuscript received and I am reading it. Your book having just arrived from Chatto and Windus, I think it is desireable


London; Dear Lewis, I am glad to hear from you. "The Art of Being Rules" is being reviewed at some length by a young man who seems to be very keen about it


London; Dear Lewis, I have just returned from abroad. I have not been able to get anything done while away, but am writing to say that if it is not too late


London; Dear Lewis, I am highly pleased and flattered at having the advance copy of your book with inscription, and intend to read it during the Christmas holidays.


London; Dear Wyndham, I have just read "The Enemy" and beg to give you my warmest compliments upon it. "The New Criterion" is about to be transformed into a monthly


London; Dear Wyndham, I shall be glad to fix next Tuesday. Call for me at 24 Russell Square, or write there if you prefer to choose another place of meeting.


[London] Dear Lewis, Referring to my last: my father-in-law died this morning, and on Tuesday I shall have to go to Eastbourne for the funeral.


London, Dear Lewis, I am sorry to hear that you are leaving so soon and that tomorrow is impossible. Let me know as soon as you return.


London, Dear Wyndham, Very many tanks for your kind letter and for the presentation copy of your book. I have just returned from Paris and find an enormous amount of work


London, Dear Lewis,


London, My dear Lewis, Thanks for your note. I am sorry that there seems to have been a misunderstanding. I certainly thought you meant that Thorpe was your first choice


London, My dear Wyndham, I am glad if you are, in principle, satisfied with Thorpe. I myself was not particularly glad of either Thorpe or Birrell,


London, dear Wyndham: I have returned on Friday from abroad. If you are in London, I should particularly like to see you. Dinner any evening next week,


London, Dear Wyndham, I have returned to London. If you are in town will you dine early next week? Shd. like to see you. I am free at present any night


London, Dear Wyndham, It seems pretty certain that "The Criterion" will continue in quarterly form. If you are in London could you manage one day next week for lunch?


London, Dear Lewis, I was away when you & letter came. Is there any evening next week? I am not free on Wednesday. Suggest two evenings if you can, [With a second short note from Elliot.]


London, Dear Lewis, I am sorry to hear your news. I willl mention you in my prayers. I am here until the 31st July, and again from the 10th August


London, Dear Lewis, I am glad to hear from you. I am just off to-day for a fortnight's holiday, and expect to be back on the 24th. I should like to arrange a meeting with you


London, Dear Lewis, I learn from the Telegraph that your portrait of me has been rejected by the Academy. For my own part, I will not disguise my feeling of relief.


London, Dear Lewis, I am sorry to say that the estimates turn out to make the book of reproductions too expensive for us to takle, at the present time


London, Dear Lewis, I got this address some time ago from on John Reid, and have been meaning to write ever since. But in these times one has to write more letters than ever,


London, Dear Lewis, I was waiting to hear from you. At the present time I am not very well and prefer not to be out in the evening very often.


London, Dear Lewis, You seem to have misprised my meaning. I did not mean that I cannot go out at night, but that I cannot go out often; twice a week


London, Dear Lewis, Thank you for yours of the 23rd. I am very glad if the arrangements about your book have been settled to your satisfaction.


London, Dear Wyndham, I have here a letter from Ezra referring to yourself and I don't think that I can do better than pass it on to you. I think he would like very much to hear from you


London, Dear Lewis, I should have answered your letter long ago, but I have been paralysed by this weather, and have not done many things I should have done.


London, Can now arrive 7.15.


London, Dear Lewis, I should have thanked you for two letters which reached me just before I left Princeton. I was very rushed at that time


London, Dear Lewis, I have found your two letters after all; I had forgotten that I brought one batch with me, which I had not yet had time to look over.


London, My dear Lewis, I am sorry for my long silence, but I have kept finding from week to week that I have been unable to escape as many evening engagements


London, My dear Lewis, Good. In that case would you meet me at Frascati's on Thursday the 24th at seven o'clock. I don't suppose it is necessary to book a table


London, Dear Lewis, I am now back from Suffolk. There was no mistake about the cheque: it seemed to me that I might do something a little nearer the real market value


London, Dear Lewis, Thanks for your note. I write to assure you that I was not influenced by any supposed suggestion in your letter but solely by my own inclination


London, My dear Lewis, Thanks for your letter of the 2nd September which contitutes a kind of testimonial which I wish to preserve for posterity.


London, My dear Lewis, We have had no further communication from Hendley-Read, so I am writing to let you know the result of our estimate of the book.


London, Dear Wyndham Lewis, You mentioned the other day that there was some question of your being invited to give a course in Philosophy at some American University


London, My dear Lewis, We have just had a proposal from a certain Charles Handley-Read who wants to do a book about you. This is not a catalogue raisonnne


London, Dear Lewis, I have been at home for a week with a bad attack of bronchitis; but I expect to be back at work on Monday. This morning I.A. Richards,


London, My dear Lewis, I have your letter of July 1st. I see your point about the other artist, but I don't think there is much likelihood of my consenting to sit for anyone else.


London, My dear Lewis, The question of the portrait now appears to be a fait accompli. Richards wrote a very enthusiastic letter to the Master on the strength


London, Dear Lewis, I transmit herewith a copy of a letter I have just received from the Master of Magdalene. I do not know what frames cost


Southwold, Suffolk; Dear Lewis, Cheque herewith. I am here till August 4th. I can't do much from here as I have not typewriter. Why don't you write to the Master


High Wycombe, Bucks.; Dear Lewis, Will it suit you equally well to come in Sunday night instead of Saturday night at the same hour, about 8.30.


London, My dear Wyndham, You are quite right - no one else has yet remarked that Julia is a niece of Mrs. Porter, and that Reilly's mother was a Sweeney


London, Dear Lewis, I brought up the proposal of your book as outlined in your letter of September 12th, to my Board, when they met on Thursday last


London, Dear Lewis, I got back ten days before Christmas, but since then have had two short attacks of bronchitis, which has interfered with my routine.


London, Dear Lewis, I have been back in London for over a fortnight, but returned with a cold contracted in Madrid, which I am only just shaking off.


London, Dear Lewis, I was glad to get your letter of the 4th. Wednesday the 13th does not appear to be very good, as I have got a Committee all afternoon,


London, Dear Wyndham, I found this morning, with great pleasure, your book on my desk, inscribed. I have so far only read the preface; but I see


London, Dear Wyndham, Let us go to the Hyde Park Hotel then and dine about 7.30. If your wife is not able to come, shall I stop in and pick you up


London, Dear Lewis, Thank you for your note of the 31st. It had been on my mind for some time to get in touch with you and propose dinner either at your flat


London, Dear Lewis, The enclosed (which I have had for some time) is pretty grim, but fairly exact. I have asked that American lawyer, Rufus King,


London, Dear Lewis, I am sorry to have been so long in answeringyour letter of November 23rd about Pound. The first question about any public agitation


London, Dear Lewis, Thank you for your letter of the 19th. As you say, I can't start on anything now, even if I knew exactly what to start on:


London, Dear Lewis, As you may or may not have heard, I came down with this heart trouble very soon after getting back from South Africa;


London, My dear Lewis, I've been through MONSTRE GAI twice, but I can't yet give more than an interim report. I believe, with the assistance of the two passages


London, Dear Lewis, On another reading: I get the impression that you want to distinguish between Death on Earth - the process by which people get from Earth


London, Dear Lewis, Thank you for your letter of the 11th. I don't seem to have kept any copy of my note of the 9th, but I don't know that it matters.


London, Dear Lewis, Here is a draft of my note. If you will let me have your comments and criticisms, I will have it typed out properly, and will send one copy to you,


London, Dear Lewis, I'm sorry that I shan't be able to dine on Thursday after all, as my doctor wants me to get to the seaside for as much time as possible


London, Dear Lewis, Thank you for your letter of the 19th. I had heard rumours to the effect that you were engaged on a novel and am very glad to have them confirmed.


London, Dear Lewis, Thanks for your note of the 22nd. I'll turn up at Kensington Gardens Studios at 7 o'clock on November 3rd. I have not been ill.


[Mainly London; Xerox copies of all correspondence of Eliot to Lewis.]


London; Dear Mr. Russell, I must reply very briefly to your two letters. I should feel it an obligation to agree to the request to take the chair for you


London; My dear Swabey, I am sorry that I have been very busy indeed, with the additional reasons of having been away so long in Germany,


Washington; Dear Mr. Lewis: On behalf of the Librarian I am acknowledging your letter of November 7. I shall pass the word along to Mr. Douglass [Chief Assistant Library, Library of Congress]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Just a note to say how much I enjoyed my visit on Saturday and to mention that Winsor and Newton.- I am told - have a fairly large stock of permanent oil colours


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I would very much enjoy a talk with you again on Saturday if you are at home. Kind regards to you and Mrs. Lewis.


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Thank you very much for the note. I will bring some things along as you suggest on Saturday about 5 or so if that is suitable.


Durban; My Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Dr. May knows that I have a very great admiration for your work as a painter and writer, has asked me to write to you


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, If you are at home and it is convenient, I would very much like to call on you again about tea time on Saturday


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Here is a copy of the letter to New Statesman - also a [?] from Picture Post that might be handy.


London; Dear Mr.Wyndham Lewis, First let me thank you & Mrs. Lewis for a delightful evening last Tuesday. I am looking forward to seeing you both


London; Sir, Your Art Critic's enthusiasm and outright acceptance of the unique position of Mr. Wyndham Lewis' genius in English art gave me a great satisfaction.


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I enclose two quotations for the cost of printing a small magazine. Kind regards to you and Mrs. Lewis,


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I very much enjoyed hearing your great work the Childremas (for a second time), last night. I look forward to hearing 'Monstre Gai'


Henley on Thames; Dear Mr. Lewis, I'm sorry I've been so elusive. Clarissa turned incendiary & burnt our large barn down which, what with Fireman insurance agents


Henley on Thames; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I should very much like to reproduce some of your works in the next number of Axin - if you like the idea


Henley on Thames; Dear Mr. Lewis, I send you page proofs of your article. The spaces indicated in your MSS have not been left on the galleys


Henley on Thames; Editing new art magazine will you contribute article of pictures pay high may I see you Wednesday or Thursday this week.


Henley on Thames; Delighted Wednesday 12 o'clock perfect.


Henley on Thames; Can you lunch Connaught Hotel Carlos Place Thursday 1 o'clock.


Henley on Thames; Delighted with article succumbed to universal cold writing many thanks


Henley on Thames; Dear Mr. Lewis, I'm delighted with the article and thank you very much indeed for your prompt response. I enclose a cheque from this 'Pavilion'


Henley on Thames; Dear Mr. Lewis, Thank you for your note; I am ashamed that I have not answered the previous one. We shall not appear until Sept. 1st.


Bangor, Wales; Many appalling delays owing to paper, printers, lithographer & everything . But the proofs of your article will not be long we doing


Henley on Thames; Can you possible post proofs to Woods Hertford Street today May I come next week.


Bridgend, Wales; Dear Sir. I made bolo to quote a few lines of your "Listener's" May 10th article in one of my last week's "Lift up Your Heart" broadcasts.


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, The interview with my partner regarding four - our book is over for a sudden access of nervous power and magnetism [Signed Marjorie Tripp]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, If you find the proofs at the Carfa you will, on looking through the plates [?] - [?] for the sake of pottery [Signed Marjorie Tripp]


London; Dear Sir, I return from the country this morning to find your two letters awaiting me. In reply to the first I may remind you that we are under no contract [Signed Marjorie Tripp]


London; Dear Sir, We wish to publish in the Evening Standard two articles on the question "WHO IS THE MORE USEFUL CITIZEN - THE BUSINESS MAN OR THE ARTIST? [Signed Stanley Tiquet]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Thank you very much for the article. As it stands at present it is on the long side, and I have made pencil rings round my suggested cuts. [Signed Anthony Winn]


London; With David Low's compliments.


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Would it be possible for me to come to see you? I very much want to do a profile of you describing your methods of working, [Signed Rudolf Klein]


London; Dear Mr. Giovanelli, If the British book rights in AMERICA AND COSMIC MAN by Wyndham Lewis are available might we see a copy [Signed F. V. Morley]


London; My dear Wyndham Lewis, I have thought most carefully over the suggestion that we should make another contract with you, but I don't see how this can be done. [Signed Douglas Jerrold]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Your quotes arrived & have been passed to the relevant department. I am glad that the advertisement for this weeks [Signed R.M.]


London; My dear Wyndham Lewis, Thanks for your letter of the 16th. Your fears are, however, quite groundless. We are advertising both in the "New Statesman" and the "Spectator" [Signed Douglas Jerrold]


London; My dear Wyndham Lewis, Dear Wyndham Lewis, My telegram was in answer to your question, and the answer, at the time I gave it, was perfectly correct. [Signed Douglas Jerrold]


London; My dear Wyndham Lewis, If I took your letter seriously I could only reach the conclusion that you had said a great many things to me [Signed Douglas Jerrold]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Mr. Oliver Brown showed me your "Inferno" and I should very much like to include it in the illustration of a book which Eyre & Spottiswoode[Signed Douglas Jerrold]


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Mr. and Mrs. Eliot have asked me to write to you and thank you most warmly for your letter. They were delighted to hear from you [Signed M. I. Drage]


London; Dear Sir, Mr. Eliot has asked me to inform you that owing to differences of opinion between the Proprietors on matters of policy [Signed I.P. Fassett]


London; Dear Wydham Lewis, Many thanks for letting us see Cassell's receipt. I think you should keep this yourself in case of any conceivable confusion [With mentioned receipt. Signed F. V. Morley]


London; Dear Lewis, I should have written before, for it happened that Eliot and I were both able to read the MS. of the beginning of SATIRE AND FICTION [Signed F. V. Morley]


London; Dear Lewis, The grand publicity should help to get a grad price for the Eliot portrait. I have been very eager to see it, but on my return from a long trip in America [Signed F. V. Morley]


London; Dear Lewis, Eliot passed MR> BULL to me for suggestions as to American publishers. I read it last week-end and enjoyed it very much. [Signed F. V. Morley]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I am enclosing herewith a form of agreement for the book which is being prepared dealing with your work. [Signed Peter F. du Sautoy]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, As you may be seeing Mr. Handley-Read to-morrow, I thought it quite possible that you might need to have the typescript [Signed Richard de la Mare]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I am now enclosing herewith a redraft of the agreement which I hope you will find satisfactory. If so will you kindly sign all copies [Signed Peter F. du Sautoy]


Brookly, NY; Dear Mr. Lewis, This is a request for a critical article for our new literary and arts magazine. It's to be quite small, but fine in every respect. [Signed Lorraine Rothbard]


Brookly, NY; Dear Mr. Lewis, We had written to you some time ago, in August; we assume the letter didn't reach you and we're sending a copy of it. [Signed Lorraine Rothbard]


New York; Pinker offered us Apes during my prolonged illness month before your book and letter came I read immediately my return tremendously enthusiatic


[n.p.] Dear Mr. Lewis, I remember the difficulties of your phone - particularly that if 2 should phone it would be from the country. So shall we leave it that I will not phone,


Allentown, Miss.; Dear Mr. Lewis, Since hearing from Mac(Luhan) that you were in St. Louis, I have looked forward to meeting you with all the more enthusiasm


St. Louis; Dear Mr. Lewis, Since it appears I am not to talk with you except in the presence of these women and your phone doesn't lend itself to conversation,


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis, Talking with you the other night was like waking after sleep, though that most reminds me of my own gapings and starings.


Toronto; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis: DOUGLAS M. DUNCAN ESTATE. With repect to your claim as the executor of the estate of the late Wyndham Lewis [Signed S. N. Lederman]


Toronto; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis: DOUGLAS M. DUNCAN ESTATE. The delay in replying to your letter of November 23, 1969 resulted from Mrs. Barwicks's [With listing of Lewis paintings paid for by Mr. Duncan. Signed F. D. Gibson]


London; [Invoice for title search; receipted as paid on May 25, 1897.]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, re Mrs. Lewis decd. Thanks for your note with cheque and also Bond signed by Mrs. Castell. Please let me have the Affidavit


Norwich; My dear Froanna, Just to wire our love with these flowers which I am hoping to get into the early post so that they will arrive fresh.


Norwich; Dear Mrs. Lewis. Willis & I are going to be in London next week, we should so like to see you if it would be convenient. Willis is going up on Tuesday


Norwich; My dear Mrs. Lewis, We are having a few days holiday & going to Sussex where Robert is at School at Ardingly, by way of London


Norwich; My dear Mrs. Lewis, Thank you for your kind invitation which I found waiting for us when we arrived home from Norwich Holiday, we shall love to come


Norwich; My dear Froanna, We were terribly shocked to hear the news on the wireless last night. We are going to give up decision this week-end


Norwich; My very dear Froanna, Thank you for your letter, I was going to write to you today - Do come on Monday if it suits you best but Billy is going to London


Norwich; My dear Froanna, When Willis came back from London he said you would like to come & stay with us at the end of June so I am writing to say


Norwish, My dear Froanna, I am just writing to say we do so hope you are coming to stay with us this summer. Elisabeth & her family had had the top floor


Norwich; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Thank you for your letter. I am glad you appreciated Aner, tho' sorry you say nothing disobliging. I am sure what you love to say in criticism


Norwich; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Betts and I did enjoy ourselves with you. We do appreciate good goof and drink, all the more because we so rarely move outside the Rectory


Norwich; Dear W.L. Best wishes for Easter to you both. I've got a box for hearing "Song" at the St. Martins' for you on Monday April 26th (evening).


Norwich; Dear W. L. Thank you for the P.O. I thought perhaps it was Rosemary who had frightened you from seeing me. Sorry to be such a doubter,


Norwich; Dear W.L. (Dear, not DLitt) You parted with some mumbled crack about my not coming to see you, Nasty (because I liked you).


Norwich; Dear W.L. Merebile dictu I was about to send you a card to say that I should be in town next Tuesday, for 3 days. Will ring you on arrival.


Norwich; Dear W.L. Excuse handwriting, the told typew is so impersonal, and I only use it for you so haven't got used to it. Will use it for any long effusions.


Norwich; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I shall be up next week, Mon to Thurs. Am most glad that (despite my reading) you like W.H. My complaint about his is


Norwich; Dear Wyndham Lewis, My plans are changed as my second daughter has suddenly got her holiday. I shall be up for three days next week,


Norwich; Dear W.. In middle of a Walter Carey [?] (whole Dea[?] involved)


Norwich; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Please forgive me (1) for giving such short notice & (2) for not suggesting a time. May I come at 10.15 am on Tuesday?


Norwich; Dear W.L. You have made me invest in this awful machine, and my poor wife has to hit it. I do not know what the result will be and I am very nervous


Norwich; Dear W.L. Sorry not to see you. The French Exhibition 1900-50 was most interesting as showing the French Choice. There were no surprises.


Norwich; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I'm writing to ask if you have fixed the date of your Exhibition? There is plan well ahead for a trip to London,


Norwich; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Do you want me for the opening? I suppose Monday May 2nd? Nuns, gurchurch! I like the 'other things' well enough;


Norwich; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Griffiths and I hope to come up to London on Monday might if that is alright. Let me know by return if earlier


Norwich; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I hope to come to London on Monday July 24th till the Friday afternoon. I should love to see you, but will understand if you are busy.


Norwich; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis & his wife. I should have liked to have one over the proofs of your book for you. I & my wife will be in town


Norwich; Dear W.L. Sorry not to see you last time. We had a good bus trip to Scotland. Glasgow was filthy, no book shops, all the people gossipping[sic], most Celtic.


Norwich; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Can I help by writing to S. Times or Observer, etc.? If so, you write your experience and advise the line.


Norwich; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Sorry to be so long in Reporting. Bumpus had your book, but couldn't say how it was going. At Cambridge Bowes had several


Norwich; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Would you car to do a drawing of me? I shall be in London from May 10th for a few days. I have most of your books


Norwich; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, You are most kind. I shall not be in the least offended if you change your mind heeding me. I shall be in London


Norwich; Dear W.L. (You should address me as "'Rev Sir'!) I found your exhibition at the Redfern in the Times just before I heard from you.


Norwich; Dear Maitre. I am sorry to worry you again when you are so busy. Griffiths' and my aim is to see both you and your exhibition of pictures.


Norwich; Dear W.L. Forgive me for not writing. I was sorry not to see you when in London. I hope to be up after Easter. I don't know wether I replied to your letter


Norwich; Dear W.L. Forgiveme humbly for not writing. Thank you for you Paschel greetings. The u\indisposition is behaving itself. I had hoped once in my life to play on wood


Norwich; Dear W.L. Well! So they are still spitting you up! I hope you are still using your Blunder Buss as a pepper-pot! Someone else has got grantchester.


Norwich; Dear W.L. How are you? We were most sorry you couldn't get down in May. However it was very cold, and the flowers and trees late.


Norwich; Dear W.L. Just a word or two to say you are always in my thoughts, and also that I hope to get to London again before Wimbledon;


Norwich; Dear W.L. It was good to see and hear you again. I don't know whe The modern poetry effect is due to my three fingered efforts: the bell rang.


Norwich; Dear W.L. Letter from your wife this a.m. saying she can come and see us at once for a bit. We are so glad she's coming, and hope the rest will do her good.


Norwich; Dear W.L. I hope to be in L. next Wed. to Fri. Will bring you a couple of doz New Laid Eggs. Don't feel you must see me. Will ring Thurs. Morn.


Norwich; Dear WL. I hope to be in London Next Mon. Dec.3. Will ring you Tues. Morn. if I hear no more. Was up in June for the tennis with Griffy,


Norwich; Dear W.L. Betts and I are coming to L. on Monday next. B. will be up M. and T. nights if you's like to see her. Will ring you Tues. morn.


Norwich; Dear W.L. So pleasedyou can all come to [Marching Song?] on Monday evening. See you in the Lounge 7.20. Love to come back to supper after


Norwich; Dear W.L. I have written to Lorna Backhouse and given her your address. The address of the tweeds is Mackenzie, 45. Arnol, Bragar, Stornoway, Isle of Lewis.


Norwich; Dear W.L. Well, well, well! I still think the first 70 pages of Chrildermass your best. We'll see when the others come out in print. Malign Fiesta was truly horrific.


Norwich; Dear W.L. Am coming up to see an old Bunuel film Mon._Thurs. Just letting you know in case you'd like to see me. Lorna down for week-end.


Norwich; Dear W.L. How are you? I've not been up since Dec. when I heard you were in hospital. We've survived the Lucky Jim Lock back in anger assault


Norwich; I'm in middle of R.P. What great and innocent fun! I gather you've been buying the best two Prefaces to Crochford's (2/6) and must have bought the whole


[London] Dear Lewis. I want you go to my show, I am sorry we never meet now, but I quite agree about your idea of writing on peach[?]


London; My Dear Lewis. If I can take your article about you right in the Listner as true and definite I'm terribly sorry. I hope it won't be as you say.


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, At the suggestion of Mr. D. Farr of the Take Gateway when I visited this morning in the course of my research work in the [?] Joyce


London; Dear Francis, Many thanks for your letter. I am not so schizophrenic now. The important point to remember is that the poetry should be published,


London; Dearest Francis, Yes of course Victor. I'm wondering if the fact that neither of us has heard from him since Christmas links up in any way with what Katie told me


London; My dear Francis, The "communication"? I mentioned that Katie sent me was an actual letter to her from Mr. Lewis. She, Mrs. L, wrote of "lying gossip",


London; Dearest Francis, I agree with all you wrote about Alick - to call her just "Typist" is - absurd. Yes, I'm pretty sure Holoroyd saw Freda Polock & Katie certainly,


London; Dearest Francis, Forgive me for not writing before to thank you for your letter about Ralph's death. You said just what I felt & that was a help.


London; My dear Francis, Thank you so much for your letter. I do hope Sylvia is getting better. Rita telephoned & said how glad she was to see you both.


London; My dear Francis, Unexpectedly I was shown a flat in the Barbican the day before yesterday - I expect because someone of influence in the city


London; Dearest Francis, How fascinating - B[?] Salkeld's account of Julian. It all links up. His [?] brother certainly died, & so Julian became his mother's pet,


London; Dearest Francis, Thank you so much for your note. Victor C. came here on Thursday. He was enraptured with his visit to you & Sylvia,


London; Dear Francis, The enclosed article of press is the best on the subject I have ever read. Let's hope your suggestions with me [?] be acted on!


London; Dear Francis & Sylvia, When I saw the notice in the Daily Telegraph a few hours ago. I thought how wonderful it was, Francis, for your aunt to die in your house,


London; The curtains have just arrived. Thank you very much indeed. I am delighted to have them & will take a pair to the celaners tomorrow, to get then derdict.


London; Thank you very much. I was going to telephone about the number of the ticket, but to have it itself is much better! I too look forward to the show.


London; Many thanks for your card saying you've written to the Cambridge. I do hope you have luck. I quite understand about 14th & have arranged with Roy for 24th.


Sussex; Many thanks for your card. I too, escaped for a bit of sea air, but there's no sun & it rains most of the time so I'll be glad to get back to Millbank tomorrow.


Siena, Italy. If only the Campo where I not wit had looked like this more often - there's been hardly any sun, just endless cold & wet - the worst Spring for ages the Italian papers say.


London; And very kind of you to send me that cutting. Let's hope the decisions are delayed for a 1 mo time---! Meant to ask Sylvia, when I rang her


London; Thank you so much for your card. I am sorry about your brother Gende?. How kind of you to send a list. I suppose I ought to go to Holland House,


London; Dearest Francis, Thank you for your card. I am very sorry you & Sylvian can't come next Thursday but perhaps its just as well, as I strained myself


London; Next Wednesday 24th will be just as good. I'll have dinner ready for 8.30. Much love to you both & so looking forward to seeing you -


London; My dear Francis,


London; Dearest Francis, How kind of you to send me that cutting. It fascinated me! There is a glimpse of Edward in it don't you think? She must be the grand-daughter


London; Easter Greetings! I hope you are both well? I hear, Francis, that you couldn't after all come to Rita's sisters welcome, & that you, Sylvia, weren't coming anyway,


London; Forgive this belated thanks for your note. I've no idea when I shall get to the Barbican as I'm not able to get a date for the flat I'd like (not finished yet).


London; Your kind letter arrived soon after I had posted my card to you both. (Slow, considering the stamp!) Thank you again. Much love,


London; Thank you both so very much - Sylvia for your card & Francis for letting me give him as a reference - no more news of the flat, so I'm hoping all will go well.


London; It was no discourtesy to send back the letter with no covering note, as it was sent to me in the same way. Perhaps because Katie has an idea


London; I am very distressed at the notice of [Hu?]'s death in today's TIMES. Please let me know if you have any details. I have a lovely card


London; This morning I heard that my references are beginning to be taken up, so it looks as if things are going all right. Do let me know when you hear -


London; Dearest Francis, On Friday I had a letter from the Barbican saying that my application for a flat had been accepted by the Committee


London; Dearest Francis, Many thanks for your letter. So Jean Preston (I thought Aurrey said she was Jean Charnley - the rich woman who was her friend


London; Dearest Francis, Again you don't tell me if the letters [?] in Holroyd's book came into your possession as Alick's executor! Victor Cassidy mentioned the book to me


London; Dearest Francis, Many thanks for sending Phienka's address so quickly. Martha McCulloch came here the day it arrived & she is writing to Phienka


London; My dear Francis, Torquay was wonderful as regards weather but Margaret is now so lame that she can only walk an inch or so forward, with difficulty


London; My dear Francis, Yesterday I ordered Hugh Ferguson's "Confessions", etc, as you suggested. I did this at the nearby Cripplegate Library.


London; My dear Francis, Many thanks for your letter. How interesting about Eileen Way & her lat husband. I hope to see her again but don't quite know how.


London; My dear Francis, First how is Sylvia? Gettingbetter still I hope! And you? Next, please, your advice. I've not yet got over the shock of what Kenneth Marshall has written


London; My dear Francis, How good of you to write so quickly. But I am so very sorry to hear Sylvia is weaker or so I take it - as she can't see visitors now.


London; Oh Francis how very kind & good you are. When I feel I can - this weekend I hope - I shall write to James Stern. Katie's niece Noelle - a former nurse -


London; This morning I had a card from my sister-in-law (Francis' sister) about a hotel newly opened in Hove, which has vacancies


London; Dearest Sylvia & Francis, That shoulder off lamb! I am so sorry it was overcooked. An excess of zeal:


London; Easter greetings & how I should like to see you both. I hope you are well? Jimmy Stern wrote the most charming letter


London; Dearest Sylvia, How very kind of you to ask us all to tea, &, I hope we shall come either 4th or 5th - I've written to Margaret


London; Dearest Sylvia, Thank you very much for copies with Loewis. It is such a relief to put it off but I ought not to have bothered you.


London; Are you going to the debate on Thursday? I should like to, but feel shy about going alone. I should like to hear Bernard


London; Dearest Sylvia, Forgive me for being so foolish as to be sure that I should have to join a party to see the [bakst?]


London; As you say it is sinful to charge 14/6 for such a far-back stall! Here it is - with many thanks. I look forward to seeing the show


London; Dearest Sylvia, Thank you so much for the delicious Christmas tea! I did enjoy it - & seeing you both again!


London; Dearest Sylvia, Forgive me for being so long in thanking you for your decorative letter-card, but I am only now


London; Dearest Sylvia, So glad to hear you are getting better. Please keep the enclosed obituary of Eve.


London; Dearest Sylvia, Delighted to hear from you. Yes, we must meet. If you & Francis could bear a cold supper


London; My dearest Sylvia, Your sweet letter & card for the R.S.2 came when I was away at Torquay, with Francis' sister.


London; Dearest Sylvia, How are you both? Not as exhausted as I feel I hope! Too much so to come to Hove for the day,


Glenisla, Scotland; This place is wonderful beyond description. We went to the Conservative fair at Guthrie Castle


London; Dearest Sylvia, Thank you so much for your card & note. I am very sorry you have been ill. What was it?


London; Dearest Sylvia & Francis, I was very glad to get your card & please forgive my long silence. Getting out of Millbank was a nightmare:


London; We arrived here from Simpton Dorf in the thunderstorm last night. When we were there we were only a few miles


London; My dearest Sylvia, I was so glad to get your letter but very sorry to hear how ill your mother has been


London; My dearest Sylvia, Thank you so much for the eggs. Three arrived unbroken &were simple delicious -


London; Dearest Sylvia, Thank you very much for your Christmas card. I sent more this year, & wrote no letters either.


London; Tried to ring Harold but couldn't get him, so I shall take it he is coming tomorrow & not ring you in the morning


London; I need 10 1/2 yards of material to line Alick's curtains, so, plus the making, they won't be at all cheap!


London; I forgot to tell you that Stevie came to see me at your house during the war. She seemed interested


London; I've now done all the postponing, so please ring when you come back, & we'll fix something then.


Northampton; A happy Easter & love from Margery. Any luck with the Dorset visit?


London; I saw a specialist yesterday & he told me my tonsils were the trouble. So he is taking them out at University College Hospital


London; Mrs. Peviskie gave me this card to send to you. She was so glad you liked Tanner, & hopes you will both come to tea


London; Thank you both so much. Francis for re-signing & you for your letter. I feel just the same about you dear Sylvia


Siena, Italy; I hope you are setting out today for your holiday with Louis in Dorset. It is wonderful here. I feel different already.


London; It is John Freeman interviewing on Sunday - as you probably have seen. Thank you again very much indeed for letting me come.


London; Dearest Sylvia, Very many thanks for your card, & for Francis' of this morning. Yes, I could well bear to see the Churchill play


London; If you would really care to go the "The Wings of a Dove" again, I would love to go with you, to a matinee.


London; I rang you this morning to let you know I've got someone else to "look in" for me, so please don't bother


London; This is to thank you again for your kindness & hope we shall meet soon. I've just finished washing up the things


London; I telephoned you & was put on the Brighton.... So you really are there! It was to tell you, that some time ago I heard


London; No news from Holland House, so I have just written to them saying I will take the 17 gns. room if they have no other,


London; Thank you so much for going to Holland House. I heard from them by the afternoon post just after I'd posted


London; Thank you again for your delicious lunch & for taking me to the theatre. I did enjoy our visit to Gwenol. too


London; You didn't miss much by not going to the RSL lecture! It was so dull, & not by the man I thought


London; Dearest Sylvia, How very kind of you to send me that paper - one I'd never heard of - because of the article on Lewis it contained.


Torquay, Devon; Here I am staying with Francis' sister. Her next guests have arrived from Hampshire to Hove, where they have taken a flat in Sackville Gardens


London; Dearest Sylvia, I hope you are quite well again now? or rather that you have been so for a long time? I miss being unable to ring you at Rosary Gardens


London; Dearest Sylvia, Thank you so much for your card of this morning. Yes, I think Rita is bringing me down on Monday. She rang on Sunday from a public box


London; I've just seen that the Westbourne House Hotel is in the list of the Hotels you kindly sent me - is it 2 years ago? Mrs. Dampier, the friend of Francis' sister,


London; Dearest Sylvia, Thank you & Francis for all your kindness to me on my otherwise disastrous holiday: I woke (from taking more sleeping stuff than I should have


London; So glad to get your note this morning & to hear you may be up on 22nd. Please come to dinner here that night? I'll cook a joint! Just let me know


London; DearSylvia & Francis, Many thanks for your letter. I've been given Ect. here. My condition is fine,/ but I don't know how long I'll be in.


Somerset; Dear Sylvia & Francis, Many thanks for your correspondence. As you probably know I was intending to hitch up to R. Smith tomorrow,


Somerset; Dear Sylvia and Francis, Many thanks for your letter, it has cheered me up considerably. (I am writing on my bed, so please excuse writing).


Somerset; My dear Sylvia and Francis, Champagne and good food! Richard seems to have been getting married for all the right reasons instead of


London; Another letter from Tim makes her idea of my meeting Rosamond with her seem inevitable ... If it transpires, then it will be all I can do in the day


London; Heard this morning that the meeting with Rosamond is off. I am not coming to Hove which is a relief. Will hope to see you both soon.


London; How are you both? Shall we all make the effort (?) to meet? I could come with a meal, now that things are comparatively easy here:


London; Dearest Sylvia, Many happy returns of the 5th & I hope we meet soon. The higher rented flats I believe I mentioned to you ( in St. John's wood) are no good,


London; Forgive me for not thanking you for your kind letter before: I did so enjoy sseeing you both & hope you will come again. I had an unexpected telephone call


Wiltshire; Dear Sylvia and Francis, I am sorry I have been a bit slow replying to your nice letter but I have been very tired


Wiltshire; Dear Sylvia and Francis, I was very sad to hear of poor Harold's passing. I am at a loss of what to say,


Wiltshire; Dear Sylvia and Francis, I believe a phone call was got through to you - anyway, the caused a real stink about it,


London; How are you both? I found a cutting about Dick which I sent on to Vincent Cassidy. Hope I didn't bother Francis


Leichester; Dear S. & F., Many thanx for your letters, & advice. I think, however, my experiences in the Tone Vales etc.


Somerset; Dear Sylvia & Francis, Many thanks for the letter, & cheque. I went into Bridgwater today to look


London; Dearest Sylvia, So glad to hear from you this morning. No, I haven't heard from Cassidy that he has a son:


London; My dearest Sylvia, Rita has just told me of the death of your other grandson. Now anything I could write seems


London; My dearest Sylvia, How glad I was to see your handwriting again & to hope I may see you both again soon.


London; Dearest Sylvia & Francis, How are you? I last heard of you from Gordon, who telephoned to say he & his friend Veronica


London; Dear Lewis, Was sorry that we were interrupted yesterday. I had a lot more to say. Lets meet after Friday -


London; Dear Lewis, I shall be absolutely delighted if you can do that drawing before Saturday because


London; Dear Lewis, You rang up at a bad moment as the lights had frized & an electrician was tinkering with them.


London; Dear Lewis, I saw some people yesterday afternoon who told me that Dick comforted Heather on Friday night


London; Dear Lewis, Was it you who rang up on Saturday? I don't know any other Mr. Lewis. I'm alone here tomorrow


London; Dear Lewis, The long letter idea isn't good. I no longer want to write that things are cheering up here.


London; Dear Lewis, You seem to be in great form these days. I hear amusing scraps of chit, especially one as regards you & Wilenski.


London; Dear Lewis, Has the enclosed gossip bit reached you? Evelyn always says how much he admires you.


London; Dear Lewis, After our conversation on Sunday I am magnificiently certain of what I am going to write.


Paris; Dear Lewis, I hope things go well with you. I am coming back on Saturday. All being well, I am seeing Putnam on Friday afternoon. .


London; Dear Lewis, So glad you can come tomorrow. Dinner is at a quarter to 8. Gerald M[?] are coming.


London; Dear Lewis, Will you come & dine here with Shist[?] and me on Wednesday or Thursday of next week.


Paris; Dear Lewis, What's all this about Robert's hit at you? I have just ordered "Dumb Animals" to see.


London; Dear Lewis, Will you come here one evening - Monday or Tuesday - & done? I'm not going away


London; Dear Lewis, Will you come & dine one evening next week? Any after Tuesday: I do hope you can.


London; Dear Lewis, Will you come $ have supper here on Sunday week? I say Sunday because Shickt is playing


London; Dear Lewis, I enjoyed seeingyou last Thursday very much. Heather was so late because Evelyn C. had been


London; Dear Lewis, Yes our evening with the girls is off because Olivia is going to New York in a few days


London; Dear Lewis, Let's meet after Christmas if you're still here & not too busy. I am going away on Tuesday


London; Dear Lewis, I sent my book to Friede on Tuesday - finished & after you'd left on Monday wrote him


London; Dear Lewis, Friede has got the manuscript - I heard last night. He says "We received your manuscript yesterday [With two postcards, one to Firminger from "Tony" and second to Firminger from "Evelyn".]


London; Dear Lewis, I have just bought "The Apes of God." I pawned some things to do it as I have no money at the moment.


London; Dear Lewis, This morning I had a most satisfactory answer to the "nice" letter I told of yesterday I wrote


London; Dear Lewis, Edward came here last night. He is most impressed with The Apes of God - thinks it extremely good


London; Dear Lewis, Very glad indeed to hear from you. What about meeting next Monday? You dine here


London; Dear Lewis, An inaccurate version of what I was told about you is written on page 227 (2nd part). I quoted


London; Dear Lewis, Please let me have my book back soon as I want that copy to cut & correct. If you will tell me


London; Dear Lewis, I'm leaving the book in the shop next door about 5 o'clock tomorrow. I've corrected it


London; Dear Lewis, Will you lend me a copy of The Apes of God? I want to read it very much If you can spare me one


London; Dear Lewis, I didn't like to say what I wanted to when you turned up yesterday because I was so frightened


London; Dear Lewis, Last night I heard from Friede. He says he's not yet got the novel you sent him & will I look into the matter


London; Dear Lewis, Just this post script to my last letter, & then I won't write again unless I have cit for you


Vauves; Dear Lewis, As I didn't get the pamphlet by the first post, I sent the letter I'd written to Zwemmer's telling them to send it


Paris; Dear Lewis, Thank you very much for the pamphlet which was sent on here this morning. Zwemmers arrived on Monday,


Paris; Dear Lewis, Everything about the book seems to be going well. They say they are printing it at once,


Vauves, France; Dear Lewis, My book will be out next week. I'll send you a copy directly I get one - Monday I think -


[n.p.]; Dear Lewis, This morning I had a letter from a man to whom I sent your pamphlet. I mentioned him to you -


Madrid; Dear Lewis, I was delighted to get your note from Berlin. I wrote comments on the efforvescent colonial remark,


Vauves, France; Dear Lewis, I am staying on another week, shall be back on 5th Jan. Edward sent me some money


London; Dear Lewis, I can't get any reply from your telephone so you ring me if you have time for a chat.


London; Dear Lewis, I once wrote to you that one day I'd write about you. It would have been mainly you attitude to me,


London; Dear Lewis, Vy chance I saw the Herald yesterday. I wish I had seen you next to Helen of Troy. Capitol!


London; [Invoice for March 9 re: "Apes of God"]


London; [Receipt for the invoice of June, 1954.]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Thank you for your letters of the 17th instant, with the enclosures, which have only reached me [Signed Kenneth Ewart]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I confirm that I received a telegram from you yesterday, reading :- [Signed Kenneth Ewart]


London; Dear Sirs, [RE]"Fillibusters in Barbary" Messrs. Soames Edwards & Jones have sent us a copy of their letter


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, We are hoping to obtain an Arts Council grant to make a film on the Vorticist group of artists [Signed Corinne Cantrill]


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I haven't heard from you since we met about 10 days ago, and I am a bit concerned [Signed Corinne Cantrill]


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Thanks for your letter and the post card - I am so sorry to hear that you have had an accident [Signed Corinne Cantrill]


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I do hope all is well with you, though as you had mentioned that you had had an accident [Signed Corinne Cantrill]


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, An American friend of yours whose name, unfortunately, I did not catch, has asked us to send you [Signed Anita Besson]


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I was very pleased to see from your letter to Miss Anita Besson that you liked our Ceri Richards catalogue [Signed Harry Fischer]


Boston; Dear Mr. Lewis, As a friend of Mr. Geoffrey Stone; a contributor to the late "Examiner", and lastly,


Glasgow; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I am enclosing a cheque for [pounds] 50,-- for your permission to repringt the "Imaginary Letters"


Glasgow; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I hope you received my letter and the accompaniying cheque in respect ot "The Imaginary Letters"


Glasgow; Dear Mrs. Lewis, We were very pleased to hear from Cy Fox that you were agreeable to the Sturge Moore Correspondence


Glasgow; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Thanks you for your letter which I delayed replying to until now as I had been awaiting word


New York; Dear Mr. Giovanelli, I was referred to you by Mr. Ezra Pound, who informs me that you are interested


New York; Dear Felix- Much delighted by Humphries devastating disclaimer. If Villa irks you might I suggest


New York; Dear Mrs. Lewis: We would like permission to quote from Wyndham Lewis' BLASTING AND BOMBARDIERING


London; Dear Sir, Our newspaper, published at Zurich (Switzerland) which is one of the leading Swiss dailies,


Basel; Dear Mr. Lewis, I send you a copy of "Die TAT" (31st Dec., 1949)


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, My father has returned to the office sooner than I expected, so could you call on Friday


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Hayward has handed me your letter of February 23. It is true that when we discussed the format


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Thank you for your letter of 9 September. With regard the "The Revenge for Love",


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I hope to write to you fully very soon on the subject of our last telephone conversation.


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Wednesday nest will be fine. I shall come at 5.30, as you suggest, and Desmond at about 7.30.


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Directly you are back, I wish you would come in to see me. There is a very important matter


Cambridge, Mass.; Dear Mrs. Lewis: For several years I have been working on the paintings of Gino Severini, one of the Italian Futurists,


Wiesbaden; My dear Missis Lewis, I think you will have your holy days now, but I hope this letter will follow you. [With typed transcription.]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Would you kindly send me in the M.S. of Leo Saltimbaugues at once, as I want it to go to the printers. [On English Review letterhead]


London; My dear Lewis; I am so sorry -- but Tuesday is the night of one of my wife's at homes -- which begin at 9.30,


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis: I received your letter of March 1, with considerable surprise and incredulity [Signed Phyllis Moir]


Rome; Dear Sir, I hoped that the British Coucil Library would provide me with some concise book on Colour Theory - instead I cam across


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, If I reclaim and send to you my copy of BLAST, will you kindly remit two shillings


Milan; Dear Lady, We take the liberty of asking you kind permission to photograph and reproduce the painting "Red Scene" [Signed Elona Tavans]


Milan; Dear Madam, It is our intention to photograph and to reproduce in our publication "Arte Moderne", published in Italy [Signed Anna Cazzaniga]


Milan; [13 letters from January 2, 1968 to April 1, 1969 mainly signed by Anna Cazzaniga about publishing Lewis paintings.]


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, I have recently come across one of your husband's novels "Snooty Baronet",


Knightsbridge; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, I am terribly sorry about the delay in getting John Reid's book to you,


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I have just read the last part of your your book "The Winter and the Absolute"


Torquay; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you for your letter and for kind invitation to tea. Unfortunately, I have


Torquay; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, It was very nice talking to you - I'm the one who "shadowed" you recently,


London; My dear Lewis, Do come Thursday afternoon almost any time. I suggest the 3.45 Waterloo wh. gets in for tea.


Guildford; Dear Mr. Lewis, Will you come to a meeting to settle the nature of the group of artists which Duncan Grant,


Guildford; My dear Lewis, The things are back from Cardiff - no sales alas. They are at Chemies and he wants to unload them


London; My dear Lewis, I quite meant to get to those drawings but Saturday is a bad day for me, and I'm terribly busy.


London; Dear Lewis, I find this afternoon in packing up here to go away the letter from Mr. Rutter of which you spoke.


Guildford; My dear Lewis. I have just finished Leon Bloy's Mendiant Ingrat which you recommended to me I am simply overwhelmed [With typed transcription.]


Bradford, Yorkshire; Dear Sir. I am seeking permission from authors and ublishers to print material which I have chosen for an anthology


Bradford, Yorkshire; Dear Mr. Lewis, Thank you for your permission to se the extracts from 'One-Way Song' in 'Modern Satirical Verse'.


Bradford, Yorkshire; Dear Mr. Lewis, Thank you for your letter about the fee for the use of the extracts in my anthology.


Sussex; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Following a suggestion by the B.B.C. I am writing to enquire if you are agreeable


Sussex; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you for your kind letter agreeing to the use of a recording by Mr. Wyndham Lewis


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, The enclosed invitation may call for a word or two of explanation. Some of those whose names appear


London; Dear Madam, I hope you will pardon me, a stranger, for approaching you on the following matter.


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, I am engaged on a book which will deal with the changing taste of the thirties in the arts,


Holborn; Dear Lewis, As I have heard no nwews of you I imagine you must either still be away or have been away.


Penybont; Dear Lewis, When I saw Richword the other day I said that should I write to you I would remind you


Penybont; My dear Lewis, Not hearing from you I went up to London informed by the few silly items of news that B.B.C. dribbled


near St. Ives; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I opened this by mistake when I got back here: it was among a number of letters


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, You must excuse me for not having written before: I shall get the article done very soon now.


near St. Ives; Dear Lewis, I send you back The childermass, on whose pages no eye but mine has looked, and with it


London; Dear Lewis, Our journeys keep us apart. Your letter waited for me while I was in Ireland, otherwise I should have replied before.


near St. Ives; Dear Lewis, I have been invited to dinner near Whiteleys (Inverness Terrace) on Wednesday & have accepted


Toronto; Dear Mr. lewis, I don't know whether you will remember me very distinctly, but I was so sorry not to have seen you again


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I hope you won't think this request inpertinent- Have you got any copies of the Ideal Giant,


London; My dear Lewis, Many thanks for your welcome note of December 27 - unanswered previously because as you will see


London; My dear Lewis, How are things with you? I thought I would drop you a line in the hope that we micht meet one day


Kingsley; My dear Lewis, Could we meet again some time? T.W. Earp, Cecil Gray, Contant Lambert, I, have all talked,


Kingsley; My dear Lewis, There is a little Greek restaurant in Dean Street which I think might suit us. What if we were to meet


Kingsley; Dear Lewis, Hope this reaches you in reasonable time. Yes, Frascati's in Oxford Street would do perfectly as well


Kingsley; Dear Lewis, Sorry you had the bother of telegraphing but it was clearly better to meet when the weather becomes


Kingsley; My dear Lewis, It was a pleasure to get your letter - I am very glad that you were able to go to the show at Walker's


Kingsley; Dear Lewis, Thanks for letter: how would Tuesday next (Feb.10) suit you: 12: Frascati?


Kingsley; Dear Lewis, Yes, let us wait a little now until the snow and ice recede again. When they do - and by the prohets


[St. Louis] My dear Mr. Lewis: I call at wrong hours, and therefore miss you. Because of my eagerness to come to the studie


[St. Louis] My dear Mr. Lewis: Full well do I know that this is by no means "payment in full" for the "drawing" - I have no means of meeting that,


London; Dear Mr. Lewis: Will you by chance remember that while you were in St. Louis long ago, you knew me, along with many others.


Dolton, Ill.;Dear Mrs. Lewis: Having been for some time an admirer of your husband's work, I am now doing a doctoral thesis on his writings,


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Herewith your typescript back again. I was most interested to read it, but I fear it is a little too learned, [Signed Archibald Lyall]


[n.p.] ...d'une intelligence artistique sasez clairvoyante pour cacer au spectateur les echafaudages savants de ses tableaux. [page 5]


Madrid; Dear Mr. Lewis, I have just read - rather belatedly perhaps, but nevertheless with great interest, not to say enthusiasm


Beverly Hills; Dear Wyndham Lewis: I very recently had the pleasure of reading a brief outline of your new book, ROTTING HILL. [Signed William Herndon]


Surrey; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I was very sorry to hear that your husband had died. Please accept my sincere sympathy;


London; My dear Lewis, We must certainly meet again soon. I am at present free for lunch any day next week.


Geneva; My dear Wyndham Lewis, Very many thanks for your letter. The information will be very useful in the biographical section


Geneva; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Your letter has only just caught me up; I have been on the move, and am writing this from Geneva...


Geneva; Dear Lewis, I hope you won't mind my troubling you with a request for some information which, perhaps, you alone can give.


Paris; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Your letter brought good news. It will be delightful to see you again after all these years.


Paris; My dear Wyndham Lewis, I was about to send you the usual Christmas greetings a few days ago - but have deferred writing


Cambridge; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Marshall McLuhan had written me that you are not unwilling to meet me. I shall be in London on Friday


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham-Lewis, I have been thinking about you a great deal since our rather hectic interveiw yesterday.


[n.p.] Mrs. Lewis, Here's a poor photo copy I made of the dust wrapper plan for "Enemy Salvoes". The big Enemy figure


[n.p.] Mrs. Lewis: Here's an abstract written by Sheila Watson of her university thesis on Lewis. The abstract appeared


[n.p.] Mrs. Lewis: I took the two pictures to the framers and the work on them is now going forward. Also, you'll find included


[n.p.] ... contact with the world - a necessity if one's living alone, I find. Please let me know about this. It would be no trouble


[n.p.] Mrs. Lewis: Greetings & best wishes for Christmas & the New Year! [Christmas card]


[n.p.] Mrs. Lewis: Here's a photograph of me with Robert Chapman's baby son, Tom. Tom doesn't seem to happy on my knee!


[n.p.] Mrs. Lewis: Here's [pounds] 25 in postal orders to cover your return ticket to London & incidental travel expenses.


[n.p.] Mrs. Lewis: Here's the book on the Indians by Marshall McLuhan's remarkable daughter!


[n.p.] Here's the AP's story on Gawsworth as it appeared on the news wire - [with typed half sheet of news wire, torn into two pieces with Fox's note at top.]


London; Mrs. Lewis: Here's the photo of WL & Mr. Tut, enlarged by the technicians on Fleet Street. It looks great!


[n.p.] Start of WL's introduction to either the catalogue for ca Ayrton show or Ayrton's book, "Golden Sections"


Montreal; Am due to be trasferred to London August 13. Have been watching impatiently for review of B & B, but so far


New York; Dear Mrs. L., What a man this Wyndham was! I have a shelful of his books - I have everything he ever wrote,


[n.p.]Afraid my luck re transportation from Gt. Baddow has failed. Waited about 20 minutes for bus outside Blue Lion tonight,


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Attached is the Basil Taylor piece on Vorticism, from The Listener, and also an oituary from The Times


[n.p.] Mrs. Lewis: The Penguin chief's name is: Christopher Dolly, Managing-director, Penguin Books, Bath Road, Harmondworth, [Attached is Penguin listing including a Lewis book]


London; Mrs. Lewis: Thought you might want to see more of the Churchill serialization. Walter advises that Funk and Wagnall


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Many thanks for letting me see 20th Century Palette. I stayed up till 4 a.m. that night finishing it.


[n.p.] Mrs. Lewis: I barged in on White today, bearing a copy of the Canadian Literature special issue. He seemed not to have heard


London; Mrs. Lewis: Thank you for your letter & its confirmation that you are indeed "alive & well"! I'm writing you a letter


Montreal; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I am glad to know what Darleks are, and that an object of your dislike is that Post Office Tower.


Montreal; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Attached is Hugh Kenner's tribute to T.S. Eliot, from the American magazine "National Review".


Montreal; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Many thanks for your latest letter. Re Your question about Kenner's essay on "The Trial Of Man":


Montreal; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Again, thanks for the permission regarding the wonderful essay on Canadian artists and nature.


Montreal; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I've sent the rather battered copy I had of the Trial of Man excerpt* to Mr. Calder.


[Montreal]; Mrs. Lewis: Here's an article on McLuhan from the big American magazine "Newsweek." It contains the first mention


Montreal; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I've just received your last letter, with its account of your somewhat stark situation.


[London] Dear Mrs. Lewis: No answer from White, even though I sent a postcard to him at his country place [Article on David Garnett from the "Observer" included.]


Montreal; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Many thanks for your letter of March 6. I found I had on hand here a complete copy,


Montreal; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I hope you received my wired thanks for the Listener articles. It was wonderful to see those


Montreal; Dear Mrs. Lewis, This time, a million thanks for letting me see these suberb articles. I've spent the whole night revelling


Montreal; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I have received the self-portrait which is just wonderful. Walter Michel's sister got it to me


Montreal; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Back on my feet once more after a bout of 'flu--throuwn off with the aid of much juice,


Montreal; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I see that Michael Ayrton has been firing a few counterblasts at Melville in the New Statesman. This is all to the good.


Montreal; DearMrs. Lewis, Enclosed please find $100 (Canadian)* or the equivalent in sterling. It isn't much, considering


Cairo; Would that the author of "Filibusters in Barbary" had gotten to modern Cairo! I've had a good look at it this time,


Tel Aviv; Mrs. Lewis: Sun here brilliant, spirit seemingly unperturbed. A young, booming country, to all appearances. Shalom!


Tel Aviv; Mrs. Lewis: Here's the cyclopic mastermind behind things military here. I'm returning to London today,


Montreal; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I've been back here an unconscionable long time before finally sitting down to tap out my thanks


[Washington] Dear Mrs. Lewis, The "New American" anthology of wh now is due out in October. I've been accepted by Reuter


London; Mrs. Lewis: I've been trying to get you on the phone- but no luck. Have you changed your number? All best.


Cardiff; Mrs. Lewis- They have a quite terrific collection of Impressionist pictures at the Museum here. But a marvellous Derain portrait


Montreal; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I expect to be over some time in September. Immigration papers now are being sought, and this,


London; Mrs. Lewis: Many thanks for your telegram and letter. As you suggest, digs-hunting in London is the worst


London; Mrs. Lewis: Many thanks for your letter. I'm glad you found the "Lawman" a pleasant guy! I'll try to fix the 'phone


[n.p.] Mrs. Lewis: AP did a quick job I also have a negative of the photo copy they made. I phoned London Magazine & gave them the lowdown


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Attached is the review of the reprinted Aldington book. I think it's interesting that a vunversity pres[s]


[n.p.]; Mrs. Lewis: See pp. 132-157 for Graves' attack on Yeats & Pound. Thanks for your cake. We had another office feed


Lonodon; Mrs. Lewis: I returned today (Saturday) to that bookshop where I'd seen the remaindered :Revenge for Love"


Montreal; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I took the liberty of asking Mr. Walter Michel for your address so that I could send you the attached,


Cairo; Greetings from Cairo.


Montreal; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Many thanks for your letter. I was in London last summer and remember being dazzled by Bagdad


London; Dear Mrs. lewis: I'm sorry for the delay in getting the book on Cocteau to you. I'm trying to get it on some sort of reduced-price


[n.p.] Mrs. Lewis: What better way to wish on you the Season's best than with a modest momento of Hogarth,


[n.p.] Dear Mrs. Lewis: Don't expect I'll be able to make it out to Gt Baddow this weekend but should be out next Saturday,


Montreal; Mrs. Lewis, I enclose three postal orders as payment for the Cubist Self-Portrait you speak of. I'm making the postal money-orders


Montreal; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I've just returned from Toronto where I saw the exhibition of Wyndham Lewis pictures


Montreal; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Kenner's 'Gnomon" was sent to you today (Tuesday).


Montreal; Forgot the thank you for the Listeners you write of sending. I look forward to receiving them tremendously


Montreal; Listener articles arrived safely thousand thanks.


Montreal; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Just a note to say (if I didn't before) that I suggested to Mr. Calder that he should arrange to check


[n.p.] Ma[n]y thanks latest package revelling in wonderful Lewis treats.


Montreal; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Walter writes, telling me you want the manuscripts, proofs, etc., you sent, returned. I am sending them off


Montreal; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I've just sent you air-mail all but the Listener proof sheets, which I'm having something of a time


Montreal; Dear Mrs. Lewis, In perhaps crude reproduction, here's Pound by Lewis, a far better medium for holiday wishes


Hope sevenish ok tonight.


Montreal; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Are you still at the old address or have you moved? Hope this reaches you, wherever you are,


Quebec; Greetings from Canada agin. I've had no word from my London job hope, but I suppose they should be given time to mull things over!


Montreal; My emigation to H. Wilson's Britain still delayed - big crackdown on colonials going on. Nfld. newspaper wants article


Montreal; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Could you mail me your new address? Sorry to hear of the heatlessness of the Highgate establishment.


Montreal; Dear Mrs. Lewis, The classic self-portrait of WL continues to glow on the wall here and Lewis's books


Montreal; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I air-mailed you a copy of the Soldier of Humor anthology today (Wednesday). Should reach you by Monday


[[n.p.] Mrs. Lewis: Here's the Listener photo of, & interview with, Fr. D'Arcy. I phoned Methuen today in my capacity as reporter


Fredericton, N.B.; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Had to call off planned British visit in order to visit a sister on Gaspe Peninsula,


Montreal; Great men sometimes discovered in weird ways by crown current Sunday Times Magazine Augurs well despite inevitable grotesqueries.


Montreal; Mrs. Lewis: I've been sending cards & telegrams to you in "Great Baslow," because that's the name of the town


Montreal; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Many thanks for your rousing letter. Your new spot sounds quite congenial. Nothing like being able


[New Bruswick?] Dear Mrs. Lewis, Many thanks for the permission. In the projected piece, I plan to make mention of Malcolm Lowry too,


New York; En route back to Montreal after seeing the Michels. Walter busy on big WL book & making terrific progress.


Montreal; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I've been down to see the Michels, both of whom seem physically hunky-dory now.


Quebec; Back in Montreal after a smooth flight on the plane pictured here. Left London at 12 noon local time, arrived Montreal 1 p.m.


Great Baddon; Here's a little note on G. Woodcock from the Canadian Maclean's Magazine. He now seems a confirmed WL [Written on clipping about George Woodcock; with TL[copy] to "Hugh" from Fox, May 19, 1967.]


Quebec; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Just saw your great letter to New Statesman! You really smashed Melville with your burst of biographical truth.


Montreal; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I understand "Blasting & Bombadiering" appears June 22, & I write to wish it best of luck.


Montreal; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Here's the relevant pages of the Blackwell catalogue listing Mr. Tomlin's anthology of Lewis [With the mentioned pages.]


London; Now transferred to above address. Out searching for digs -a highly disappointing business. Have a big chunk of Michel's book


[Misdated, refiled within box 106.]


Notting Hill; Rot drove me from latest digs hunting again.


London; Am being put up by a McLuhan fan after having to leave the Maida Vale premises by reason of the stench of rot there!


London; Just to reassure you - I won't be barging in on you this Saturday or Sunday. I'm moving int. the new cad, hopefully, permanent, digs.


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: I hope it will be ok if I drip in on you Saturday afternoon or evening. I have Walter Michel's MS I want to show you


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: I rang Hutchinson's today & they said they have no plans for any reprint of Rude Assignment.


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: I've been working every night this past week & now have to spend Saturday morning interview


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Am still planning to get out to see you Sunday. I reang the London Magazine today


London; I sent a print of the WL photo to Walter & gave another one to a chap named Murdoch at the Mayor Gallery.


London; Wow! What a wind! Hope you weren't blown away. Your dorr plugs proved invaluable at my windswept place.


London; Just talked with Williams, who said he'd received a letter from you. I took the liberty of telling him about "The Do-Nothing Mode"


London; Mrs. Lewis: I expect to barge in on you in mid- or late - afteroon Saturday if that's OK.


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Attached is a Christies catalogue for the Nov. 3 sale. The Lewis picture involved is the portrait


London; Mrs. Lewis: I won't be barging in on you this weekend. Things have become a fiasco at my office.


London; Mrs. Lewis: I understand that the materials you gave me are still getting the close attention of Alan Ross & others


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Talked to Julian Symons on the phone today. He sounded delighted about your favoring the idea


Paris; Much has changed. Far heavier traffic, for example. But WL's city of light still glows - the great genius of the place remains,


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Back from Paris Friday & busy since then doing stories on the subject for Canada. Hope to visit you


London; Mrs. Lewis: Just heard from Walter again. He speaks now of publishers "nibbling" at the anthology & his own book,


London; Happy New Year, presuming you're back by this time. Will you be around this coming Saturday or Sunday?


London; Mrs. Lewis: I find that Mr. godwin, formerly of Penguin Books, now works with the publishing firm of Weidenfeld & Nicolson.


London; Mrs. Lewis: That institute extablishment finally found the record of WL reading his BBC "crisis" talk. It's superb!


London; Your "Canadian Literature" account of the Tudor fire was terrific! I finally got hold of the Lewis issue, just out.


London; Sorry indeed to hear of your illness. A 1932 self-portrait of WL is among "new acquisitions" now on display


London; Sad anniversary but Lewis name and achievement live on.


London; Mrs. Lewis: Hope you've recovered from the bronchial business, which sounds awful. Cornell sent me after I asked for it,


London; This is the lovely picture attacked at National last week. I took the liberty of showing "Do-Nothing Mode" to a


London; Just returned Belgium mialing article to you which magazine returning


London; Staff report that WL's "A Battery Shelled" escaped any damage during Sunday's fire at the Imperial War Museum.


[London] Dear Mrs. Lewis: Here is Mr. Allen's Times obituary of W. K. Rose in case you hadn't seen it. It was the first I knew [With mentioned clipping.]


London; Time magazines book section is asking urgently for permission to reproduce drawing by Wyndham Lewis of Ezra Pound


London; Mrs. Lewis: I'm being transferred to Paris for several months, as of a fortnight or so from now. The anthology of WL on art


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Here's Snooty Baronet - a rather battered extra copy which was among my other books by WL.


Paris; Mrs. Lewis: Greetings from France, where I've now started working. Hope your weather has been better than the cold


Paris; Mrs. Lewis: Above is where I'll be living for next 2 months or so. People in Paris say the city has greatly changed


Paris; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Many thanks for sending your new address. I imagine it must be lovely country around Torquay


Paris; This about the Luxembourg from "Tarr": "But perhaps although he possessed the Luxembourg Gardens so completely,


Paris; Mrs. Lewis: Hope you're well on your way to getting settled in at your new address. Correcting of galley proofs


Paris; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Many thanks for your letter from Torquay. It must be glorious down that way now & I hope the new flat


[Paris] Dear Mrs. Lewis: I'm still in Paris but hope shortly to be back in England, as per above address. I've just reached the end of my tether


Paris; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I'm back here now after what proved to be a temporary spell in London, at the organization's bureau there,


Paris; Mrs. Lewis: I'll be moving back to England shortly, & the above, for the time being, would be my address.


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Many thanks for your letter of Oct. 4. I got back to London alright but then had to find a flat.


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Many thanks for your newsy letter. It is great to hear about the French translations and the special issue


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Thank you for your latest. I'll see that you get a copy of "Counterblast". I've been ordered off


Rome; Greetings from Rome, where we stopped en route to Tehran.


London; Mrs. Lewis: McLuhan's "Counterblast" won't now be out till February, but the publishers will be sending you a copy then.


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: I enclose two more clippings on the Vorticist show--one from the Paris Herals-Tribune, with Wykes-Joyce,


[London] And with ever confidence that 1970 will be a year fo new gains, for the cause of WL! [Christmas card]


London; Mrs. Lewis: I hear the new chairman of Methuen is Peter Wait, whoever his is. In case they ever prove useful,


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Thank you for your striking Christmas card and your letter. And by the way I must have given you the wrong


Paris; All best from Paris, where I'm spending 3 days around Christmas.


London; Mrs. Lewis: I'll be sending you the English edition of WL on Art as soon as th [?] go-slow relents the address


London; Mrs. Lewis: Thank you for your latest letter. I thought the "Agenda" was an excellent effort indeed. [Pasted on card is a clipping reviewing the WL special issue.]


London;; Mrs. Lewis: Re the visit this weekend: I should be popping along early Saturday afternoon. Will phone your Torquay station.


London; Mrs. Lewis: Barring a sudden transfer on an out-of-town assignment (& I see that Belfast may be erupting again),


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Here is a preliminary draft of the article on WL and yourself in Toronto. As you see,


London; Mrs. Lewis: Many thanks for your comments on the Lewis-in-Toronto piece. They are invaluable as a way of keeping


London; Mrs. Lewis: I got my article re the Toronto years off on Tuesday to the Canadian magazine which wanted it.


London; Mrs. Lewis: I've just had a guick look at Walter Michel's catalogue of WL's art & the plan of reproductions.


London; Mrs. Lewis: I'm heading for Germany & a week's holiday in Munich, etc. Here's wishing you a Happy Easter


Munich; Mrs. Lewis: Very cold & snowy down here these days. But the art & the beer are enough to keep anyone warm


Frankfurt; En route back to London, I stopped for 2 days in Frankfurt. The cathedral here, like so much else of the old city,


Misfiled and refiled in box 106, folder 101.5


London; Mrs. Lewis: I think this card is a great publicity boon for WL. At least, I'm working now on my second two dozen,


London; Mrs. Lewis: How much more galvanizing then this is the WL self-portrait!


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: I've written Walter about the WL self-portrait you have, asking him whether he has it in his catalogue.


London; Mrs. Lewis: Many thanks for the terrific rending of the WL self-portrait! Themes & Hudson now are trying to determine


London; Mrs. Lewis: A lovely show of Pictures by a consummate master, of which the one reproduced here is typical.


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Thank you for your latest letter. I'm sorry you haven't heard from Toronto about the pictures there.


London; Mrs. Lewis: I don't have to go to Belfast after all & then can come down your way this weekend.


London; Mrs. Lewis: I've checked the typewriter situation here and find that a re-conditioned portable costs


Cambridge; Mrs. Lewis: In Cambridge for the day. I guess you can quickly spot WL's 1949 portrait of Eliot on the right


Lewes; Mrs. Lewis: There's only one artist who is comparable to this painter of animal life* -- and that's the WL


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Thank you again for your letter. I'm distressed to hear that your phone was disconnected


London; Mrs. Lewis: Just back from a foray to Dulwich, of all places. There I found a fine gallery at the College -


London; Mrs. Lewis: I heard from Bernard Lafourcade today & am now trying to arrange rendezvous with him


London; Mrs. Lewis: I got together with Bernard Lafourcade & his wife, whom I found to be extremely likeable pelple indeed!


Paris; Mrs. Lewis: Bernard Lafourcade gave me a ride to Paris in his car, & it turned out to be an excellent trip


West Berlin; Mrs. Lewis: The art has begun to flow back into Berlin. I'm having fine weather, good food & beer, but the damnable airlines


Brugge; Greetings from Bruges, another stop on my somewhat truncated holiday itinerary. It's raining cats & dogs here


Dusseldorf; Greetings from this quite vast Rhine town, full of money, beer & art!


Hamburg; Greetings from a vast port city, where the art is as abundant as the boats & beer! A terrific place, with a slight whiff


London; Mrs. Lewis: I'm back in London after the holiday. While in Hamburg, I phoned Merlin Verlag about the German edition


London; Mrs. Lewis: I've found a shop selling Smith-Corona portable typewriters selling for about [pounds] 15 (new).


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: I'm sending you today, under separate wrapping, the memoirs of the war written by Northcliffe's neice,


London; Mrs. Lewis: I checked Methuen's sales department today & they say that neither "Revenge for Love"


London; Mrs. Lewis: Thank you for your letters & for the enclosure. Also for D. G. Bridson's address. The book by him


London; Mrs. Lewis: In line with my plan for visiting you this coming weekend instead of the past weekend,


London; Advertisements for "Tarr" have started in France. And Lawrence Durrell has published an essay in Figaro Litteraire


London; Mrs. Lewis: I took your picture in today for framing, which will take the usual time of 2-3 weeks. I also popped a note


London; Mrs. Lewis: I've just been hit by a [?] of very stiff tax demand & have had to cancel my planned holiday trip


London; Mrs. Lewis: I hope to get down with your picture Saturday & also will bring a typewriter if I can carry both


London; Mrs. Lewis: Despite what then was the continuing railway "go-slow," I sent you today by parcel-post the English edition


London; Mrs. Lewis: I've just posted to you a photocopy (a rather poor photocopy, for which I apolgize) of Michael Ayrton's


Freiburg; Greetings from this lovely Black Forest town. I'm here at the start of a one-week holiday. Just before I left London


Oslo, Norway; Mrs. Lewis: Just back from the Arctic Circle, where there's still much snow around & the Midnight Sun is


Stuttgart; Mrs. Lewis: I think you get the Daily Telegraph & thus will have seen the review in the May 6 issue of the WL books.


London; Mrs. Lewis: As you will have gathered if you received the "New York Review of Books", I'm now back from Germany.


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Here's another example of the increasing attention now being paid to WL's work as painter


London; Mrs. Lewis: Thank you for your letter. I rang the typewriter repair people. They said * they've been waiting for a part


London; Mrs. Lewis: Glad to hear your typewriters were finally returned! Barring complications, I'll be coming down your way


London; Mrs. Lewis: Slight change of plan for Sturday: Due to overcrowding on later trains, I'm having to catch the train


London; Refiled later.


London; Mrs. Lewis: Just heard from Walter that, at last, reviews are beginning to appear in the U.S. about the big WL book.


London; Mrs. Lewis: Back in London after eventful trip to ugly but somehow profoundly engaging Belfast & Londonerry. [Written on Aug.8, 1971 letter to C.J. Fox by Denis Williams, (a WL connection).]


London; E. W. F. Tomlin's address is Tall Trees, Morwenstow, CORNWALL. WL's "Ezra Pound", "Barcelona" & "La Suerta" are on view


London; Mrs. Lewis: You may already have heard but Walter's big book on WL has had almost a 2-column review in the U.S.


Colmar, France; This madonna is one of the gems of Colmar, which also has the great Greenewald crucifixion altarpiece series.


London; Mrs. Lewis: Fresh back from France. Thank you for your letter. I've now received a copy [?] very gratifying


London; Mrs. Lewis: I guess you've heard the news from Walter Michel that he's had to cancel his trip to England...


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Attached is the piece I did for "The Antigonish Review" in Nova Scotia on David Jones,


London; Mrs. Lewis: The "Unlucky for Pringle" book has now come through the printers & we are busy reading the proofs. [Written on proof sheet with review of the book.]


London; [Misfiled; filed with 63]


London; Mrs. Lewis: Here's a copy of the letter I mailed Feb.13 to Cullen at Methuen. I'll let you know of his reaction [With TL[copy] of Feb.13 letter to John Cullen at Methuen & Co. publishers.]


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: I attach a copy of the letter I received today from Mr. Cullen.


[Misfiled; refiled at end of box.]


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: What a terrifically co-operative crew they are at Cornell! I've just received a letter from one of their librarians,


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Thank you for the cheque for [pounds] 1.25 which I received last night. I attach here the draft contract


London; Am back from Bonn. Tired out but delighted to receive letter from Peter Owen, the publisher. He's interested in the idea


London; Mrs. Lewis: I hope you got back home safe & sound last Saturday. Work has since been going forward on the book


London; Mrs. Lewis: A final sprint of work has enabled us to complete the work on the volume of stories. Now only Calder remains


London; Mrs. Lewis: I'm due to see the publisher Moore about the book of stories, Monday Aug. 7. I'll let you know the outcome


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: I finally heard from Peter Owen on the subject of the idea for a "Wyndham Lewis on Literature."


London; [Misfiled; refiled at end of box.]


Darmstadt; Greetings from Darmstadt. If I can continue to grope my way successfully through beer, schnitzel & pictures,


Mrs. Lewis: All that can be done now is to wait till May, with fingers crossed! Southam (the series editor) seems all for the book, [Written on TLS to Fox from Southam.]


Brussels; Mrs. Lewis: Remember WL's summing up (in "Rude Assignment", I think) of Napoleon? - "a highly successful little Corsican gangster"


[Brussels?] Mrs. Lewis: I sent Mr. Baker a telegram first, to advise him that I was writing him your address! [Written on TLS to Fox from Baker; with clipping included.]


Brussels; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Further to my phone call from here Sunday night, here is the file of letters sent to me in photocopy form by Ross Baker, [With 4 letters montioned, all dealing with "Self Condemned".]


London; Mrs. Lewis: I'm still a bit groggy from the ful but think I'll be able to make it to & from Torquay, probably Saturday.


Brussels; Mrs. Lewis: I'm being transferred from here in Brussels back to London April 5, for 6 months! I hope to get down to see you


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: I'm sory for being out of touch for so long. But sending you the attached clipping about Michael Ayrton


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Thank you very much for your card, whish is a terrific period piece! I guess that by now you've heard


London; Many thanks for your letter! The "Lewis on Literature" book has now reached the point where all the material has been collected


London; [Clipping taped onto postcard announcing marriage of Prof. E.W.F. Tomlin and Miss J. Miller.]


London; Mrs. Lewis: Many thanks for all the material & help for the book which you passed along on Saturday. I'll return the books


London; Mrs. Lewis: Apparently I successful in applying to the job at Reuters - the new job to replace the one I soon will leave.


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Excuse the stationery - I am typing this on the job. Good news--the proofs of ENEMY E SALVOES are due


[South Kensington?] Mrs. Lewis: My new address is 30 Courtfield Road, London, S.W.7 Phone: 370-2943. The first (of two) volumes


London; There appears to be no branch of the Consures' Association in your area. Nor can I find Mr. Everett's address or phone number


[n.p.] Mrs. Lewis: Bridson's phone number is: 01-340-0293. It looks as if "Enemy Salvoes" will get an American publisher.


London; Mrs. Lewis: I'm sorry to have been out of touch for so long. I've been waiting for word about whether "Enemy Salvoes"


London; Mrs. Lewis: We are still awaiting news as to whether "Enemy Salvoes" has found an American publisher yet.


London; Mrs. Lewis: Did you ever hear from Linda Sandler in Canada asking your permission to publishe some


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: I understand you may have been visited by the police on Saturday! If so, my apologies. I had phoned


South Kensington; Mrs. Lewis: Thank you for your letter & enclosures. I've fixed up the phone business & you should have your connection


London; Mrs. Lewis: Here's a carbon of my letter to Cornell. I hope the letter arouses their interest. [Written on Fox TL[copy]S to Cornell, August 25, 1975.]


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Many thanks indeed for the money - even though tere was no need for any rush. Please let me know how the Barclay


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: I asked Alan Moore of Vision Press (who is to publish the selection of Wyndham Lewis literary criticism


London; Mrs. Lewis: I hope you're well, despite the chilly Fall weather. I also hope you are pressing ahead with your Memoir.


London; Mrs. Lewis: Hppy Guy Fawkes Day! I hope you're well. I'll be phoning you soon, & am still planning to get down


London; Mrs. Lewis: I should be able to get down to see you on the weekend of December 20-21. I hope that's ok for you.


London; Mrs. Lewis: I've tried phoning you twice this week but I get no answer. Did you receive your "Enemy Salvoes"?


London; Mrs. Lewis: Are you planning to attend the opening of the W.L. Exhibition in Brighton on Wednesday night?


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: I'm still shattered by the flu. Please excuse the stationery! So that the recording of Wyndham Lewis


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Again, your best bet is to get the 2:30 p.m. train on Friday afternoon from Torquay, changing at Exeter


Holland; Mrs. Lewis: Greetings from Holland! I have just seen Pier Van den Kruk in Utrecht & he & his family all send their warmest greetings


London; Mrs. Lewis: This is to confirm that I'll be down to see you on Friday, July 2, after lunch. See you then!


London; Mrs. Lewis: Good luck with your march on Mr. Barclay tomorrow! I will 'phone you on Friday to see how things went.


London; Mrs. Lewis: I've been trying to reach you by phone for the past few days but can't contact you. Might be a fault on the line?


London; Dear mrs. Lewis: I hope that, by the time you receive this, your phone will be back in action. I've been fighting


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Thanks again for your letter! I rang the telephone people in Exeter today about your 'phone.


London; Mrs. Lewis: Sorry I wasn't able to get down your way this weekend. I'm up to my neck trying to find a new flat


South Kensington; Mrs. Lewis: This is to confirm that I'll be down to see you on Saturday after lunch.


Berlin; Mrs. Lewis: I'm in Berlin attending the huge exhibition of modern art here. I'm sure you'd be delighted if you could see


London; Sirs: Thank you for the review copy of D.G. Bridson's "The Filibuster". Before writing a word about its contents,


London; Sirs: Believe it or not, the Wyndham Lewis photos (as per invoice # 80998), postmarked June 4 & sent airmail


London; Sirs: Is Signet Classic # CQ319, Wydham Lewis "A Soldier of Hume & Selected Writings" (ed. R. Rosenthal), still in print?


London; Dear Mr. White: Co-editor of the recent "Whydham Lewis on Art," I am now contemplating a new collaboration


London; Dear Sirs, We have been consulted by Mr. Godfrey Winn in reference to a book published by you called "The Doom of Youth",


London; Dear Sirs, [RE] Mr. Godfrey Winn and Messrs Chatto & Windus "Doom of Youth". We have your letter of yesterday


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis: God, I do feel I've been bad about you. I didn't develope the films straight away


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis. I wonder if you have seen any of my photos in the Portrait Gallery of the Sunday Times?


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Thanks for your letter. Yes, I will agree to your conditions and hope my efforts will overcome your prejudices


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, You will remember my coming and photographing you sometime ago. People's views on photographs vary


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I am delighted that you are prepared to sit for me again and as soon as the weather is a little more settled


London; My dear Mr. Wyndham-Lewis: Very many thanks for your letter - I was awfully interested to hear about the Arthur Press:


Rugby; Dear Wyndham: It will be quite [?] for me to sit to you for my portrait next week. I am so glad you are going to paint me;


Kingussie, N.S.; My dear Wyndham: Your telegram sent to the yacht, has just reached me here by post having followed me to Cawston & on


London; [Typed copy of letter in folder 10]


Rugby; Dear Wyndham, I enclose cheque for [pounds] 10-1-0 for seven copies of the "Apes". You will remember you owe me [pounds] 12


Rugby; My dear. I am sorry if there is a mistake over the pictures. I understood that they came to [pounds] 188.


Cawston; Please send my red lace dress.


London;Where can I see picture this morning wire me 2 Weymouth Street or telephone Welbeck 3867.


Nottingham; Please wire where I can see picture today or deliver picture to 2 Weymouth St. [With typed transcripts of telegrams in 13.3, 13.6, and 14.]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis. I have to thank you for receipt of your book the Apes of God which arrived here


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis. I enclose cheque for [pounds] 165 which I understand will pay for the 5 pictures I bought from you.


London; Can you lunch embassy today 1.30


London; Can you come here 3.30 today.


London; Can you lunch somewhere tomorrow.


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis. I have your letter of Nov. 3rd & herewith enclose cheque for [pounds] 300.


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis. I have your letter of 24th Nov. I have been trying to see my wife's portrait but so far without success.


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis. I am back in London now & will be here all this month. Will you let me know when it would be convenient


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis. I am sorry my wife has offended you regarding the portrait. I have not seen her for a long time


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis. I have my wife's portrait hung at Cuhoss House somewhat inadequatlely I agree


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I enclose cheque for [pounds] 165 which I understand will pay for the five pictures I bought from you. [Typed copy of letter in folder 16.]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I thought you might conceivably be interested in the article on 'Neglected Books'


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Please accept this copy of E.P.'s Women of Trachis, plus sundry items, abominable printed.


London; Dear Madam, re:- The late Percy Wyndham Lewis. We thank you for your letter of the 12th inst., and for the quotation [With receipt June 29, 1957 for 50 years lease.]


New York; Dear Sirs: Recently I read that Wyndham Lewis had passes away. I collect 'little mags' (the little literary magazines),


London; Dear Sir: As a student of comparative literature at the Sorbonne I have undertaken to write a doctoral thesis entitled


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Back in London after a long absence I discovered your article "The Sea Mists of the Winter",


Blois; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, many thanks for your reply to my letter. I am glad that you wish 'Tarr' to be translated into French.


Aix-en-Provence; Dear Mr. Lewis, Thank you for your letter. I am indeed sorry that our correspondence has fallen into abeyance;


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis- I am enclosing the letter from Rene Arnaud. You will detect some faulty expressions


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis. In unpacking my furniture after eight years of storage I came across your book "Consent san Dead


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I have just read your last book which gave me not only great enjoyment but was


London; Dear Sirs, We have been instructed by Mr. Rupert Grayson of 66, Curzon Street, W. 1. in connection with certain matters [re: "Snooty Baronet"]


London; Dear Sir, We have been instructed by Mr. Rupert Grayson of 66, Curzon Street, W. 1. in connection with certain matters [re: "Snooty Baronet"]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis. At rather short notice with the help of John Nepper I have organised an exhibition


Doncaster; ...I have not run up against but few of the same relationship either because from a matter of wisdom the Jew who leaves his Race


Baltimore; Dear Sirs: For many years I have known of the distinguished work of Wyndham Lewis in literature and the graphic arts. [Signed David A. Robertson]


Cape Town, So.Africa; Dear Sir, I have just read your book "The Red Priest" and thought the illustrated dust cover excellent.


St. Louis; Dear Mr. Lewis, Thank you again for the lovely picture. I thought you might like to know my husband is equally enthsiastic about it.


New York; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Your address was given to me by Mr. C. J. Citron, of T. M. Williams of Oxford Street, London.


New York; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Thank you for your letter of September 18th and for the information concerning the possibility of getting together


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis. I am writing to you at the suggestion of the Rights Department at Eyre Methuen, as I am very interested [Signed R. B. Woodings]


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Granada Publishing Limited would like to reproduce Portrait of Virginia Woolf C. 1923 drawyn by Wyndham Lewis [Signed Celia Dearing]


Halesworth; Dear Lewis. I asked my friend to write straight to you to save time but he has written to me here & as I was not able to come


London; Dear Lewis. Barker came to see the pictures this evening & refused to have anything that would be seen from the audience


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis. The friend of W. B. Yeats' friend, the one who sent the telegram, was present when Laura Riding fell into a stone area


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis. Laura Riding has asked me to recover from you some manuscript of hers which she sent you, at your request,


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis. Many thanks for your note. There can be no meeting for the present because Laura Riding is going into complete retirement.


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Good. At the Bodege Friday at 1 as you suggest.


London; Dear Lewis, I enclose a ticket for an interesting concert to-morrow evening, at the Queen's Hall. Go if you can.


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis. The man MacFee out of Filibuster's in Barbary is making lots of trouble. Can you give us the low down [Signed Rupert Grayson.]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Messrs. A. M. heath & Co. Ltd., have requested us to write you regarding royalties on the "APES OF GOD" [Signed E. G. Taylor]


Cardiff; Dear Madam, According to a letter dated in September 1968 which I received, you stated that the royalties received in respect [With Statement of Income Paid...form for 1968.]


Cardiff; Dear Madam, I refer to the Schedule D tax outstanding for the year 1973/74 and would respectfully state that letters [Signed B. J. Greenaway]


London; Sir, I am directed to inform you that the United Kingdom High Commissioner in Canada has reported the cost of express charges [Signed F. J. Ireland]


London; Sir, I am directed to enclose a copy of a letter addressed to you from this Department on the 31st August, 1946, [Signed F. J. Ireland]


London; Sir, I am directed to enclose a copy of a letter which was addressed to you on the 18th February, and to which no reply [Signed F. J. Ireland]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, You telegraphed yesterday to Mr. Malcolm MacDonald care of this Office to enquire whether your war picture [Signed James Dutton]


Surrey; Dear Madam. Thank you for your letter of 27 May with enclosure. I note that you mention in your letter to the Inspector of Taxes [Signed R.W. Simmons; with copy of Deduction Card form and second letter informing her of arrears amount for pension.]


London; [Statement of Claim between Alec Waugh and Chatto & Windus and Wyndham Lewis re: "Doom of Youth"]


London; Dear Sir, In connection with a scheme for utilizing the artistic resources of the country for record purposes, it has been suggested [Signed A. Yorkney]


London; Dear Sir, Your letter was read as [sic] a Meeting of the Committee a few days ago and I was instructed to inform you that [Signed A. Yorkney]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, As you will see fromt he enclosures, the War Artists' Advisory Ctee is in hopes that you would care to make [Signed Arnold Palmer]


London; Dear Sir, I write to inform you that you are asked to undertake for the Ministry of Information the recording of aspects of Canada's war effort [Signed ?]


London; Dear Sir, I write to confirm that you are asked to undertake for the Ministry of Information a sigle large painting or a series of drawings, [Signed ?]


Ottawa; Dear Mr. Lewis, I have arranged for the crate with the unfinished picture to be sent to you c/o the London depot of the Canadian National Express, [Signed E. L. Sykes]


Ottawa; Dear Sir Wyndham, Your letter of the 27th of November has been passed to me and as I have not heard from the Ministry of Informaion [Signed Eliot Warburton]


Ottawa; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, In response to the request made in your letter of the 1st May, I enclose herewith a cheque for $150. [Signed O. L. Williams]


Ottawa; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, In response to your letter of the 19th May, I am enclosing herewith a cheque for $100.00 [Signed O.L. Williams]


Ottawa; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, On making enquiries through the Department of External Affairs, I eventually discovered that there has been [Signed O. L. Williams]


Ottawa; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, In response to your further letter of the 5th June, I now enclose a final cheque for $114.50 representing the final instalment [sic] [Signed O.L. Williams]


Ottawa; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, At long last we have received from the Department of External Affairs the cheque for $644.50, [Signed O.L. Williams]


Ottawa; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis: May I be forgiven for bothering you with a small bureaucratic detail in connexion with the payment [Signed O.L. Williams]


Ottawa; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis: In the High Commissioner's absence in the United Kingdom, I am writing to let you know that we have [Signed O.L. Williams]


Ottawa; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis: May I refer to your letter to me of the 9th November (which I showed to the High Commissioner on his return) [Signed O.L. Williams]


Ottawa; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, As the High Commissioner is away from Ottava at the present meoment I am writing to acknowledge [Signed O.L. Williams]


Ottawa; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, In the absence of the High Commissioner, who is at present in the United Kingdom, I am writing in acknowledgment [Signed O.L. Williams]


London; Sir, I am directed by the Paymaster General to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of 8 March concerining the additional Civil List [Signed L. H. Perry]


London; Dear Sir, I am desired by the Prime Minister to inform you that, on his recommendation, The Queen has be pleased to award you [Signed E. G. Cass]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I write to thank you for your of the 27th March notifying me of your address, which has been placed on record. [Signed E. G. Cass]


London; Dear Sir, I am desired by the Prime Minister to inform you that, on his recommendation, The Queen has been pleased to award you [Signed Anthony Bevin]


Scottsdale, AZ; Dear Mrs. Lewis: I became a great admirer of Mr. Lewis's drawings and paintings several years ago.


Toronto; Dear Mr. Lewis: I can guess that you probably want to guard your time, but, if you happen to be free to-morrow evening,


Westport, CT; Dear Sir: We are trying to locate the owner of the publishing rights to the book entitled: THE WRITER AND THE ABSOLUTE [With 2 other letters and contract and invoice with copy all dealing with the same book.]


London; No sign of glaucoma when I saw you but may have developed since stop advise you follow doctors treatment stop


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, As I had not heard any further news of you since your visit, I rang up Dr. Macpherson today,


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis. P.H. Jewitt & I will take this opportunity of coming to see you on Friday next.


New York; Dear Mr. & Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, I do hope you haven't forgotten our conversation at Prof. Doanld Calrk's party.


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis, I've asked my publisher to send you a copy of my last book (I've done only 2) and please don't feel under obligation


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, It seems almost an impertinence to write to you but I was so shocked by the revelation in your 'Listener' article


Swindon; Dear Lewis, I am very glad to hear of the exhibition; and shall hope to see many things at last I know of only in reproduction.


London; Dear Lewis, I have been meaning to write to you for some time but have had no address so I am sending this c/o Dents.


Swindon; Dear Lewis, May I come to see you some time soon when I'm in London? As I think he's told you, I see Roy Campbell from time to time


London; BBC want me to do programme on you living writers series any objections urgent.


Swindon; Dear Lewis, Many thanks for your letter. I did not know whether the talk was too combative or not and I am greatly relieved to hear


Swindon; Dear Lewis, Many thanks for the de Tocqueville article, which I am acknowledging straight away, before having read it all.


Swindon; Dear Lewis, I had already asked Routledges to send you a cheque straight away. Rouse is not the only unspeakable idiot,


Swindon; Dear Lewis, I don't know whether you could do anything to help this chap, who wants photographs of your early work.


Swindon; Dear Lewis, Leonie Cohen mentioned that business of the air a few weeks ago, and I would most willingly do my part of it.


Swindon; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Two things have delayed this reply. I was away when your letter came, and then when I read it I had to make some enquiries.


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, re: Your late husband's estate. I refer to your call upon me yesterday, and enclose herewith copy of a letter we have today written [With second letter of July 30, 1962 and Grobel invoice for services.]


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, re: "Letters of Wyndham Lewis". I write to acknowledge and thank you for your letter of the 26th instant [With TL[copy] of Grobel letter to J. Alan white, July 28, 1962, Grobel TLS to Mrs. Lewis, November 9, 1962, and TD list of documents returned to Mrs. Lewis 18th November 1963.]


London; Dear Sir, As requested by you, we now have pleasure in enclosing herewith a schedule showing the total number of credits [With mentioned schedule as well as 1932-1933 record from Lloyds Bank Limited.]


Ascot; Dear Mr. Lewis, I am much flattered that you should care to draw me and will be very glad to sit when I come back to London.


London; My dear Lewis, I've just got a big photograph of your Edith Sitwell; it is superb. Its a magnificent work.


London; My dear Lewis, Thank you very much for your letter, and for giving me permission to us the two pictures... I can get an excellent


Littleton; My dear Lewis, Thank you for your letter which I got yesterday ... and tried desperately to contact you. I expect you have a telephone


Lechdale; My dear Lewis, I made one or two shots to reach you wile I was in London ...Have you a telephone? I wanted to ask you two things


Lechdale; My dear Lewis, There is a copy of my book ... at long last ... I do hope you'll like it and think your two very beautiful picture came out well.


Littleton; My dear Lewis, John gave me your address. I'm doing a show called "Portraits" for C.E.M.A. This consists of about 80 large photographs


Lechdale; My dear Lewis, Congratulations on your most excellent 3rd programme talk ... I do hope they'll keep you at it. Also I ws very glad to hear Grigson speak


Lechdale; Dear Lewis, Yes, thank you I got your message & now am very sorry to hear about your flu ... I used to get it regularly


Lechdale; My dear Lewis, It was most awfully good of you to lend your portrait to the Portrait Row and a great many people admired it


Esher; Was ignorant of facts about Pound of course will withdraw picture may I come Tuesday 5 pm if inconvenient telegraph Slade.


London; Am told blasted people garged in on you take no notice apologies of course 10 pound named or unamed vive McCloud.


New York; [Essay (perhaps for radio) on the life of Lewis, begins on page 2.]


New York; Dear Lewis: I was supposed to go toSt. Louis on the 24th but I got a delay owing to my request for a change of jurisdiction.


St. Louis; Dear Mr. & Mrs. Lewis: I wish to thank you for having received and entertained us so graciously. I ask you to believe that not withstanding


St. Louis; Dear Mr. Lewis: Having suddenly recalled the other day that I had once met Mr. Nagel, Director of the City Art Museum, and remembering that he seemed


St. Louis; Dear Lewis: I wish to acknowledge receipt of your letters of the 9th and 11th, and your manuscript enclosure of the 13th


St. Louis; Dear Lewis: This is to acknowledge receipt of the two folders of cuts and prints. McLuhan will have written you about the outcome


St. Louis; Dear Lewis: I am delighted to see you in such excellent spirits over the Nagel affair, a bit of business about which I was far from proud.


[St. Louis; Dear Lewis, Your answer I didn't think at all tardy (sic); and in spite of your fine promises you did put a seven-cent stamp on the envelope.


St. Louis; Dear Lewis: You will hear, or you will have heard, the new development at this end: Mrs. Gelhorn's successful brow beating of three of her well chums


St. Louis; Dear Lewis: In haste and without amenities: Nagel has, I believe, offered you Feb. 13th or Feb. 20th. If you have already answered, this note will be needless,


St. Louis; Dear Lewis: Sorry to pester you again. But I did promise to write you within three days of the other letter. I have nothing new to tell you.


St. Louis; Dear Lewis: You may set at rest any anxiety felt over Mc Luhan. He recovered in time to make his proected trip and is already back.


St. Louis; Dear Lewis: Mac has just telephoned me and I am now hastening to send you what you need. If you find that you've miscalculated,


St. Louis; Dear Lewis: I hope that you are not too exhausted & disgusted over the constant seesaw to which Mac and I have subjected you.


St. Louis; Dear Lewis: Another letter! Having just read your latest to Mac I feel impelled to make a trifling amplification on my last.


St. Louis; Dear Lewis: I have read your latest to MacLuhan and I am heartily in sympathy with your "small" view of the exploitive possibilities of St. Louis.


St. Louis; Dear Lewis: Forgive the belated answer, but I've been ensnarled in miles and miles of red tape and am just now beginning to see thru


St. Louis; Dear Lewis: I have taken careful note of your last and wish to assure you that there is no need to rush matters as far as ticket


St. Louis; Dear Lewis: Here it is: I have a great affection for you. I have even tried to dislike you, but it's no use. One thing, however, is clear to me:


St. Louis; Dear Lewis: Two months have now elapsed since you left our apartment, I don't know how many or what things outstanding there are between us.


St. Louis; Dear Lewis: I have received $145.00 from Mr. Wyndham Lewis on May 26th. This payment puts us on an even basis.


St. Louis; Dear Lewis: By the time you receive this, I shall be on the Fridan noon train to join Margaret for a vacation.


St. Louis; Dear Lewis: I am taking the liberty of entering into a new relationship with you, namely a contractual one.


St. Louis; Dear Lewis: I am utterly delighted to see you agreeable to the arrangement vaguely outlined in my last. I can consider myself extremely lucky,


New York; Dear Lewis: One month ago I was re-classified into 1A and just three days ago my Draft Board flatly informed me that I am to be inducted


New York; Dear Lewis: Glad to hear that you're back safe in England. After all six years in America is six years, c'est-a-dire, to Damned much.


New York; Dear Lewis: About that picture, I suspected customs and shipping difficulties from the very first. No one is fretting over it,


New York; Dear Lewises: Will you check the items you want most from this list? I want to send you something monthly for the next six months.


New York; Dear Lewis: Glad to have heard from you so promply. After receiving your letter this morning we went up to Gimbel's


New York; Postscript: Tuesday - Just had a thoroughgoing discussion with Sargent and the publicity manager, Miss Thomas, as to ways and means.


New York; Postscript No. 2: I've just received the "Vita". A splendidly objecting "selbst biographie" and very meaty. As you will have noticed


New York; Postscription. I notice that I haven't answered your question concerning Macdonald and Politics. Fickle Dwight has changed his mind again


New York; PAGE # 3. Not much to tell you about the Sitwells. They are going back in about a month according to Leon Given of Vanguard Press,


New York; Dear Lewis: A less gloomy report this time. Primarily I am writing you to let you know that Doubleday has finally turned over the remaining $225.00.


New York; Dear Lewis: A hasty scribble as I am in the throes of redecoration. I was finally able to get some action out of the Pacific Realty Co.


New York; Dear Lewis: I sent you a letter yesterday and to-day I receive your letter of the 8th. Tuoni, lampi, a procelle...! Or... showers of sparks,


New York; Dear Lewis: Today I arranged to have Parcel 3 shipped to you. It ought to reach you within three weeks. Here it is, such as it is:


New York; Dear Lewis: I have this day sent parcel No. 5, exactly four weeks after my wife sent off No.4, -- which I hope you have received,


New York; Dear Lewis: Since I had given you to understand that you would be hearing from me long before now, I owe you apologies for this delay.


New York; Dear Lewis: I have received the Buffalo and London Times clippings, plus the "Enemy" item. I am sending the Burrelly Clipping Bureau $22.50


New York; Dear Lewis: Today, June 21, I received a check for $75.00 made out to me at your request. The number of the check is 6805


New York; Dear Lewis: For your information: I have not yet received word from you as to the desposition of the $75.00 check from Sewanee Review


New York; Dear Lewis: I have just dispatched a letter to Nash acquainting him with the terms of your answer to mine. I was careful to relay your terms


New York; Dear Lewis: Excuse the tardiness of my answer. I've just come back to New York after a three week's absence. My father finally died


New York; Dear Lewis: When I got your book, I read it immediately and then called up a friendly young punk at Doubleday


New York; Dear Lewis: Many thanks for your two very informative letters. I am delighted on personal as well as business grounds to know your present activities


New York; Dear Lewis: I have agreed to the following: Advance $750.00, Cession of serialization right, Royalties at 10 % for the first 5000


New York; Dear Lewis: Helas! A snag! But happily -- of the most temporary. Doubleday wrote a "form" letter of inquiry to Watson & Nicholson


New York; Dear Lewis: Everything, as you probably know by now, has been ironed out. You were right of course. Today is Friday.


New York; Dear Lewis: Have received your appalling account of that rascal Roberts and some comment seems in order in spite of my promise


New York; Dear Lewis: Sargent gave me the impression last week that the contract would be ready for signing by about today. I called him this morning,


New York; Dear Lewis: This is Sunday. Friday morning I sent you a letter (which barring accidents you will have received Monday) stating that Sargent had telephoned me


New York; Contrato concludio Roberto excludio


New York; Dear Lewis: Under separate cover and at one-half day intervals I shall send you three copies of the contract for your signature.


New York; Dear Lewis: By the time you receive this, you should have received three, possibly four pieces of mail from me: the cablegram, the airm-mail letter


New York; Dear Lewis: Primo, I acknowledge three letters, and three other separate enclosures: New Verse W.L. Issue, Fabe & Faber


New York; Dear Lewis: First, a piece of bad news. Instead of receiving a check for $750.00, I got one for $535.00. The dear British government has already taken


New York; Dear Lewis: Two hours ago I sent you a letter (with the addendum) informing you of the withholding of $525.00 (30% British witholding tax).


New York; Dear Lewis: Yesterday, Tuesday, I sent you two letters bearing on this $225.00 deduction made in your check.


New York; Dear Lewis: Glad to hear that you are overcoming your cold. Soignez-vous, je vous prie. Qui va piano, vas sano; qui van sono, va bontano!


New York; Dear Lewis: Received yours of the 11th this morning and hasten to reply as you are under the impression I have not told you all I know


New York; Dear Lewis: Colston Leigh's seem interested but its too late, as I feared, to do anything about the '48-'49 season .


New York; Dear Lewis: Your two manuscripts just arrived. Delighted with them, expecially "The Rot". I am writint you in hot haste, not to acknowledge the MSS.


New York; Dear Lewis: Sorry to hear about your influenza and happy it is no more. My plan with regard to extra copies of America & Cosmic Man


New York; Dear Lewis: Thank you for your letter of the 18th. It was delayed a full week, no doubt by the Christmas rush and crush. I am so very glad for you


New York; Dear Lewis: On the 24th, I had Gimbels send you 10 boxes of hot roll mix and to-day, the 26th, I've forwarded another shipment


[Refiled in folder 94.]


New York; Dear Lewis: As you say, it has been sometime by prevailing standard we have written, and now, you've come through with a magnificent letter.


New York; Dear Lewis: I hasten to answer your letter of the 3rd. You won't take it amiss if I begin by remonstrating that my letter was no so abound


New York; Dear Lewis: I am extremely happy to hear from you that Palmer has accepted the Rotting Hill sketch. I am sorry that I didn't reflect


New York; Dear Lewis: There may just be something in what you say about approaching Ransome at this time. At all events I will make no moves


New York; Dear Lewis: Macdonald will have written you by now with regard to certain excisions - se seemed to like the essay very much


New York; Dear Lewis: A rapid round-up of current developments. Doubleday has been extremely co-operative in sending out books to some


New York; Dear Lewis: You will learn of it soon enought, but to make sure that you have the information at the earliest, I am happy to report


New York; Dear Lewis: It is indeed gratifying to be the object of such praise from such a source. You exaggerated like hell but let me assure you


New York; Dear Lewis: I forgot to bring up an item of business in my last, namely the matter of getting America and Cosmic Man into the hands of various continental


[Refiled in folder 93]


New York; Dear Lewis: As you know, your book was issued 10 days ago and the reviews are just beginning to appear. As you can see from the enclosures,


New York; Dear Lewis: Since mailing you my letter of the 20th, I've received yours of the 17th to say nothing of the letter you had forgotten to post.


New York; Dear Lewis: Your letter came yesterday & "Time Magazine" is out to-day. So, a brief word and enclosure.


New York; Dear Lewis: First, to correct myself. Alfred Barr is still with the "Museum of Modern Art" as Director of Museum Collections.


New York; Dear Lewis: Pardon the delay in answering your two letters. I am not only teaching 20 hours a week, currently, but I have been


New York; Dear Lewis: Just a few words to let you know I am still alive. I did not intend the allow two months go by without saying something,


New York; Dear Lewis: Delighted hear from you and much impressed by the letterhead. As to Williams the main thing holding me back is his delay


New York; Dear Lewis: Robert Payne, an English poet & sinologist and editor of a new magazine called "Montevallo Review",


New York; ... Hugh Kenner's address is 57 Shell Street, Milford, Connecticut and he is still at Yale. I know that he will be very pleased to hear from you.


New York; Dear Lewis: I am distressed beyond words by the news of your bad health and earnestly hope that you will recover speedily.


New York; [Refiled in folder 95.]


New York; Dear Lewis: I must apologize to you for having written so apparently a depressing letter. I had no idea it sounded quite so lugubrious


New York; Dear Lewis: Having been out of a town a good part of the summer in connection with an attempt (Fruitless, to mend my sagging finances)


New York; Dear Mrs. Lewis: I have been looking at the private note enclosed with my last letter to W. L., and I notice that in reply to your telling me


New York; Re: Your letter of the 24th of May. Dear Mr. Morley, Thank you for your letter of inquiry under date of the 24th.


New York; Dear Lewis: About two more weeks and I'll be through translating my muvvle--you now know why my letters have ben so sparse lately.


New York; Dear E.P., A splendid idea, that of sounding out Weiss. I only wish I knew him. I've written McLuhan (whom I remember as having [Short note typed to W. Lewis from Pound at head of letter.]


New York; Dear Mrs. Lewis: It was good to hear from you, but how can I answer your letter without reminding you, all to explicity, of how long I've taken?


New York; Dear Lewis: Since we didn't get together for the cocktails at Forest Park, perhaps we'll find the Gotham an even better spot


Parramatta, N.S.W.; Dear Mr. Lewis. I was very sorry to read about the Sea Mists of Winter, & hope that lovely words & lovely sounds


Letchworth; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, This is to confirm the cable which we sent to you yesterday, as follows: "IN PRESENT SITUATION UNWISE PRINT BOOK


Windsor; Dear Dr. Lewis, I am forced to begin this letter with a plea for forgiveness at my long delay in answering you. I have only one explanation


Davis, CA.; Dear Mrs. Lewis. I am currently engaged in a direct study of your lat husband's writings and, as such, must perforce join the throng


Rome; Dear Sir, In my forthcoming book on intellectuals and politics I am proposing to quote the following passages from the works of Wyndham Lewis: [Originally sent to Chatto & Windus who forwarded it to Mrs. Lewis for reply.]


Toronto; Dear Mr. Lewis. I have given your address to mty Refugee-Guest Dr. Sternbach, who will now trace back the enquiry to its source,


Toronto; Dear Mr. Lewis. I am very sorry to hear about the grippe, but you are very wise not to go out, for we have a very nasty variety of the disease here,


London; Dear Lewis. Did you get my letter about the [?] performance on Sunday, & have you the manuscript Pound maintains


London; Dear Lewis. I was here at 2.30 & waited an hour. As I want to get some work done I am going back as I don't know when you may return


Torquay; Dear Mrs. Lewis, CUBISM by Nicholas Wadley. We should very much like to include a black and white photograph of Composition 1913 [Signed Hilary Holmes]


Middlesex; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, The Tate Gallery has asked me to obtain your permission to reproduce the painting "Composition" now in the gallery. [Signed Deborah Trenerry]


Hull; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, I hope you will be good enough to forgive my addressing you 'out of the blue' like this: the suggestion that I might do so


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, I found myself shocked and strangely moved when through a friend I heard of the news given over the wireless


Steyning, Sussex; I very much hope you and Mrs. Wyndham Lewis are well, Flu is everywhere, it seems, a very unpleasant variety.


Blandford; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I think it may help you to identify me if I say at the outset that I introduced you to the audience


Blandford; Dear Mr. Lewis, This is to thank you for your most encouraging note which I found waiting for me on my return from London


Blandford; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you very much for your letter by express post. I am replying in haste and at once because I think you


Blandford; Arriving about noon Monday would very much like to lunch with you.


Blandford; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I had hoped for a letter from Fabers on Friday or Saturday of last week, but nothing came.


Blandford; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, May I say again how very disconcerted I was to learn that my letter had caused you such anxiety.


Blandford; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Very many thanks for your letter which came this morning. By the same post I had also a note from Mr. T.S. Eliot


Blandford; I am extremely distressed by your telegram and very deeply regret aniety caused by my letter I have in fact written Newton


Blandford; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I am at present obliged to invigilate at an examination and am therefore unable to use a type-writer.


Blandford; Delay in writing entirely unavoidable I am posting letter today.


Steyning; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I feel I ought to give you a report on such progress as I have been able to make with my essay.


Steyning; Have sent off by express letter essay pland and completed section in draft.


Steyning; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you for your telegram. Your very generous offer of help is most encouraging coming at this stage,


Steyning; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you very much indeed for your telegram. May I most earnestly assure you


Steyning; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you for your letter and the appreciative remarks and will keep it for reference.


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I am enclosing with this letter the Historical Note, together with several other items.


Blandford; Entirely willing to accept forty pounds and waive royalties can be with you Monday anytime between 11 am and 5.30 pm


Blandford; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Very many thanks for your last letter. May I assume that it will be convenient to you for me to call at 5 pm


Blandford; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Very many thanks for your last letter. I think I had a sharp dose of 'flu following several days severe stomach disorder.


Blandford; Many apologies delay term over today am very unwell and must recuperate at Steyning till move to London on Jan. 5th


Steyning; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Now that I am really well again I am writing to ask if I may call on Saturday, Jan. 7th


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I have just finished the dust-wrapper for "The Writer and the Absolute" and I now enclose it with this letter.


London; I am following your suggestion that I should send you a card while we are on our travels; but it has been difficult to decided on the best card


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I have begun his letter in my head perhaps twenty times and there are also several trial shots


Heworth, York; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, As an admirer to your writings, I do hope you will accept the accompanying book


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham-Lewis, I am sending you three photographs of the type of paintings you described over the telephone [Signed Mary Dernbach]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, This is the firs "fan-letter" I have ever written in my life; and at thirty-two I realize that I'm too old to start.


New York; Sir, The way in which, without dispute or contradiction, the views of Dr. A. N. Whitehead are from time to time extolled in you pages [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; Sir, Mr. Richard Hughes, whoever he may be, is of course welcome to the opinion he expressed in your issue of August 27 [Signed Montgomery Belgion; typed note to Lewis at top of page.]


New York; Dear Lewis, Mencken suggests Wednesday 5 p.m. at his place in the Algonquin "for a dram." He won't hit New York until tomorrow[Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; Dear Lewis: It really seems to me that not six but two copies of "Time and Western Man" will not be enought for the office. [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; Dear Lewis: I was glad to get your letter and to know that you had had a pleasant crossing. The reason I say only two copies of the book [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; Dear Lewis, I write privately. If this seems rot, disregard it. But the more I ruminate over the "Time" book, the more it strikes me [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; My dear Lewis: Your letter of the 26th this morning. I enclose a check on London for [pounds] 100, and this will leave only [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; My dear Lewis: What about the Apes of God? In your last letter you spoke of sitting down to finish your "big book." [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; My dear Lewis: I enclose the proposed blurb for THE APES OF GOOD, about which I spoke. For TIME AND WESTERN MAN [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; Dear Lewis: "The Enemy" arrived yesterday morning. I did not go to bed until I had read through it as far as the end of "Paleface." [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; Harcourt wants see complet apes suggest therefore waiting your arrival writing. [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; My dear Lewis: Your pleasant letter of October 15th reached me this morning. Alas, there is nothing in it about the copy [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; My dear Lewis: Many thanks for all the information in your letter of October 23rd. 1. Let me say first that I hope the exhibition [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; My dear Lewis: I enclose a copy of the material I hurriedly dictated yesterday [Enclosed is a biographical blurb for a Lewis book. Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; New preface splendid. [Signed Harbrace]


New York; My dear Lewis: I have received your two letters, (1) containing the new preface, and (2) containing the changes in the present preface. [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; Dear Lewis: Kein turned up yesterday morning. It is immense. In the enthusiasm immediately following a first reading, [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; My dear Lewis: Regarding the attached: The Saturday Review told me after I had sent the letter that they submitted the review to you [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; My dear Lewis: Herewith check for [pounds] 100, being balance of advance due on "Time and Western Man" on December first. [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; Told Leakins stop publication Apes here simulaneous with Chatto essential won't you if spring cable me terms [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; Dear Lewis: I have two letters, both of November 29th, and two cables to acknowledge to you. Let me first say how much I appreciate [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis: I was sorry not to have been able to meet you when you were in America last Summer. I had known of your work [Signed Harrison Smith]


New York; Dear Lewis: I posted to you yesterday, by letter post though not registered, page proofs of the American edition of "Western Man."[Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; Dear Lewis: Early in November I mentioned that I could do with two more copies of "The Enemy" No. 2. I imagine you overlooked this. [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; Dear Lewis: Your cable this morning. The "satisfying" correction will be made. If there is still time to follow your "renumbering [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; My dear Lewis, Your long and interesting letter of December 6, did not reach here until last Monday, the 19th. I can best answer it, [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; My dear Lewis, It occurred to me yesterday when I received yours of December 23 that my last two letters were being very depressing [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; Fear you may be more depressed than warranted hope you are finishing Apes in grand style writing. [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; My dear Lewis, Your note of the 3rd this moring. My object in corresponding unofficially with you has been to try ans show you [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; My dear Lewis: A copy of our edition of "Time and Western Man" is being sent to you under separate cover. [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; My dear Lewis, I am distinctly relieved by the news, in your letter of January 20 (received yesterday), that you will publish [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; My dear Lewis: I sent off one copy of "The Wild Body" to you yesterday, but it is a bad printing and plese consider you are still entitled to six, [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; Dear Lewis, The first review comes from Milwaukee, strangely enough! I shall write shortly in reference to what you wrote to me about Eliot.[Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; My dear Lewis, Only one review this week: patronizing garbage, I fear, but you will have been prepared for it by the man's remarks [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; Dear Lewis: I forward four more reviews. The one by Mortimer J. Adler, whom I know, seems the best review of your book [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; My dear Lewis: Another two reviews herewith. Feakins has been inquiring when you are coming over and no doubt has cabled [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; My dear Lewis, Your cable this morning. I had no idea you were laid up with influenza; how unfortunate [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; Dear Lewis: Canby rang me up yesterday to know if you would be in this country next month, [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; My dear Lewis: The Chatto leaflet enclosed with your note of March 20 is very cheering; [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; Dear Lewis: Thanks for your cable about Canby. He says he may arrange one extra P.E.N. Club dinner [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; My dear Lewis: Thanks for your cable. Mrs. Meloney, whom I have never met, telephoned to us some days ago [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; Dear Lewis, Your letter of the 13th (which was most welcome) shows that I have entirely failed to make myself clear [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; Dear Lewis, Canby has been having a word with me about his P.E.N. Club dinner and your coming over. [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; My dear Lewis, Your inquiry: Why should a best-seller require pushing, or "sponsoring," in that way, [Signed Montgomery Belgion]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis: We are sending you under separate cover a number of reviews of TIME AND WESTERN MAN [Signed John D. Chase]


New York; Dear Sirs: I am writing to request permission to reprint the material listed below in one of our forthcoming college textbooks [Signed Christine L. Petrone]


New York; Dear Mrs. Lewis: On October 28, 1969 you were kind enough to write us that we might use Wyndham Lewis' article [With receipt stub for $50 permission fee. Signed Christine L. Petrone]


[London] Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I hope you are better now. I haven't had the time until now, to contact you


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I have been an admirer of your work from the moment I read The Caliphs Design;


London; Our phone is not yet installed but will shortly be in comm.u. Have briefly glanced through "Rude Assignment"


London; Dear Wyndham, I hope you and Mrs. W.L. are well. We are, and just getting used to a son born on Aug. 24.


Little Hadham; Dear Wyndham, I've lost you. Twice I've been to call at 18 Ashley Mansions and the last time


Ware; DearWyndham , I hope you are well. It was very nice to hear you on the phone the other week, and I am glad to say


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Please accept an expression of great sympathy with you from an old friend


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, It was with very great sorrow and regret indeed that Mrs. Harmsworth and I heard of the death


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Professors Richard J. Finneran, William M. Murphy, and I are preparing an edition


New York; Dear Mrs. Lewis: For one of our forthcoming trade books titled "Space in Poetry and Painting" [Signed Eve Sutton]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis: By the time this letter reaches you, you will have received word through our London office [SignedEugene F. Saxton


London; Dear Lewis, This is to advise you that we undertake to set up and publish in American "The Art of Being Ruled" [Signed Cass Canfield]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis: I am writing you with reference to THE ART OF BEING RULED which we published in 1926 [Signed Emily Dugdale}


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis, Mr. Canfield has passed over to the Magazine the manuscript of your article, [Signed Lee Foster Hartman]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Mr. Ford- Maddox- Hueffer has written to me & enclosed your letter. Of course I want you to do my room,


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Both Garnett and I have read your manuscript with great interest and (believe it or not) some disagreement.


Norton Priory, Sussex; As I shall not be seeing you again, there is no hurry about writing . no period before which to 'get in' a letter


Train to Oxford; I am really going away to Sussex tomorrow about 3. If you can, will you have lunch at Pugani's


Norton Priory, Sussex; Please buy with enclosed, that table - I should so like to be able to imagine you with it


Norton Priory, Sussex; O Lewis I believe you are not quite truthful. I believe that the dandelionish sunflower of the wild willows


Train; I lost the pencil one bought, but have been lent one by my vis a vis! that daring young man who promised the fine edition


[n.p.] I was so sorry about the non-extension of leave; quite downcast for a while after leaving the 'phone.


[n.p.]; Mon adorable Wyndham. Je viens de relire votre premiere lettre; elle me semble plus que parfaite


Norton Priory, Sussex; Mon cher Wyndham. Voila quatre jours depuis que je vous n'quitte et pas un mot


Norton Priory, Sussex; I was inordinately pleased with the seven and a 1/2 lines you wrote me on the 10 inst.


Kingston; Dearest Lewis. Here is the answer to your 'bit of literature', I[sic] was so pleasant to see you again the other day


Cambridge, MA; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Thank you for your letter of August 17th. I wonder if you could give me some account [Signed William A. Jackson]


Cambridge, MA; Dear Mr. Lewis: Mr. Kissinger is away from the office for a few days, and in his absence I am writing [Signed June M. Martin)


Suffolk; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, I am so sorry to hear of your husban's death, and that he was ill for so long.


New York; Dear Mrs. Lewis: We are interested in reprinting THE ART OF BEING RULED by Wyndham Lewis


Paris; Dear Mr. Lewis, I wish you were here to talk to. I have nothing to write. Orage no doubt expects you to reply


[n.p.] I cannot see you again for a long time. My love for you is altogether beyond me. You become more adorable every time


Florence; Dear Lewis- I wonder if you remember an old friend of the Montparnasse quarter, Nina Haweis?


Torquay; Dear Mrs. Lewis/ Further to my visit on 26 October 1970. I have made further enquiries and would like to see you again.


Washington, D.C.; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Leiws- Just how can I go about this? You can say "thank you" for a seat on a bus


London; [Payments to Lewis plus Guaranty Trust Co. form with credit for Lewis from a cheque.]


London; [Payments to Lewis for HITLER]


London; [Payments to Lewis plus a TLS of Jul.29, 1933.]


London; [Payments to Lewis]


London; [Payments to Lewis]


London; ... Personally, I am all in favour of that because I believe the book is going to be a success in America [Signed C.H. Brooks]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I am very much obliged for the two copies of PALEFACE and the copy of THE APES OF GOD [Signed C.H. Brooks]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Herewith our cheque for [pound] 1.9.5. representing the balance of [Signed C.H. Brooks]


London; Dear Lewis, Thank you very much for your letter of June 2nd from Fez, which seems to have been very much delayed [Signed C.H. Brooks]


London; Dear Lewis, I pass on to you herewith a letter which has reached us from Mrs. Meloney. [Signed C.H. Brooks]


London; Dear Lewis, I am sorry to say that I have just received a cable from New York to the effect that Putnam's [Signed C.H. Brooks]


London; Dear Lewis, Herewith our cheque for [pounds] 6.9s. 4d. in accordance with the enclosed statement, [Signed C.H. Brooks]


London; Dear Lewis, I hear from Rupert Grayson that you have offered him the rights in a new book, and I shall be glad [Signed C.H. Brooks]


London; Dear Lewis, This is just to confirm that we have today written to Brandt & Brandt asking them formally to cease offering your work [Signed C.H. Brooks]


London; Dear Lewis, I got the royalty statement from Graysons after you called, but on going through it found an error, [Signed C.H. Brooks]


London; Dear Lewis, On receipt of your letter of December 11th regarding payments made by this firm from April [Signed C.H. Brooks]


London; Dear Lewis, I enclose herewith a statement received from Grayson & Grayson showing sales of THE APES OF GOD [Signed C.H. Brooks]


London; Dear Lewis, I am as much in the dark as you concerning the grounds Grayson & Grayson have for stating that money [Signed C.H. Brooks]


London; Dear Lewis, I wish you would let me hear from you. You know we made no difficulties about handing back that Hale contract [Signed C.H. Brooks]


London; Dear Lewis, I have just received a letter from Duell, who tells me that he has received the manuscript of [Signed C.H. Brooks]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, We are enclosing herewith our cheque for [pounds] 130. We are entering in our records [Signed Anthony Heath]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Thank y ou for your letter of the 16th. Mr. Brooks is still away on holiday, and Mr. Hale is also [Signed Anthony Heath]


London; Dear Lewis, I am afraid I must protest in a friendly way against your annoyance with A.M. Heath & Co. [Signed C.H. Brooks]


London; Dear Lewis, Having tried, without success, to get you on the telephone, I write to say that we have heard fromGoverts [Signed C.H. Brooks]


London; Dear Lewis, You asked for a statement of the money situation and I am sending you one herewith. [Signed C.H. Brooks]


London; Dear Lewis, For some time Hale has been periodically enquiring regarding the typescript of your novel, [Signed C.H. Brooks]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I have made a number of attempts to get in touch with you but have been thwarted [Signed C.H. Brooks]


London; Dear Lewis,I have confirmed that THE APES OF GOD, in the edition published by Grayson & Grayson, [Signed C.H. Brooks]


London; Dear Lewis, We have an enquiry for the French rights in REVENGE FOR LOVE. If you could let us have a copy [Signed C.H. Brooks]


London; Dear Lewis, We have a publisher asking to see TARR and WILD BODY with a view to publishing a French translation. [Signed C.H. Brooks]


London; Dear Lewis, Have you by any chance been able to get hold of the copies of TARR and WILD BODY, for which the French [Signed C.H. Brooks]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, "Time" magazine wrote to us this morning as follows:- "I am writing to request permission [Signed Hethe Nuthrown]


London; Dear MMadam: We are publising this week DISCUSSIONS OF THE NOVEL, edited by Roger Sale. [Signed Marie L. Edel]


Turnbridge Wells, Kent; Dear Lewis, I was so sorry that I could not come to your private views but I was having a hectic time


Turnbridge Wells, Kent; Dear Lewis, I have not heard from you but I hope H. & Co. are dealing with your book


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Very many thanks for sending me 'America and Cosmic Man'. and for the charmingly wicked dedication!


London; My dear Lewis, We have been very much of of touch but I hope we can meet after Christmas. I send you my best wishes


Paris; Dear Mr. Lewis- I'm awfully sorry not to have gotten your note until about an hour ago. Could you eat lunch with me tomorrow,


Paris; Dear Mr. Lewis, I've just received your letter sent to Cape on June 30 - and by them forwarded to Titus's book shop.


New York; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis. While on the crest of a tremendous wave of enthusiasm after reading your "Time & Western Man"


Marlow; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis. I was so pleased to receive your letter & kind invitation & will certainly call for you


Marlow; Herewith the copy of "Antiquity" I promised you with the article by Collingwood on Spengler.


Marlow; Dear Mr. Lewis. I'm wondering if you have skipped off to the United States without bidding me good-bye.


Coker Court, Yeovil; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis/ Thank you so much for your nice letter. I should have loved to have come


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I don't know if you remember me and our common evening with Joachim Moras at Berlin


Washington,D.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis: That part of your book which appeared recently in the American Review was fine indeed.


Hitchin, Hertshire; My dear Edward, Many thanks for managing with Mr. Wyndham Lewis to draw (coloured) my family of 5


Carnforth; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis- This is going to be a very childish letter Im afraid. I have wanted to write you for about three years,


Carnforth; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis- Your letter came this morning and made me very happy. But I see you think I am the parson's wife-


Carnforth; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis- Thank you for being so nice and having me to tea - which must have been an awful bore for you.


Paris; Madame, Nous allons publier a l'Herne un Cahier consacre a Wyndham Lewis, et j'aimerais savoir si vous


Lucerne; We intend to publish a book about modern painting "The moderns and their world" by the end of this year. [for Kunstkreis]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, May I express on behalf of my wife + myself our deepest sympathy with you at this time? [With AL[draft] by G. Anne in reply on verso.]


Glasgow; Dear Mr. lewis, I write to you without introduction because I wish to approach the B.B.C. with the idea of adapting your play,


Londonderry; Dear Francis, I was reading through some old letters from Marjorie Firminger, and a point arose about which


Kyremia, Cyprus; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, As a result of reading your sad 'Swan Song' in "The Listener", I have felt imprelled


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, D.G. Bridson - THE FILIBUSTER/ This is to confirm the terms already agreed between you and D.G. Bridson [Signed Bruce Hunter]


Gambier, Ohio; Dear Mr. Lewis: I feel rather timid writing you this letter. For some time I have read and admired greatly your work


St. Louis; My dear Mr. Lewis,- I believe that you will be much happier and more comfortable in another studio.


London; Two Sunday Times letters about "as an Enemy" in the paper, [with regard to Lewis]


Manchester; Dear Sir- In your book Blasting & Bombarding and also in Rude Assignment you mention your drawings as being in "Manchester Museum".


Uckfield; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I feel that I do not want to let the time pass without saying how very sorry I was to read the sad news


Sussex; My dear Wyndham Lewis, Through various members of my family I heard of the misfortune of your losing your eyesight.


Sussex; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I just want to let you know that I spent some 6 days with my daughter at Bromley


Sussex; My dear Wyndham Lewis, Robin Denny, student at St. martin's School of Art & third son of the Rev. Pi Henry Denny


Sheffield; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Since leaving your flat I have not made the progress anticipated in getting round the rooms I have to see


London; Dear Froanna, [11 letters from Hirst to Lewis]


London; Dear Madam, I am at present engaged in pictorial research for our magazine HISTORY OF THE 20th CENTURY, [Signed Jasmine Gale]


Malaga; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis. Owing to my having left England for Spain almost immedicately after the recording of "Tarr"


Colabete; Dear Mrs.Wyndham Lewis. I have had a card from Pickford & they will be fetching your things on Sat.


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I shall be editing and illustrating a volume of selected humourous writings for Ivor Nicholson and Watson,


Irvington, NJ; Dear Mr. Lewis: Geoffrey Stone forwarded your letter on Nov.21, thanking us for helping you to "limp" out of our country.


Essex; Dear Madam. The enclosed correspondence has been handed to me by the present tenant of your former flat. [Included is a second ALS from Haggard to Lewis, dated Jan.5, 1971.]


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, I am writing to ask whether you could possibly help me. With the permission of the family


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Having looked up my letter from Cornell, I find it was an authoratative one after all, [With TLS Cornell University Library, Department of Rare Books to Holroyd, dated Mar.27, 1969.]


New York; Dear Lewis: I am very glad indeed to get your recent letter and to know that your article had arrived at the Sewanee Review. [Signed Allen Tate]


New York; Dear Lewis, I was extremely glad to get yours of July 23rd. I have not yet seen your article on DeTocqueville [Signed Allen Tate]


New York; Dear Lewis: Please send me as soon as you can the galleys of your book about the United States. [Signed Allen Tate]


New York; Dear Lewis: The page proofs of AMEICA AND COSMIC MAN arrived about ten days ago [Signed Allen Tate]


New York; Dear Lewis, I am very pleased and relieved to get your letter of September 26th. I am looking forward [Signed Allen Tate]


New York; Dear Lewis: Very glad to get yours of Nov.13; but sorry the new book has been held up. In 1942 I swore never to get on the radio again [Signed Allen Tate]


New York; Dear Lewis, Weren't you going to send me the manuscript of your new book sometime in December? [Signed Allen Tate]


New York; Away July 4 to 21 but send book at once. [Signed Allen Tate]


New York; My dear Lewis, I have your letter of June 23 which was followed bery closely by the manuscript of THE POLITICS OF THE INTELLECT. [Signed Allen Tate]


New York; Dear Lewis: I am very unhappy about this. It is a very powerful and moving book, but we should have to sell it for at least $5.50 [Signed Allen Tate]


New York; Tate Gallery requires we obtain your permission to reproduce in color Ezra Pound by W. Lewis in High School textbook


Glasgow; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis. I have been sick hence this belated note of sympathy. The death of your husband brings sorrow and regrets


Glasgow; My dear Lewis, Your cable came to me as a great surprise, and explains the silence subsequent to my London visit.


Glasgow; Dear Lewis, Your letter of September 13th took some time to reach me, and I am replying immediately.


Glasgow; My dear Wyndham Lewis, This in reply to your letter of October 4th, received an hour ago. The war is considerably delaying the mail,


Glasgow; My dear Lewis, This in reply to your letter dated October 5th. Please put mor water in the whiskey, because in addition to putting the wrong date


Glasgow; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I am delighted to hear from you and to know at first hand that you are still very much in the land of the living [With ALS reply to Honeyman from Lewis, 15 Oct. 1947.]


Glasgow; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I am very sorry that my London visit will have to be postponed till next month.


New York; Dear Mr. Giovanelli: This is to apply for permission to handle translation rights in Lewis' AMERICA AND COSMIC MAN.


Ashford; Dear Mr. Lewis, To intrude upon the time of an industrious writer merely to praise is not a habit which I personally favour.


Kensington; Dear Gladys. at last I am writing to you and hope you are quite well/ you would not know Kensington now [With TL transcription included.]


Lonbridge; Dear Anne. I received your letter on my return from Devon last Sat. Denise became engaged on Easter Sunday [With two ALS to Lewis from writers' daughters.]


Boston; Dear Sirs, May we reproduce in a college reader (British Poetry and Prose) the painting of T.S. Eliot by Wyndham Lewis? [Signed Myra W. Pearl]


Boston; Dear Mr. Lewis, Thank you very much for your prompt reply and attention to our request for permission to reproduce [Signed Myra W. Pearl]


Boston; Dear Mr. Lewis, We are taking the later portrait after all. Your photograph is so much better than the reproduction [Signed Myra W. Pearl]


Hollywood; Dear Mr. Lewis. I find myself compelled to peck out a letter to you in gratitude for the superb book "American and Cosmic Man."


Dear Sirs, In reply to your letter addressed to Lord Howard de Walden, his Lordship desires me to say that he entirely fails to understand [Signed A.N. Tellingham]


Penark; Dear W. Lewis, Thank you very much for your kind letter: as soon as I return to town I will choose something of yours


New York; [Royalty statement for "America I Presume"]


New York; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I've tried hard to find a way to overcome the time lag involved in American publication of THE HITLER CULT, [Signed William Soskin]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis: I am enclosing two copies of the contract, both of which you are to sign, if you find the form in order. [Signed William Soskin]


New York; Dear Lewis, I think the manuscript is amusing. There are certain matters to watch, I believe, chiefly because the entire book [Signed William Soskin]


New York; Dear Lewis: Weeks apparently didn't take to the piece for the ATLANTIC MONTHLY. I have therefore sent it over to ESQUIRE [Signed William Soskin]


New York; Dear Lewis: I have word from Philip Wittenberg, our firm's lawyer, that this is no need to worry in the slightest[Signed William Soskin]


New York; Dear Lewis: I am forwarding to you a letter I received today from Thayer Hobson, together with an enclosure [Signed William Soskin]


New York; Dear Giovanelli: Would you be kind enough to send via air mail to Stanislaus Joyce, 13 via Fabio Severo, Trieste, Italy, the carbon [Signed Joseph Bennett]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis: Peter Russell suggested to me that you might be willing to do us an article on painting in England. [Signed Frederick Morgan]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis, At Hugh Kenner's request, we are sending you a copy of our Autumn issue, [Signed Frederick Morgan]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis, Many thanks for your kind letter, and for sending us the chapters from "Monstre Gai." I'm very delighted [Signed Frederick Morgan]


East Blue Hill, Maine; Dear Mr. Lewis: Many thanks for your kind letters of the 4th and 17th; I should have answered sooner, [Signed Frederick Morgan]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis, My apoligies for not having written sooner: we have been giving thought to how best to present [Signed Frederick Morgan]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis, I have been meaning to write you for the last month, to tell you that the review copy of SELF CONDEMNED [Signed Frederick Morgan]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis, Many thanks for sending me the introductory note to "Monstre Gai"; it arrived in good time [Signed Frederick Morgan]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis, Just a note to let you know that the piece by Mr. Eliot, entitled "A Note on "Monstre Gai"", arrived safely [Signed Frederick Morgan]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis, Two or three days ago we sent you galley proofs of the first section of "Monstre Gai". [Signed Frederick Morgan]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis, I enclose the proof on the second section of "Monstre Gai." We will check it very carefully [Signed Lisa Dyer]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis, I see by the papers that the Aldington book on T. E. Lawrence has just been published in England. [Signed Frederick Morgan]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis, I don't like to add to your labors, but Lawrence's "The Mint" is about to be published over here, [Signed Frederick Morgan]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis, I am happy indeed to learn from your last letters that you are pleased with our Winter issue, [Signed Frederick Morgan]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis, I have been laid up briefly this past week, or I should have answered more promptly your kind letters [Signed Frederick Morgan]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis, I take plesure in enclosing your check for the second section of "Monstre Gai," published in our Spring issue. [Signed Frederick Morgan]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis, It has been some time since I have last written. I trust you have had a pleasant summer, and that all goes well. [Signed Frederick Morgan]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis, In reply to your radiogram, yes - Nov. 1 will be in plenty of time. In fact, a week later would still be all right. [Signed Frederick Morgan]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis, Many thanks for the additional review of the Armitage book. It will round out the group very nicely, [Signed Frederick Morgan]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis: The managing editor was unable to acknowledge receipt of your manuscript as she has just [Signed Nancy Smith]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis- We were extremely interested & impressed by the opening chapters of "The Red Priest." [Signed Frederick Morgan]


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis, Herewith our check for your review in the Winter issue; I hope your copies have reached you [Signed Lisa Dyer; with not from Morgan at the end.]


New York; Dear Mrs. Lewis: Many thanks for your kind letter of June 2. It is certainly a tragedy that your husband did not live [Signed Frederick Morgan]


London; My dear Lewis, Here is a copy of my letter to the [self-itinerant dissident?] of Richard Brinsky Sheridan


London; Dear Lewis, A painter who is a common acquaintance of our told me some six months ago that you were back


Chexbres, Switzerland; My dear Lewis, My impression of last year is confirmed by this second visit: Chexbres (or rather all that one sees


London; My dear Lewis. My plans have been upset to day, as I have just received a wire saying that my mother is coming


London; Dear Lewis. I am sorry I missed you to-night. I came in ten minutes after you called. I shall be in to-morrow


London; Dear Lewis. I have spoken to the publisher "Howard Latimer" about the prosed review. They are quite ready to take it.


Dear Sir. Having read 'Hitler Cult' with admiration & enjoyment, I am wondering if you would care to glance at analysis


London; Dear Lewis. Don't be so unkind to me. Between you & Ford, Blakesley I am between the devil & two deep seas.


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis. I am writing a tesis on Wyndham Lewis' painting between the wars. Would it be possible to meet you


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis.[Three ALS Humphreys to Lewis on visits to Lewis.]


Surrey; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, You may remember I met you some years ago and was in touch with your husband [Draft of Hutchins article included.]


Surrey; Dear Mrs. Lewis, When dealing with the relationship between Thomas Hardy and Ezra Pound, outlined in the enclosed, [Outline included.]


Surrey; Dear Mrs. Lewis, In May you very kindly gave me permission to quote from a letter by your husband in an article


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, With the help of Miss Harriet Weaver I have recently been studying the files of "The Egoist,"


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, You may remember that last year I asked your permission to quote a letter written to James Joyce


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I am sorry to trouble you again but I have written an article for New World Writing in the U.S.


Dear Mr. Underwood, Thank you for your letter of 20th February regarding articles found in the flat of the late Wyndham Lewis,


Cambridge; Dear Wyndham Lewis- Our old acquaintance which looks now rather like Johnny-

lead-in-ars's book -


Chichester; Dear Wyndham Lewis. I have sent you off a wire to ask you to have your pictures sent on to A. Worlet,


Hammersmith; Dear Wyndham Lewis. I went down to the Tat to see about "Laughing Women:, but unfortunately it was larger


[n.p.] Dear Mr. Schiff. The Contemporary Art Society Committee have decided to extend their activities to the purchase of modern foreign pictures


London; Dear Mr. Schiff, Many thanks for your letter. I am afraid I can't agree with your criticisms, as I find in the history of Art


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, You probably don't remember me. I came to see you with the Swiss painter Oscar Dalvit


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Herewith the last three proofs set in page size for caption writing, as promissed. [Signed R. Jnape]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I am sorry that I was not available when you telephoned this morning. [Signed K. H. Webb]


London; Dear Sir, We herewith enclose the agreement duly signed by Mr. Hutchinson, for your work entitled "Story of a Career". [Signed I. de Borries]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I enjoyed our lunch enormously but I was sorry it was a poor one for you! [Signed F. W. Heath]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, As arranged on the telephone this morning, I am returning to you herewith all the material [Signed K. H. Webb]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Our Legal Adviser has now returned the manuscript of your "ASCENT OF PARNASSUS", [Signed K. H. Webb]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Your replies to our Legal Adviser's report were duly submitted, and I enclose you a copy of his reply. [Signed K. H. Webb]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I am returning herewith your book "AMERICA I PRESUME". In veiw of the great hold-up [Signed K. H. Webb]


London; Dear Lewis, Sorry to worry you. I am writing a number of catalogue notes. Do you think you could send me one [Signed K. H. Webb]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Enclosed are your drawings for the jacket design of your book, RUDE ASSIGNMENT. [Signed Ken Williamson]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, RUDE ASSIGNMENT/ Further to my telephone call this morning I am enclosing proofs [Signed R. Jnape]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, RUDE ASSIGNMENT/ I notice in the list of captions that there is no title for the attached picture, [Signed R. Jnape; picture included]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I enclose a revised proof of the jacket for your book Rude Assignment together [Signed Ken Williamson]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, [Three letters dealing with "Rude Assignment" from three different people working at Hutchinson]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, In reply to your telegram of today's date, I enclose herewith a copy of your book. [Signed K. C. Bensill]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I must apolgise for the delay in replying to your letter. I was rather surprised to learn[Signed K. H. Webb; including list of newspapers where they sent "Rude Assignment"]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I understand that you are anxious to know the sales of RUDE ASSIGNMENT and I am sending [Signed K. H. Webb]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, You will no doubt remember I wrote to you some little time ago referring to the agreement [Signed K. H. Webb]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I wrote to you on the 14th of September and since I have had no reply I thought the letter [Signed K. H. Webb]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Thank you for your letter of the 3rd of October. I am very glad to learn that ROTTING HILL is not [Signed K. H. Webb]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I am sorry to learn from your letter just to hand that the book which we commissioned [Signed K. H. Webb]


London; Dear Sir, We are proposing to accept an offer for the remainder stock of your RUDE ASSIGNMENT, [Signed T. O. Kunz]


London; Dear Lewis, Miss Todd is anxious to reproduce one or two of your drawings with an article in this paper. [On Vogue letterhead.]


London; Dear Lewis, If there's no violent hurry for the MS, I'll let you have something by the end of next week.


London; Dear Lewis, I enclose an article which I hope will do for the paper. I hear from Prentice that you are thinking


London; Dear Sir, The Imperial College, which is the largest school of the Unicersity of London in the Faculty of Science, [Signed I. Berenblut]


London; Dear Mr. Wydham Lewis, You may have heard that the War Artists' Advisory Committee was disbanded on 31st December last. [Signed L. R. Frawley]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, The Institute of Contemporary Arts will be holding a discussion meeting entitled "The Strange Case of Abstract Art" [Signed Ewan Phillips]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Further to our letter of 27th February, I very much hope that you will be able to be present [Signed Ewan Phillips]


[n.p.] [Christmas card signed Mr. & Mrs. Alec Instone]


Toronto; Dear Sir: We have received at our Copper Cliff plant a letter from Rielle Thomson, Director General of the Publicity Branch [Signed J. C. Nicholls]


Middlesex; Dear Mrs. Lewis, In the next BOOKMAN, we are reviewing a new book and re-editions of older publications [Signed Joan Rodker]


Glasgow; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Amongst the drawings in my possession is the one I enclose by Mr. Wyndham Lewis.


Glasgow; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Thank you very much for answering my query about the drawing. I am most interested to hear


London; Dear Sirs, Mr. Wyndham Lewis. I am in receipt of your letter of 29th January re your client, the above author. [Signed J.A.C. Roberts]


London; Dear Sirs, Mr. Wyndham Lewis. I am afraid it is impossible for me to say yes or no regarding what was sent to Mr. Lewis


London; Dear Sirs, Mr. Wyndham Lewis. I believe you have an outstanding query as to what the expression "pied up the type" means. [Signed J.A.C. Roberts]


London; Dear Sirs, Mr. Wyndham Lewis.With reference to your letter of 18th February and the points you raise in it, [Signed J.A.C. Roberts]


London; Dear Sirs, America and Cosmic Man. Mr. Wyndham Lewis.Thank you for your letter of 21 January. We are not clear as to your remarks


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I am getting rather concerned about the non-arrival of your manuscript and in particular of the blurb [Signed J.A.C. Roberts]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Prentic-Hall Incorporated have just written to us to say that their offer is still in the balance [Signed J.A.C. Roberts]


London; Please find enclosed six copies of AMERICA AND COSMIC MAN for sales promotion as arranged


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, We have to-day received an inquiry from the Thomas Morus Presse (im Verlag Harder), [Signed J.A.C. Roberts]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, We have pleasure in sending you a copy of THE WIND AND THE RAIN and in which [Signed J.A.C. Roberts]


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Sheila & Wilfred, Let me rapidly establish the fact that this is nothing but a note. I feel in no way inventive


New York; Dear Mrs. Lewis, Thank you for a perfectly delightful evening. We'ver scarcly enjoyed ourselves more


New York; Dear Lewis, Thanks so much for your note. I had your telephone number some time ago from the Tuscany


New York; Dear Mr. Lewis, It was a great pleasure to have your note, and something of a shock to know that you had seen the slight piece


Toronto; My dear Lewis, Glad you like Montreal. it has a lot of the rough edges worn off. as compared with Toronto.


Banff; My dear Lewis, Your letter was awaiting me when I arrived here three weeks ago. and since then I seem to have had no time


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Rober Graves will not be in London next week, or for several weeks after that. I'm pretty busy myself


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, This is so sudden. But would you mind coming here to tea: I am timid rather ill and just now very busy.


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Sorry: I overdrank about a fortnight ago and am now out of drinking order )temporarily);


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Since we are in agreement about lividity and time philosophy, will you not not come here some


Oxford; Dear Mr. Lewis, Thank you for your letter. I too have great respect for Virginia and Leonard Woolf


Islip; Dear Mr. Lewis, I did not send the ans. the same day as my letter because I decided to shorten it radically.


Islip; Insist on return of registered matter or courteous acknowledgment.


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I was in no particular hurry for the mss. but I suddenly decided you were the trunk murderer


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, Since you were frightened of me because I thought you were the trunk murderer, and I was


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, If you mean to use any of those poems I gave you some time, will you please let me know:


Deya, Mallorca; Dear Mr. Lewis, I am glad you liked my book and hope it continues to give comfort and profit.


London; Dear Mrs. Wyndham Lewis, Mr. Walter S. Michel of New York has informed me that you are now arranging


Cambridge, MA; Dear Mrs. Lewis: I am now back at my desk and remembering the hours you spent with me on your collection.


Cambridge, MA; My dear Mrs. Lewis: I have been trying to piece together my recollections of the numbers of letters that I saw


Washington, D.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis: After having got everything going smoothly with Paul Douglass and the American University,


Washington, D.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis: I think Joe Brewer of Olivet College is your best bet, and I have written him


Washington, D.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis: I hope that by now something has happened in connection with the proposed appointment.


Washington, D.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis: We are having bad luck. That, I suppose, is the vanity of trying to get a creative genius


Washington, D.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis: Many thanks for your long and interesting letter. The difficulties we are meeting with presidents


Washington, D.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis: Some time back President Keezer sent me carbons of a letter he had sent you and Dr. Dollard.


Washington, D.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis: I have heard nothing directly from President Keezer since I last wrote you.


London; Dear Mrs. Lewis, I received your note this morning and am very happy that you have amented to see me.


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, You were kind enough a little time ago to say that you would allow me to use the upper portion [Signed John Sibthorpe]


Paris; Chere, Ayant recu hier ta lettre


London; My dear Wyndham Lewis, We want to send out the enclosed letter under the signatures of a number of representative people


[n.p.] Dear Lewis, Forgetting you are a true Norman I sent a note some time ago - doubtless it decomposes mutely


[n.p.] Dear Lewis, I fear this comes too late but if not could you meet me at the six bells at 7. I shall be seated


[Paris] Dear Lewis- I hope you will avoid my carlessness and refrain from letting Dorelia know of Lamb's affair


Boston; Dear Lewis, What is your judgement of these lines: Earth's fruit hangs ruddy on the weary bough


Essex; Dear Lewis, At this distance aim must be uncertain but the shaft shall be drawn to the ear, and if it fly wide


London; Dear Lewis, You are quite right. Th' I have already written to the protagonist to ask if he will be at


London; Dear Lewis, I must apologize for taking you out of your way yesterday. I was very vague as to what was going to happen.


London; My dear Lewis, I'd like very much to see you & if you would ring me up we could arrange a meeting perhaps.


London; Dear Lewis, Thursday will do just as well and I will expect you then. When will you write an account


London; Dear Lewis, I am about to leave for Ireland and am much pressed. Will you come & lunch here at 1.30 to-day


Paris; Dear Lewis, Me voici revenu. Will you come to-morrow and we will have dinner somewhere out, en famille.


Paris; Dear Lewis, Whether the nubritive female or whether the disruptive male has it, must at the last upshot be for the decision of


[n.p.] Percy Wyndham Lewis. Renouncing the illusions I have nouished (with my heart's blood) for years, and amongst them


Dorset; Dear Lewis, As you see, I'm away form town and though coming back to-morrow fear I shall be to late [torn into two pieces]


[Paris] I wish I had your note intact to send you back - you would, I think admit no more offensive document could be penned


London; Dear Lewis, Could you post me at once some observations which I could inset into those I already have got written


Dorset; Dear Lewis, I went on Saturday to see your picture. On entering that building I was immediately joined


Dorset; Dear Lewis, Sorry I found no opportunity to call upon you during my last short visit to London. I hope you'll be in town


[London] My poor Lewis, I as distressed to hear of your persistent illness. I hasten to send a word, vous


London; Mon cher, I leave for Paris to-morrow. Events have followed with admirable briskness. After the Ear incident,


Cherbourg; Hope to get to Dielette in two or 3 days. Dieletter is a pretty place and I count on going for some walking.


Villa Ste. Anne; My dear Lewis, Very delighted with your letter & poem. The latter very beautiful & impressing.


[Paris] Dear Lewis, I thought it as well to quit London rather suddenly - several friends who have my well-being at heart


London; Dear Lewis, I have given myself plenty of time to reflect on your drawing & letter. In the latter you appear, however,


London; Dear Lewis, I must apologize for being so stupid yesterday. I must have been positively drunk to assume so ridiculously


London; Dear Lewis, I should much like to meet you and Wadsworth again before long. As I told you I was going to write


London; My dear Lewis, I didn't ask for any corroborative evidence of your row with Fry. You assumed in your hard head


H.Q. Canadian; Dear Lewis, Not having heard from you I felt my letter didn't reach you. In my ignorance I may have


H.Q. Canadian; My dear Lewis, Let me know how to find you & I'll run over at once. I'm installed now in a chateau


London; Dear Lewis, I dined with Beaverbrook last night, one of his creatures General Sims being present.


Dorset; Dear Lewis, Here, somewhat late, is the testimonial to Bobby. I hope it will serve. Have you any news of your movement


Dorset; I have known the work of William Roberts for some years & consider him to be an artist of great talent [The testimonial spoken of in folder 31.]


London; My dear Lewis, Thank you for sending your address. I wanted to write to you to say how very greatly I admire your book


London; Dear Lewis, Did you recover the book from the Norske Klub? Let me know when we dine together again.


London; My dear Lewis, Upon returning from France I found you new book "The Lion in the Box" you have very kindly sent me


London; Dear Lewis, I get enquiries re Sheen's "God & Intelligence" and "l'Etude Companie des Religions". I'm not sure if you borrowed


London; Dear Lewis, Not hearing from you for so long I was wondering if you had returned to America. We depart to-morrow


London; Dear Lewis, I am very sorry I was late (not more than a quarter of an hour I think). I understood the appointment was for 5.30.


London; Dear Lewis, Next Tuesday will do & I will come for you on the last occasion only when we met, you found


London; Dear Lewis, Stanley Mercer is a bleary idiot. Constance Lambert's telephone address is Holburn 2552.


London; My dear Lewis, Thanks very much for so kindly sending me your new book which I find on returning from the country.


Martiques, France; My dear Lewis, Very many thanks for "The Wild Body". I remember "Bestre". I have just packed my family off


Martiques, France; My dear Lewis, I wish you would send the next "Enemy" here where I expect to be for perhaps a month


Martiques, France; My dear Lewis, Glad to hear from you. I was afraid you had gone over to America or something dreadful of that sort.


Fordingbridge; My dear Lewis, I arrived back here about a week ago, and expect to return to London shortly where I have some work to do.


London; Dear Lewis, Many thanks for "The Childermass" which I am plunging into with great interest. I'd greatly like to have an evening


Fordingbridge; Dear Lewis, In case you considered coming down here next Monday for the wedding I wish to say it would really be better


Renvyle, Eire; Back here my dear Lewis but no Apes awaiting me. There are some grand ones in Galway.


Renvyle, Eire; My dear Lewis, I received your fine gift of "The Apes of God" and thank you heartily. I wrote a letter for your use


Fordingbridge; Dear Lewis, I'm half-way through "Apes of God". Mais, c'est colossal mon vieux! I shall be in town next week.


Renvyle, Ireland; Dear Lewis, I will try & write you a letter for publication during the next few days. Yeats read me a letter


Renvyle, Eire; My dear Lewis, Many thanks for the pamphlet. It's very good reading. Your remarks in satire & fiction especially.


Isle of Islay; My dear Lewis, Enclosed a cutting you may or not have seen. Hommculi means little men, not enormous monsters


Fordingbridge; My dear Lewis, I got back from Paris yesterday & shall be in London soon I expect. I made some drawings of Ulysses.


Fordingbridge; Dear Lewis, Many thanks for sending me your article on Hitlerism and now the perfectly beastly thing from Evening Standard.


Fordingbridge; Dear Lewis, Too late I wrote to Sir Will asking to see first the letters of mine he had proposed to reproduce


Cadgwith; Dear Lewis, I'm sorry not to have had the chance to come up for a sitting having had visitors at Fryern & various jobs


Fordingbridge; Dear Lewis, I called on Wednesday thinking you'd like another sitting. I'm comingup to-night & could come round


Fordingbridge; Dear Lewis, I should think some sort of book might be made out of Henry's writings and I would be very glad of your help


London; Dear Lewis, I couldn't just now switch on to any new politico-artistic move being more than fully occupied preparing for my show


Fordingbridge; Dear Lewis, I read yesterday of the rejection of your picture by the R.A. This is the limit & I resign with gratitude to you


London; Dear Lewis, Many thanks for sending me your article for The Listener. It does me a lot of good to have such a generous


Chateau de Missery; Dear Lewis, Sorry to have missed you before leaving. I came to Verry's but a bit late and you had gone,


Fordingbridge; Dear Lewis, I received your letter of a while back and answered it almost at once but dissatisfied with what I had written


Fordingbridge; My dear Lewis, I was glad to get your letter to-day for I had been wondering so long what had become of you.


Fordingbridge; Dear Lewis, I mislaid your wire which was forwarded to me in Wales & have only just found it.


Fordingbridge; Dear Lewis, As my studio in London has been in the hands of work-men for over four months (after bomb damage)


Fordingbridge; Dear Lewis, I'm sorry we didn't meet the other day. I didn't come up on the day I expected on account of gas trouble


Mas de Galern; My dear Lewis, Le Cafe Robinson represents the Frenchman's idea of Robinson Crusoe's habitat.


St. Remy; Your letter with enclosures received. Many thanks. Will write this evening. Quite agree with what you say.


St. Remy; Dear Lewis, I read your article with great pleasure. I, of course, would never expect anything from you except your own personal expression


Fordingbridge; Dear Lewis, I hadn't time to go through my photographs before leaving; but there are one or two pictures in my studio


Fordingbridge; Dear Lewis, I was very glad to hear your voice on the air the other night. What you said was admirable and I know how true it was.


Fordingbridge; Dear Lewis, yes, contact seems difficult. If you had a 'phone it would have been better. I haven't been much in London


London; Will you meet this evening 6 o'clock same place, Ellis St. John


Mas de Galern, France; You will have received my answer to your registered letter. We are now at the Mas with a convenient restaurant at hand.


Fordingbridge; Dear Lewis, I can find very few photographs down here but send you these few which have never been published


St. Remy de Provence; Grand Hotel de Provence; Staying here, tho may not being ready.


Fordingbridge; Back but temporarily laid up. May beseeing you in a week.


Fordingbridge; Dear Lewis, A propos the cleaning operations at the N.G. These are apt to bring to light old disasters,


Fordingbridge; Dear Lewis, I'm very sorry you've been down with 'flu - my own favourite affliction. I have found the after effects


Fordingbridge; Dear Lewis, I was delighted to have your reply and will include the letter & poem as I so much wished to do.


Fordingbridge; Dear Lewis, While actively revising or rather re-writing my auto biographical fragments for a projected book,


Fordingbridge; My dear Lewis, I got your letter just before leaving town where I had been for some days. If only you were


Fordingbridge; Dear Lewis, In your generous reference to me in the Listener your mentioned Mantegna's spiritual proximity


Fordingbridge; Dear Lewis, Let me know when you have finished recreating. They have raked up a number of things of mine


Fordingbridge; Dear Lewis, I listened to the Childermass with immense excitement. It seemed to me very well done.


Fordingbridge; Dear Lewis, Having just read two works of yours - Rotting Hill & The Revenge for Love, I was first going to write


Fordingbridge; Dear Lewis, I read your 'short story' in The Listener with consternation. I hoped I would have heard from you before now


Fordingbridge; You didn't put your telephone number. Yes, Wolfit was truly splendid - and everybody. Will see you soon.


Fordingbridge; Dear Lewis, I became involved in a difficult portrait down here & have been incessantly at work on it for over two months.


Fordingbridge; Dear Lewis, I had to defer coming up to London but when I did I at once rang your number at Victoria:


Fordingbridge; Dear Lewis, I have just red 'Self Condemned' and was of course deeply impressed by it. Surely it is the finest book


Fordingbridge; My dear Lewis, I will be coming up to London very shortly & will let you know. The Hyde Park Halis is well known


Fordingbridge; Dear Lewis, I greatly enjoyed our meeting & would have been more punctual but for the vagaries of my taxi man.


Fordingbridge; Dear Lewis, Many congratulations on your late triump on the wireless. I hope the magnificent performance will be repeated.


Fordingbridge; Dear Lewis, Many thanks for your letter and advice about my hands. I would like to show them to your doctor


Fordingbridge; My dear Lewis, I kept the appointment you made for me. I liked the doctor very much; he gave me his advice


Fordingbridge; My dear Lewis, Thank you for your card. I've been much harassed lately or would have sought a meeting.


Fordingbridge; August away.


Alderney, Dorset; Dear Lewis. Yes indeed I do still want a cook but send him or her to Mallosall. How will you know him


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, I am writing to outline the terms on which I should be willing to handle your new illustrated quarterly [Signed John Lane]


London; Dear Mr. Lewis, I don't think I have any alterations to suggest in your article just now, but I will try to send you a proof [Signed Franc Whitaker]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, This is to confirm the conversatin which we had on Friday last about your illustrations [Signed G. Wren Howard]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, We should like to publish FOUT PLAY'S A JEWEL, and imagine that it will make a book [Signed G. Wren Howard]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, As long as you have indicated that one of the illustrations should appear on page 4 and that the one, [Signed G. Wren Howard]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I have done everything that I can to get LEFT WINGS OVER EUROPE favourably reviewed, [Signed Signed Rupert Hart-Davis]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I have to-day sent you under separate registered cover, the MS and two sets of proofs [Signed Rupert Hart-Davis]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, Many thanks for your letter. By all means let us discuss the spelling of Queen. Perhaps you will look in and see me [Signed Signed Rupert Hart-Davis]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I have read the autobiographical fragment, which I must say I enjoyed very much, [Signed G. Wren Howard]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, As arranged with you last week we submitted a set of proofs of THE ROARING QUEEN to our solicitor [Signed G. Wren Howard]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I am very sorry that my letter caused you so much dismay, but it was not written hastily,[Signed G. Wren Howard]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I am afraid that it will not help matters to continue this correspondence. I can only repeat [Signed G. Wren Howard]


London; Dear Mr. Wyndham Lewis, Alas, I find that our Publicity Department just hasn't got a photograph of T.E.L. [Signed Daniel George]


London; Dear Lewis, It is very pleasant to be making contact with you again after so many years and I hope you are well.


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I am sending you this note with the cheque because I find on my return to this office [On The Newspaper Society letterhead]


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I am very sorry that I shall have to cry-off over meeting for tomorrow because I am going to have an operation


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I feel that I have treated you abominably over the last few weeks but I have had a very worrying domestic difficulties


London; Dear Wyndham Lewis, I am now writing to take up one or two matters with you and I think that I must apologise


Cambridge; My dear Mr. Lewis, It was extremely kind of you to grant me an interview last week. I am sure that having tea with you


Paris; Dear Sirs, We are interested, for possible translation into French, in TARR by Wyndham Lewis recently published by your firm. [Signed Pierre Javet]


New York; [5 letters signed by Conrad Brenner plus 7 royalty statements for "Tarr" and "The Vulgar Streak", 1974 editions]


Tonbridge; [Letters to "Auntie Anne"; 5 letters and two Christmas cards.]


[n.p.] [Rev. F. A. Kahler's address at the funeral of George Howard Lewis.]


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, To do honour to a possionate regard for language but not for mere virtuosity, to a concern less for words


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, Several days ago I wrote you a letter (dated May 27), and although you will scarcely have time to answer it by now


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, Thank you very much for your letter. Since a considerable part of the funds are in the United States,


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, My letter of June 16, written rather hurriedly, should reach you Friday (tomorrow).


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, I trust you will have received the short note which I left on Monday to be posted from the C.P.R. hotel.


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, With my enthusiasm at a high pitch and my physical vitality at a low ebb, I have not dealt as succinctly as I might


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, I am glad to say that I expect by next week to have more definite news regarding the date of my arrival


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, Dear Mr. Lewis: Herewith I am sending the first fair copy of the play. I hope it meets


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, Yesterday, by registered parcel-post, I sent you the first fair copy of my play.


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, Thank you for your kind wishes regarding my health, and for your interest in the play.


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, This will acknowledge, rather belatedly, your letter of the 21st. Miss West has just appeared


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, I am now well enough to cope with some of our business again, but we are all rather swept off our feet


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, We have been extremely busy for the last few days, but the situation is now well in hand.


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, Thank you for your letter of August 17. You will by now have received my letter


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis: Enclosed herewith is a note on some of the questions engaging me at the moment.


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, I am herewith submitting the following recommendations, which we are prepared to execute


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, Thank you for your letter of August 21. It is very kind of you to offer to provide a guarantee;


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, The two letters enclosed herewith were written prior to my receipt of your last note,


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, Herewith I am enclosing some figures, and a rather long note, written yesterday,


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, I had very little time, on receiving your letter yesterday, to write a proper reply.


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, This will acknowledge your letter of Monday August 24, which has just arrived. [With "Guarantee" document.]


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, I'm sorry I couldn't write you a more definite and explanatory letter yesterday. By the time you receive this,


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, I fear that I have offended you, but as the affront was unintentional, I am not certain wherein I most offended.


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, Since receiving your two most recent letters, I have been attempting to work out some alternative


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, Please forgive the delay in answering your letter of the 3rd. The office was closed over the Labour-day


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, Although there has not yet been time for me to receive a reply to my letter of the 10th,


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, This is just a brief note to acknowledge immediately your letter of the 13th in anwer to mine of the 10th.


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, To define, as you said, the practical aspects of the plans envisaged in your last letter;


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, This will acknowledge with thanks your letter of Sunday the 20th, which arrived this morning.


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, Our letters unavoidably have been crossing in flight, which may have led to a little seeming-confusion


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, I hope my letter posted last night, with its rather complicated outline of residential facilities


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, I am answering at once your two letters of Sept. 30 and Oct. 1., which both arrived this afternoon.


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, By the time you receive this, you will have had my letter and telegram, both sent last night.


Vancouver, B.C.; Am aware urgent and immediate necessity departure cheque stop transaction generally requires four days


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, I have just been downtown, and found waiting for me your letter of Oct. 2., which arrived this afternoon.


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, Our conversation on Sunday was not, I know, in a medium suited for an extensive discussion,


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, Thank you for your letter of the 16th., which reached me on Monday; I should have answered


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, As I mentioned in my note of the 21st., I would not for a little while have very much to report


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, I am afraid that after my recent silence I must appear to your minds's eye rather like a


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, I am sorry not to have written you for so long, and feel that some explanations are due.


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, During the past four years I have been attempting to learn your whereabouts, but until recently


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, Thank you very much for your letter, which I received yesterday afternoon. It arrived three


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, The newspapers during the last few days have been filled with accounts of the heightening economic crisis


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, You will perhaps have read of the Canadian meat strikes, which began last week,


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, Thank you for your registered letter of the 20th, which my wife obtained at the Post Office


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, My kindest thanks for your letter of Sept.29th, which arrived on the weekend. Before passing on to other matters,


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, I had intended that my next letter to you should be the outline which I have been drafting;


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, (Please read postscript after p.19, first). Your extremely interesting and charming letters [Postscript was written on November 26, 1947.]


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, Today I write again, as I have some news (not very much, but good, I hope, about Simpsons;


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, Looking again through the carbons of my correspondence - something that I am now obliged to do


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, Should all go well, I shall be posting the outline to-morrow or Monday, and the excerpts


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, Thank you for your letter posted on December 15, which arrived yesterday. I was extremely sorry to learn


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, There are a great many things that I wish to discuss in this letter, but as I wish to post it tonight,


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, When I began the Thursday part of my last letter, too much of the evening was gone


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, When it is uncertain to what extent a letter may grow, and (or yet)* when I wish to post it


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, One of the monsignors, in a Homburg in fact, went to Miss Robertson's on Wednesday


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, All my best thanks for your letter of the 13th, which came yesterday. It is very interesting,


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, My last letter, sent registered Saturday, started off I fear a bit dolefully, embarrassedly rather,


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, The typewriter, much to my amazement, was ready for me to bring home yesterday.


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, The material which I airmailed on Saturday will form, I believe, about a tenth or more of the book;


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, A short note, mainly about parcels, notably the air-express butter. When we ordered it,


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, Today sent a further parcel, 19 lb, and a smaller one, 11 1/2 - latter mainly flour and milk, and some yeast.


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, This is just a note about the butter by air situation, which is now cleared up.


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, We got back to Vancouver on Thursday the 7th; I meant to write you as soon as we returned,


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, In answer to your letter of Oct. 9th, received during the consummation of my second epistle


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, Dispatched butter the Feb. 23rd but otherwise have hardly been out of doors since my last letter.


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, Just a short parcels-note before stopping work for the day. I have not been out for several days,


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, New troubles and complications have developed delaying the transfer of our studio


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, Two events yesterday, in pleasant contrast with all this week's and last's vexed and tiring business


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, [Text on first page covered over by pasted newspaper [?] picture of Vancouver.]


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, We had a very agreeable time on the Island, though things did not turn out as we expected.


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, A note in some haste. We have just finished packing a parcel, and after I have typed this,


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, Thank you for your note of the 26th, which arrived late yesterday afternoon. I am glad to report


Vancouver, B.C.; Dear Mr. Lewis, Thank you for your note postmarked Dec. 20th, which arrived just today. Canada has had this year


Loaned as part of the exhibition "The Vorticists: Rebel Artists in London and New York, 1914-1918"


Includes item loaned as part of the exhibition "The Vorticists: Rebel Artists in London and New York, 1914-1918": Manifesto disassociating its members from Futurism, Rebel Art Centre, London.


Loaned as part of the exhibition "The Vorticists: Rebel Artists in London and New York, 1914-1918"


Includes three items loaned as part of the exhibition "The Vorticists: Rebel Artists in London and New York, 1914-1918": card invitation to the private view of the First Vorticist Exhibition, Dore Galleries, London, June 10, 1915, card invitation to "Vital English Art" lecture by F. T. Marinetti and C. R. W. Nevinson, The Dore Galleries, London June 1, 1914, card invitation to a "Blast" dinner, Dieudonne Restaurant London, July 15, 1914.