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I. Correspondence, 1905-1943. [series]:
The correspondence of the American Association for Labor Legislation (AALL) consists largely of exchanges between John B. Andrews, executive secretary of the Association from 1909 until his death in 1943, and various political figures, union officials, scholars, and social activists, all interested in the activities of the Association.

Included are personal letters of Andrews; outgoing letters of active members of the Association, including Irene Osgood Andrews, John R. Commons, Elizabeth Brandeis and Joseph P. Chamberlain; incoming AALL correspondence; press releases; and correspondence of the state branches of the AALL and other branch organizations. The records also include letters pertaining to the inception in 1906 of the AALL; letters written during the 38 years that the Association championed the cause of labor; finally, letters that reflect the diminishing activity of the Association and its financial difficulties, ending with the death of Andrews. Significant subjects discussed are child labor laws, coal mining safety regulations, compulsory arbitration, free employment agencies, health insurance, mediation, mine safety, occupational diseases, old age benefits, public works, social security, unemployment insurance, vocational rehabilitation, workmen's compensation, and yellow dog contracts.

 
A. Correspondence, 1905-1910. [subseries]:
 
1. Correspondence (A-H), 1905-1910. [subseries]:
Include correspondence relating to the formation and early administration of the American Association for Labor Legislation (AALL); to relations of the AALL with the International Association for Labor Legislation; to fund raising; to the Association's desire to investigate occupational diseases and poisons; to the establishment of state chapters; to a study of phosphorus poisoning ("phossy jaw"); to a workmen's compensation campaign in New York; to the Illinois 10-hour law; to pension systems; to changes in legislation in regard to occupational hazards, insurance, employment office regulations, and child labor; and to a contributory workmen's compensation insurance plan. Major correspondents include John B. Andrews, Louis D. Brandeis, John R. Commons, Miles M. Dawson, Edward T. Devine, Richard T. Ely, Henry W. Farnam, Henry B. Favill, Josephine C. Goldmark, Samuel Gompers, and Alice Hamilton.

Other individual and organizational correspondents of national significance or who wrote with some frequency include the following with names beginning with the letters A-H: Jane Addams; Felix Adler; Amalgamated Association of Street and Electric Railway Employees of America; American Economic Association; J. Mahlon Barnes (National Secretary, Socialist Party); Stephen Bauer (General Secretary, International Association for Labor Legislation); James D. Beck (Commissioner, Wisconsin Bureau of Labor and Industrial Statistics); Sophonisba P. Breckinridge; Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers; Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen; Robert W. Bruere (General Agent, New York Association for Improving the Condition of the Poor); Committee of One Hundred on National Health, of the American Association for the Advancement of Science; John L. Coulter (University of Minnesota); Edgar T. Davies (Chief, Illinois State Factory Inspectors). Additional correspondents include Davis Rich Dewey; Mary E. Dreier (President, New York Women's Trade Union League); Crystal Eastman (Secretary, New York State Commission on Employers Liability and Causes); Irving Fisher (President, Committee of One Hundred of the Association for the Advancement of Science); John A. Fitch; Lucia O. Ford; Lee K. Frankel; S.M. Franklin (Secretary, National Women's Trade Union League); Ernst Freund; John P. Frey (International Moulders); Andrew Furuseth (Sailors' Union of the Pacific); Charles F. Gettemy (Director, Massachusetts Bureau of Statistics); John M. Glenn (Secretary and Director, Russell Sage Foundation); Nathan Glicksman; John Golden (President, United Textile Workers of America); Fred S. Hall (Secretary, Pennsylvania Child Labor Association); M.B. Hammond (Associate Professor, Ohio State University); C.A. Harper, M.D. (Secretary, Wisconsin Board of Health); G.W.W. Hanger (U.S. Bureau of Labor); Charles Harrington, M.D. (Secretary, Massachusetts State Board of Health); L.W. Hatch (Chief Statistician, New York State Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics); C.R. Henderson; Morris Hillquit; and Hull House.

 
2. Correspondence (I-W), 1905-1910. [subseries]:
Include correspondence relating to the formation and early administration of the American Association for Labor Legislation; relations of the Association with the International Association for Labor Legislation (IALL); fundraising; the Association's desire to investigate occupational diseases and poisons; the establishment of state chapters; the study of phosphorus poisoning ("phossy jaw"); a workmen's compensation campaign in New York; the Illinois 10-hour law; pension systems; changes in legislation in regard to occupational hazards; insurance; employment office regulations; child labor; and a contributory workmen's compensation insurance plan. Major correspondents include Arthur Kellogg, the National Child Labor Committee, Irene Osgood, Margaret D. Robins, and Adna F. Weber.

Other individual and organizational correspondents of national significance or who wrote with some frequency include the following with names beginning with letters I-W: Illinois State Federation of Labor; International Association for Labor Legislation; International Typographical Union; J.W. Jenks (professor, Cornell University); Frederick N. Judson; Florence Kelley; Paul U. Kellogg (Director, "Pittsburgh Survey", CHARITIES AND THE COMMONS); Robert Marion La Follette; Samuel McCune Lindsay (Secretary, National Child Labor Committee); Max O. Lorenz, (Bureau of Labor and Industrial Statistics, State of Wisconsin); Owen R. Lovejoy (General Secretary, National Child Labor Committee); Roswell C. McCrea (Associate Director, The School of Philanthropy); W.E. McEwen (Labor Commissioner, Bureau of Labor, Industries and Commerce, Minnesota); Reuben McKitrick; Theodore Marburg; Helen Marot (Secretary, N.Y. Women's Trade Union League); Massachusetts Commission on Old Age Benefits; Massachusetts State Board of Health; H.V. Mercer (lawyer, Minneapolis, Minn.); Darwin J. Meserole (Managing Attorney, The Cooperative Law Company); Henry C. Metcalf (Tufts College, Department of Political Science); John Mitchell (Vice President, A.F. of L.); Edward A. Moseley (Secretary, Interstate Commerce Commission); National Consumers' League; Robert Wuest (Commissioner, National Metal Trades Association); Charles P. Neill (U.S. Commissioner of Labor); J. Pease Norton; and the Ohio Federation of Labor.

Other correspondents include Paul S. Pierce (assistant professor, State University of Iowa); Jessica B. Peixotta (assistant professor, University of California); John W. Plaisted (Secretary, Industrial Relations Committee, Boston Chamber of Commerce); C.R. Richards (Columbia University, Secretary, National Society for the Promotion of Industrial Education); I.M. Rubinow; Russell Sage Foundation; Mary R. Sanford (member, Executive Committee of the Intercollegiate Socialist Society); Sophy Sanger (Honorary Secretary, British Association for Labor Legislation); Margaret R. Schaffner; Louis B. Schram; F. Charles Schwedtman (Consulting Electrical & Mechanical Engineers); Henry R. Seager; Warren S. Stone (Grand Chief, Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers); SURVEY; Wiley Swift (Secretary, National Child Labor Committee); Frank W. Taussig (professor, Harvard University); Graham Taylor (associate editor, CHARITIES AND THE COMMONS; Graham Romeym Taylor (staff member, CHARITIES AND THE COMMONS); Harry D. Thomas (Secretary-Treasurer, Ohio Federation of Labor, A.F. of L.); William H. Tolman (Director, American Institute of Social Service); U.S. Bureau of Labor; U.S. Department of Commerce and Labor; Mary Van Kleeck (Industrial Secretary, Alliance Employment Bureau, N.Y.); V.C. Vaughan; Lillian D. Wald; and F.F. Wesbrook (Dean, University of Minnesota, College of Medicine and Surgery); and others.

 
B. Correspondence, 1910-1915. [subseries]:
 
1. Correspondence (A-G), 1910-1915. [subseries]:
Include correspondence relating to a bill banning the use of white phosphorous in the match industry; meetings and programs of the Association; occupational diseases; accident reporting; workmen's compensation; workplace inspection; child labor; women's hours of work; minimum wage investigation; lead poisoning; questions of mediation and compulsory arbitration; a study of anthrax as an occupational disease; health insurance; revision of the compressed air provisions of the New York State Labor Law; the Kern bill; the National Conference on Unemployment; and the operation of the Municipal Lodging House, on the Board of which Andrews served. Major and frequent correspondents include Stephen Bauer, James D. Beck, Joseph P. Chamberlain, Katharine Coman, John R. Commons, Clarence Darrow, Edgar T. Davies, Miles M. Dawson, John J. Esch, Henry W. Farnam, Irving Fisher, John A. Fitch, Ernst Freund, and Samuel Gompers.

Other individual and organizational correspondents of national significance or who wrote with some frequency include the following with names beginning with letters A-G: Jane Addams; Felix Adler; Magnus W. Alexander (Vice-President, National Society for the Promotion of Industrial Education); Frederic Almy (Secretary, Charity Organization Society, Buffalo, N.Y.); Amalgamated Association of Street and Electric Railway Employees of America; American Medical Association; Leo Arnstein; James P. Boyle; Edwin V. Brake (Colorado Bureau of Labor Statistics); Louis D. Brandeis; Lillian Brandt (Secretary, International Congress on Tuberculosis); Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen; Robert W. Bruere (New York Association for Improving the Condition of the Poor); and the Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators, and Paperhangers of America.

Other correspondents include Gerald W. Brown (Assistant Deputy Minister of Labour, Canada); Bureau of Animal Industry Employees; Bureau of Liability Insurance Statistics; James T. Burke (Chief Inspector, Office of Inspector of Factories, Toronto); Frank T. Carlton (Michigan Child Labor Committee); D.L. Cease (Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen); Howell Cheney (Child Labor Committee); Everett Colby; Solon DeLeon; Edward T. Devine; Davis Rich Dewey (Massachusetts Institute of Technology); Carroll W. Doten (head of Research Department, School for Social Workers, Simmons College and Harvard University); Frank S. Drown; Mary E. Dreier (President, New York Women's Trade Union League); Mrs. W.F. Dummer; Crystal Eastman (Mrs. Crystal Eastman Benedict); Lucile Eaves (University of Nebraska); Howard P. Eells (Treasurer, National Metal Trades Association); Everette E. Ellinwood; Richard T. Ely; Lillian Erskine; and Elizabeth Glendower Evans (Secretary, Lyman and Industrial Schools).

 
2. Correspondence (H-M), 1910-1915. [subseries]:
Include correspondence relating to a bill banning the use of white phosphorous in the match industry; meetings and programs of the Association; occupational diseases; accident reporting; workmen's compensation; worksite inspection; child labor; women's hours of work; the minimum wage investigation; lead poisoning; questions of mediation and compulsory arbitration; the study of anthrax as an occupational disease; health insurance; the revision of the compressed air provisions of the New York State Labor Law; the Kern Bill; the National Conference on Unemployment; and the operation of the Municipal Lodging House, on the Board of which Andrews served. Major and frequent correspondents include L.W. Hatch, Frederick L. Hoffman, Seth Low, Royal Meeker, Thomas J. Parkinson, I.M. Rubinow, and Henry R. Seager.

Other individual and organizational correspondents of national significance or who wrote with some frequency include the following with names beginning with letters H-M: Fred S. Hall (Secretary, Pennsylvania Child Labor Association); M.B. Hammond (associate professor, Ohio State University); William Hard (writer, Everybody's); G.W.W. Hanger (U.S. Bureau of Labor); Samuel R. Haythorn; C.R. Henderson; Hamilton Higday; Morris Hillquit; Frederick L. Hoffman (Statistician, Prudential Insurance Co.); Reinhard Hohaus; Robert Hunter; Illinois State Federation of Labor; Frances Ingram (Neighborhood House, Louisville, Ky.); International Seamen's Union of America; International Typographical Union; Ethel M. Johnson (Massachusetts Department of Labor and Industry); Frederick N. Judson; Marie Kasten (State of Connecticut Industrial Commission); Florence Kelley; Arthur Kellogg; Paul U. Kellogg; Susan M. Kingsbury (director, Women's Educational and Industrial Union; William Kirk; Robert M. La Follette; John Lapp (editor, Modern Medicine); Julia C. Lathrop (Hull House); William Launer (secretary, Glass Bottle Blowers' Association); Max Lazard; F. Lee (U.S. Senate Legislative Counsel); Don D. Lescohier (Secretary, Minnesota Branch AALL); Samuel McCune Lindsay (Secretary, National Child Labor Committee); Walter Lippmann; Max O. Lorenz (Bureau of Labor and Industrial Statistics, Wisconsin); Louisiana Board of Health; Owen R. Lovejoy (General Secretary, National Child Labor Committee); and Seth Low.

Other correspondents include S.W. McCall; Roswell C. McCrea (Associate Director, The School of Philanthropy); Mary E. McDowell (University of Chicago Settlement); W.E. McEwen (Labor Commissioner, Bureau of Labor and Industries, Minnesota); Alexander J. McKelway (Secretary for the Southern States, National Child Labor Committee); Reuben McKitrick; V.E. Macy (Treasurer of New York Branch); W.A. Mahon (Amalgamated Association of Street and Electric Railway Employees of America); Theodore Marburg; John Martin; Frederick C. Martindale (secretary of state, Department of State); Massachusetts Bureau of Statistics; Royal Meeker (U.S. Department of Labor); H.V. Mercer (attorney, member, Minnesota Employees' Compensation Commission); Darwin J. Meserole (Managing Attorney, The Cooperative Law Company); Henry C. Metcalf (Tufts College); John Mitchell (Vice President, A.F. of L.); Wesley C. Mitchell; Anne Morgan; Frank Morrison (A.F. of L.); Edward A. "Ned" Moseley (Secretary, Interstate Commerce Commission); Henry Moskowitz (Secretary, Society for Ethical Culture); and Hugo Munsterberg (professor).

 
3. Correspondence (N-W), 1910-1915. [subseries]:
Include correspondence relating a bill banning the use of white phosphorous in the match industry; meetings and programs of the Association; occupational diseases; accident reporting; workmen's compensation; workplace inspection; child labor; women's hours of work; minimum wage investigation; lead poisoning; questions of mediation and compulsory arbitration; a study of anthrax as an occupational disease; health insurance; revision of the compressed air provisions of the New York State Labor Law; the Kern bill; the National Conference on Unemployment; and the operation of the Municipal Lodging House, on the Board of which Andrews served.

Major and frequent correspondents include Thomas J. Parkinson, I.M. Rubinow, and Henry R. Seager.

Other individual and organizational correspondents of national significance or who wrote with some frequency include the following with names beginning with letters N-W: The National Association of Manufacturers of the United States; the National Child Labor Committee; the National Civic Federation; the National Consumers League; the National Metal Trades Association; Charles P. Neill (United States Commissioner of Labor); Agnes Nestor (treasurer, Women's Trade Union League); Richard M. Neustadt; New Republic; New York State Department of Health; New York State Factory Investigating Committee; North American Civic League for Immigrants; Henry Noyes; the Ohio Federation of Labor; Irene Osgood Andrews; Carl E. Parry (instructor, University of Michigan); and Paul Skeels Pierce (Assistant Professor, State University of Iowa).

Other correspondents include Jessica B. Peixotta (Assistant Professor, University of California, Berkeley); A.J. Pillsbury (Chairman, California State Industrial Accident Board); John W. Plaisted (Secretary, Industrial Relations Committee, Boston Chamber of Commerce); C.W. Price (International Harvester Company); Prudential Insurance Company of America; C.R. Richards (Columbia University, Secretary, National Society for the Promotion of Industrial Education); Raymond Robins; Russell Sage Foundation; Mary R. Sanford (member, Executive Committee of the Intercollegiate Socialist Society); Sophy Sanger (British Association for Labor Legislation); Margaret A. Schaffner; Louis B. Schram; F. Charles Schwedtman (Consulting Electrical and Mechanical Engineers); Laura Scott; Elizabeth Shapleigh; and P. Tecumseh Sherman (attorney, Taft & Sherman).

Additional correspondents include John R. Shillady (New York State Department of Labor); Erich Cramer Stern (attorney); William L. Stoddard (associate of Lincoln Filene); Warren S. Stone (grand chief, Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers); Josiah Strong (President, American Institute of Social Services); Helen L. Sumner Woodbury; Survey (Constance D. Leupp, Edward T. Devine, Graham Taylor, Arthur P. Kellogg); Wiley Swift (Secretary, National Child Labor Committee); Graham R. Taylor; Harry D. Thomas (Secretary-Treasurer, Ohio Federation of Labor); Millie R. Trumbull (Consumers League of Oregon); U.S. Bureau of Labor, Commission on Industrial Relations; Mary Van Kleeck (industrial secretary, Alliance Employment Bureau, New York); Louis Varlez (Lutte Contre Chomage); V.C. Vaughan; Charles H. Verrill; Lillian D. Wald; John H. Walker; Paul H. Watrous (Secretary, Industrial Insurance Committee of the Wisconsin State Legislature); Adna F. Weber; F.F. Wesbrook (Dean, University of Minnesota College of Medicine and Surgery); Wisconsin State Industrial Commission; Stephen Wise; Women's Educational and Industrial Union; Clinton Rogers Woodruff (Attorney, Secretary, National Municipal League); and Edwin R. Wright (Illinois State Federation of Labor).

 
C. Correspondence, 1915-1920. [subseries]:
Include letters relating to the passage of the Hughes-Esch bill; prohibiting phosphorous in matches; health insurance; relief of unemployment through public works; workmen's compensation; unemployment insurance; methods of reporting accidents on the job and occupational disease; in support of a federal museum of safety; of standards legislation in the compressed air industry; and of cleanliness regulations for lead workers. A six-day workweek is advocated in the correspondence as is the three-shift system. Reorganization of state labor bureaus, especially in Kentucky, Maryland, and New Jersey are discussed, as is the use of labor laws in wartime; war emergency measures; the Robinson-Keating bill; the Federal Public Employment Service; amendments to workmen's compensation legislation which would exclude profit-making insurance carriers; coal mine safety; universal health insurance for workers; a minimum wage for women; and maternity insurance. Also addressed is the Donahue-Davenport health insurance bill; attacks on health insurance as being "un-American" by the New York League for Americanism and the Association's efforts to combat such opposition; and the Sterling-Lehlbach (federal workers' retirement) bill. There are, in addition, reports by I.M. Rubinow on the Zionist movement in Palestine. Major correspondents include Charles Barnes, Stephen Bauer, Middleton Beaman, Milton Fairchild, Henry B. Favill, Irving Fisher, S.S. Goldwater, Samuel Gompers, John Randolph Haynes, Frederick L. Hoffman, Edward Keating, Alexander Lambert, V.E. Macy, James Maurer, Royal Meeker, Frances Perkins, Joseph Robinson, I.M. Rubinow, Sophy Sanger, Henry R. Seager, and Irene Sylvester Chubb.

Other individual and organizational correspondents of national significance or who wrote with some frequency include the American Federation of Labor; British Medical Association; Joseph P. Chamberlain; Samuel Gompers (president, American Federation of Labor); Paul U. Kellogg (Director, "Pittsburgh Survey", Charities and the Commons); Samuel McCune Lindsay (Secretary, National Child Labor Committee, President, American Association for Labor Legislation, Staff Director, Republican National Committee); Walter Lippmann; Meyer London; Irene Osgood Andrews; U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics; and the Royal Meeker Commission.

 
D. Correspondence, 1920-1925. [subseries]:
Include correspondence relating to the Fess-Kenyon Bill; the vocational rehabilitation of disabled workers; workmen's compensation for longshoremen, seamen, and private employees; the passage of the federal employment retirement bill; unemployment insurance; the need for an unemployment insurance investigating committee in New York; maternity insurance; the six-day workweek; reasonable hours of work; coal mine safety; discrimination against non-resident dependents of aliens in alloting compensation; the blanket equality amendment of the National Woman's Party; a child labor amendment; labor law administration; pension systems and insurance; the living wage; mine accident prevention; radium poisoning; and coal dusting.

Major correspondents include American Mining Congress, H. Foster Bain, Stephen Bauer, Thomas Chadbourne, Joseph Chamberlain, Irene Sylvester Chubb, Miles Dawson, Abraham Epstein, Roy G. Fitzgerald, Felix Frankfurter, Andrew Furuseth, Henri Fuss, William Green, Alice Hamilton, J.J. Handley, John Randolph Haynes, Sidney Hillman, E.A. Holbrook, Herbert Hoover, Otto Mallery, Mining Safety Coordinating Committee, Mining Standardization Coordinating Committee, T.V. O'Connor, Gifford Pinchot, Ida Tarbell, Louis Varlez, Katherine Wiley, and Stephen Wise.

Other individual and organizational correspondents of national significance or who wrote with some frequency include American Federation of Labor; Roger N. Baldwin (American Civil Liberties Union); Anthony Chlopek (President, International Longshoremen's Association); John R. Commons; Warren G. Harding; John Randolph Haynes; Frank Hering (Chairman, Fraternal Order of Eagles); International Association for Labor Legislation; International Labour Office (League of Nations); International Longshoremen's Association; International Seamen's Union of America; Florence Kelley; Alexander Lambert, MD; Meyer London; James Lynch (Commissioner, New York State Industrial Commission); Royal Meeker (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics); National Woman's Party; New York State Industrial Commission; Frances Perkins (New York State Industrial Commission); Ethelbert Stewart (Bureau of Labor Statistics); Irene Sylvester (Mrs. Chubb); United Mine Workers of America; U.S. Bureau of Mines (Department of Interior); U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics; U.S. Employees Compensation Commission; and Edwin E. Witte.

 
E. Correspondence, 1925-1930. [subseries]:
Include correspondence relating to labor law administration; problems of workmen's compensation; increased use of yellow dog contracts; improving workmen's compensation; pension systems; reduction of industrial waste; accident prevention; unemployment relief; passage of legislation to protect interstate workers, especially longshoremen and seamen; the Cummins-Graham bill; the Fitzgerald Workers' Compensation Bill; the mine safety bill; coal dusting; the effect of the American Association for Old Age Security on the American Association for Labor Legislation and the possible merger of the two organizations; the Jones bill, concerning vocational rehabilitation of disabled workers; compensation for railroad workers; and the Wagner bill, regarding adequate public employment bureaus, and known in earlier years as the Kenyon-Nolan bill.

Major correspondents include Thomas L. Chadbourne, Anthony Chlopek, John R. Commons, Miles M. Dawson, W.N. Doak, Paul H. Douglas, Felix Frankfurter, John Fitch, Andrew Furuseth, William Green, Frank Hering, E.A. Holbrook, Margaret James, Fiorello La Guardia, John L. Lewis, James Lynch, George W. Norris, Frances Perkins, Eleanor Roosevelt, Franklin D. Roosevelt, I.M. Rubinow, Joseph Ryan, Ethelbert Talbot, Worth M. Tippy, Charles H. Verrill, Robert F. Wagner, Frederick Wilcox, and Stephen Wise.

Other individual and organizational correspondents of national significance or who wrote with some frequency include Jane Addams (Hull House); American Association for Old Age Security; American Federation of Labor; Joseph P. Chamberlain; Abraham Epstein; Roy G. Fitzgerald (Congressman); International Labour Office, Washington Branch; International Longshoremen's Association; International Seamen's Union of America; Florence Kelley; Paul U. Kellogg; Thomas Kennedy (President, United Mine Workers of America, District 7); Leifur Magnusson (Washington representative, International Labour Office); Otto Mallery; Royal Meeker (Bureau of Labor Statistics); Irene Sylvester Chubb; Ida Tarbell; United Mine Workers of America; Bureau of Mines; Department of Labor; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Employees Compensation Commission; and Edwin E. Witte.

 
F. Correspondence, 1930-1935. [subseries]:
Include correspondence relating to workmen's compensation; vocational rehabilitation; lobbying for the regulation of fee-charging employment agencies; the financial conditions of the Association; social insurance; pensions; unemployment remedies; unemployment relief bills; the Association's survey of unemployment across the United States; public works projects; the Association's "American Plan for Unemployment Insurance"; the Wagner Employment Bill; the New York Conference for Unemployment Reserves Legislation; the Wisconsin Commission for Unemployment Reserves Legislation; unemployment reserves; the Croweel vs. Benson decision; a national system of public employment offices; federal encouragement of state unemployment reserves; workmen's compensation for railroad and interstate workers; social security; the question of state vs. national social insurance; the United States Commission on Economic Security; and the Railway Labor Executives' Association.

Major correspondents include Arthur J. Altmeyer, Elizabeth Brandeis, Thomas L. Chadbourne, Joseph P. Chamberlain, John R. Commons, Grace L. Coyle, Miles M. Dawson, W.M. Doak, Walter F. Dodd, Dorothy J. Douglas, Ernest G. Draper, Mary E. Dreier, John A. Fitch, William Green, Robert M. La Follette, Isador Lubin, Thomas J. Parkinson, Frances Perkins, Railway Labor Executives' Association, Paul Raushenbush, Franklin D. Roosevelt, I.M. Rubinow, Rose Schneiderman, Eustace Seligman, Ida Tarbell, Robert F. Wagner, Fred Wilcox, Edwin E. Witte, and Leo Wolman.

Other individuals and organizational correspondents of national significance or who wrote with some frequency include Mary Anderson (Director, Women's Bureau, U.S. Department of Labor); Felix Frankfurter; Olga Halsey (former American Association for Labor Legislation staff); John Randolph Haynes; Frank Hering (Chairman, Fraternal Order of Eagles); Thomas Kennedy (President, United Mine Workers of America, District 7); John Fitch (Chairman, New York Conference for Unemployment Insurance Legislation); Irene Sylvester (Mrs. Chubb); and United Mine Workers of America.

 
G. Correspondence, 1935-1940. [subseries]:
Include correspondence relating to the economic security bill; workmen's compensation; the interstate commerce bill; the Social Security Act; occupational safety; occupational diseases, especially silicosis and tuberculosis; the Association's opposition depriving silicosis victims of compensation; Andrew's study of British factory inspection and labor law administration; Association finances; a study of silicosis and ventilation in state mine inspection; mine safety standards; the Association's study of municipal legislation; physical examinations for workers; the ratification of the International Labour Office maritime convention; the Wagner Act; the Walsh-Healy bill; amendments to the interstate workers' compensation bill; and the Vocational Rehabilitation Act. Major correspondents include Edward W. Bakke, Elizabeth Brandeis, Walter Gelhorn, D. Harrington, Sidney Hillman, Harold L. Ickes, Ethel M. Johnson, John A. Kratz, Fiorello La Guardia, John L. Lewis, Isador Lubin, Frances Perkins, Walter Polakov, Paul Raushenbush, Eustace Seligman, Robert F. Wagner, John Winant, and Edwin E. Witte.

Other individuals and organizational correspondents of national significance or who wrote with some frequency include Grace Abbot (Children's Bureau, U.S. Department of Labor, University of Chicago); Mary Anderson (Director, Women's Bureau, U.S. Department of Labor); William Green (United Mine Workers of America); Robert Marion La Follette, Jr.; and United Mine Workers of America.

 
H. Correspondence, 1940-1943. [subseries]:
Include correspondence relating to social security protection; federal mine safety inspection; the extension of workmen's compensation to all interstate employees; physical examinations for workers; federal health and disability insurance; the need for extending social security protection to farm workers; a proposed joint meeting of the American Association for Labor Legislation and the Rural Sociological Society discuss Mexican workers in the United States; and wartime conditions; also condolence letters on the death of John B. Andrews. Major correspondents include Arthur J. Altmeyer, C. Clively, C. Edwin Gilmore; Merritt L. Gordon, Harold L. Ickes, Morris Leeds, and H. Pillsbury Style.

Other individual and organizational correspondents of national significance or who wrote with some frequency include William Green (United Mine Workers of America); Sidney Hillman (Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America); John L. Lewis (President, United Mine Workers); Frances Perkins (New York State Industrial Commission, U.S. Department of Labor); United Mine Workers of America; and Edwin E. Witte.